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Ultimately I think the question is flawed. And I do NOT get close to any answer. Hard to get 22k saved from 32K, when nanocode takes up 14.4K. From 1. In some cases, such as the Motorola 68000, there is also a nanocode engine. The 68000 uses 544 17-bit words in its microengine and 336 68-bit words in its nanocode engine. It thus has 32,096 bits of ...


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Yes, the /IORQ pin should go low when an OUT instruction is executed. The fact that yours isn't suggests that the program is crashing or not running at all. There could be many reasons for this malfunction, such as a wiring error, faulty chip etc. I would start by checking to see if the CPU can work by itself. To do that I would:- Remove the VIA and ...


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The answers above, while correct, miss the point about why FPGAs (and custom ASICs) are especially good for bitcoin calculations. The real advantage is that a large proportion of the SHA-256 calculations are logical operations (for example, bit shifts) which can be done in wiring. When done this way, they require 0 clock cycles. Another important advantage ...


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No, it would be normal to clock the CPU at 50MHz. Or double the input clock to 100MHz for example, if the design is fast enough. Now you know the memory stage takes 5 clock cycles, so you stall the CPU when it can do nothing because it is waiting for memory. Then there is a obvious gain from compiling your code to minimise memory accesses and their ...


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1) Any time there is current flow, heat is generated by the collisions of the electrons. 2) Yes, generally, the correlation is linear. 3) It is very unlikely that CPU manufactures optimize the position of individual transistors, to minimize the heat generated (they are all inside the same casing). When a CPU is "idle", although it uses a minimum amount of ...



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