Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I don't think you can; it's not available on Digikey or RS when I just looked. The Edison is a "computer on module" part; the chip itself will have a complex fine-pitch BGA pinout which is difficult to solder other than on a manufacturing line. You're supposed to use it as a daughterboard on your own system.


2

Certainly. There is a lot of stuff crammed on that board, though. It's probably at least a 6 layer board. It would be a complex board to design and a bit costly to produce, but it is certainly possible. It would be difficult to get the cost down to the same level as the Edison board itself.


2

There is no easy simple answer to this question. The first thing to say is clock frequency is not really that important. For years people believe that the higher clock frequency the faster the processor is, and this is not true. What you can say is that if you have a particular processor chip and you clock it at a frequency, and then you increase that ...


2

Does this help? This Wikipedia article points to EV68DC being an a.k.a. of the C variant. This led me to the 21264/EV68DC Microprocessor Hardware Reference Manual.


1

Gracious reply from Stephen Morse (designer of the 8086)... Boy, you are really asking a question from my deep distant past. The answer obviously has to do with the way the addressing modes were micro-coded, and the person who wrote the microcode (Jim McKevitt) is no longer alive. So I don't know how you can get an authoritative answer. A ...


4

This is a broad question, but yes, it seems you found a minimum micro that still does what you specified. However, that may not be a good idea unless this is a volume product. Stuff happens, and unforseen things come up. You may very well wish you had a few more pins or a little more processing power as you get into the project. I'll assume this is a ...


0

I would say this have something to do with the internal bus. BP+DI or BX+SI does not require a piece of data to cross from one internal bus to another but the other way around requires so. This is when the processor have to spend one more cycle to let the bus settle down.


1

Of course they can be soldered. That's how they are mounted to the board during manufacturing. The BGA (ball grid array) style of package you are referring to needs special equipment to solder, but absolutely it can be soldered. That's how it's intended to be used.


1

When you add two numbers with pencil and paper you work from right to left, adding two digits, recording the result, and carrying any overflow. Adding large numbers on a computer works the same way. Each number is represented by a set of "digits" where each "digit" is a computer word: 8 or 32 bits wide in your two examples. When two such numbers are added, ...


8

It's certainly possible to work with very large numbers even on 8 bit or 4 bit computers. It's not very efficient, but it's possible. The way this is done is by operating on the numbers in pieces, with the support of specific processor instructions. A common 8 bit microcontroller is the Atmel AVR series. To add 8-bit numbers, it uses an instruction ...


4

As you said, 32bit CPUs can handle numbers larger than 32 bit, so why shouldn't a 8bit CPU be able to do this? If you add two numbers, you start with the last bit of both. If one of them is 1, the result is 1, if both are 1, the result is 0, and you have to carry a 1 to the calculation of the second bit. For the second bit, you have the two bits of the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included