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this one is not easily ansered in short. But I try: The basic building block of a mcu is a "Logic Gate". These come in differrent flavours: AND / OR / NOT / XOR etc. see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logic_gate. The other one is a Memory cell. Depending on the technique your cpu uses these can be build with transistors / mosfets etc. For simplicity just ...


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You don't need to worry, at this level, how electricity works in a CPU, or whether a CPU 'knows' anything. If you want to build a CPU from transistors, then knowing how electricity works would be a Good Thing. At this level, presumably you are happy that a CPU has registers, can address memory, can decode instructions, and all of these can be considered to ...


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CPU logic is very complicated and varies between architectures but your question can be understood at the logic gate level. The CPU has a register called the instruction pointer (IP) which contains the address of the next instruction for the CPU to fetch from memory. Normally, after each instruction there are some logic circuits that increment the ...


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Most microprocessors with gpus end up in embedded computers anyway, but if you want real grunt and aren't afraid of some not-so-user-friendly programming languages, check out Altera's Cyclone V SoC or Xilinx's Zynq, multicore Arm chips coupled with not insubstantial amounts of FPGA logic, DDR3 support and dedicated gpus. For sheer computational grunt (but ...


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As I know there are not any product in Cortex M series with GHZ clock rate(even so far in Cortex M7 families yet) if you don't want to pursue your path to the Cortex A families ,You must maybe consider other options like DSPs,But before that Exactly determine your goals & milestones.As you know many vendors like TI,FreeScale & ... have SOCs consist ...


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I would argue that "depth" is a measure of instruction overlap in the sense that it indicates the amount of time (number of clock cycles) that must elapse before the result of one instruction can be used by a subsequent instruction. However, there might be additional hardware stages (instruction prefetch and decode, memory write, etc.) that do not ...


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I learned very much from Ars Technica's Jon "Hannibal" Stokes excellent and extensive articles on the subject of microprocessor architecture. The articles are a little dated (they seem to be from about 2004), but still very relevant. Understanding the Microprocessor, Part I: Basic Computing Concepts Understanding Pipelining and Superscalar Execution, Part ...


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This seems like a perfect application for a "SoC" FPGA like a Xilinx Zynq or Altera Cyclone V SoC. These parts combine a dual-core ARM CPU core with FPGA fabric on the same package, with high-speed interconnect in between. You could instantiate whatever glue logic required in the FPGA half (SPI interfaces, LVDS, etc.), and then use one of the various AXI ...



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