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I want to make a device to send and receive data using the main power line, and I want it to be compatible with the X10 protocol, but i have no resource on the circuit and I don't know how to inject the data to the main or receive it.

I know about the protocol and the theory, but I have nothing practical to begin with, so any circuit schematic or basic how to will be of great help for me to get a kick start.

I am planning to make a device around AVR micro controllers that can send and receive data over power line with the X10 protocol.

What I would like to know about at this point is how I can inject my data to the main line.

Edit: creating a 120kHz is easy, but transferring/inducting/injecting it to the main line is the problem. I don't know how to do it. what is the right way to do it? I thinks it's called coupling but there are many kinds of coupling and i don't know which one to use.

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why the down vote? –  Farzad Bekran Jan 17 '13 at 19:02
    
Have you looked for techniques that are used? –  Leon Heller Jan 17 '13 at 19:02
    
I cant find any resource I told you, there are plenty of theoretical stuff but none of them actually tells you how to do it. I would love to find some! can you show me some? –  Farzad Bekran Jan 17 '13 at 19:04
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@FarzadBekran Have you seen the many questions listed as related to this? 1 2 3 4 –  Kortuk Jan 17 '13 at 19:15
    
This question is too broad. Injecting your data on the power line involves the whole of electrical engineering. What part is giving you trouble? –  Phil Frost Jan 17 '13 at 19:28
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closed as not a real question by Leon Heller, Olin Lathrop, Dave Tweed, Brian Carlton, Nick Alexeev Jan 18 '13 at 2:58

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

Here, let me Google that for you... Doing a simple search for "X10 circuit" brought up about 3.5 million hits. One of the first ones is this application note from Microchip on X10 interfacing. Enjoy.

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lol I totally love this: You don't have permission to access "http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/appnotes/00236a.pdf" on this server. Reference #18.7d3ff5cc.1358451338.ce6bcf88 –  Farzad Bekran Jan 17 '13 at 19:36
    
@FarzadBekran works for me. Company / national firewall? –  Phil Frost Jan 17 '13 at 19:41
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Living in Iran has it's consequences ;) –  Farzad Bekran Jan 17 '13 at 19:43
    
@FarzadBekran Just use the quickview from google. This usually bypasses the firewall. Under the link name look for the word cached or quickview and it will open it through google. –  Gustavo Litovsky Jan 17 '13 at 20:13
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docs.google.com/file/d/0BzQy7VqoEbCraTd3YVZzcFBVaTg/edit donwload it from here if you can't see it –  Andres Jan 17 '13 at 21:19
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