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0

I'm not an expert in electronics, so I don't know what the H&H approach is, but as an enthusiastic artist smitten with the intricacy of tubes, I wonder if archive.org's holdings might be the answer: https://archive.org/details/vacuumtubemanuals Particularly charming cartoons start this ...


1

It's not really a book like Art of Electronics, but a great online source for info on tubes is TubeBooks.org


7

Similar approach may be a tall request- H&H's approach is not typical of older books. The Radio Amateur's Handbook is a good reference. The best in-depth reference is probably the MIT Radiation Laboratory series, covering all sorts of military-related wartime electronics work. Many of the techniques can be translated into modern electronics.


6

Try to find a old RCA Receiving Tube Manual from the early 1970s or earlier. These were basically a collection of datasheets for the tubes RCA made, but also had some introductory chapters on tube design, circuit design with tubes, and example circuits.


1

If you would indicate what sort of receiving setup you plan to use it would guide the answers. A (continuously variable) slope delta (CVSD) modulator IC (special part) would have been one method in the past but they are rarely used these days. The data is free running or synchronous usually. An 8 pin microcontroller and bit of code (special part) could ...


4

Yes. IEC 60320 covers these connectors. The Mickey Mouse connector is C5/C6 (Female/Male). The boxier connector is C13/C14. The reason for one over the other is mainly size and Amperage (and therefor temperature). C5 is rated for 2.5 Amps Main Voltage. C13 is rated for 10 Amps Main Voltage. Any power supply over 300W will not be able to use the C5. Most ...


1

A typical digital microphone circuit is produced of a few parts. Power, Microphone + Analog Pre-amp, a Analog to Digital Converter, and the Microcontroller/Receiver. Often the ADC and Controller are one piece. The Preamp can be as well. For example, the OVC3860 Bluetooth Audio IC is an all in one IC that provides Mic power, pre-amp and ADC, as well as ...


1

Get off you idea of "WITHOUT any special parts". An electret microphone will output a low level analog signal when some bias current is applied to the part via a resistor from a supply voltage. That low level signal then needs to be amplified to some level that is compatible with the analog to digital converter that will be used to produce the 1's and 0's ...


1

Your design is fundamentally a feedback control loop where the position is actuated by an electromagnet and measured by a pair of Hall effect sensors. At the core, such a design is practical but there are some critical details that merit close attention: Your method for measuring the displacement of the magnet is a bit questionable here because the sensor ...


2

0.156" (3.96mm) header with a female connector with jumpers in it is one way. Ratings by Molex are as much as 13A. You'll have to check that the clearances meet the requirements of whatever safety standards you have to meet. Photo from here You could have different female connectors with wires looped between different pins. If the clearances/creepage ...


1

If the "jumper" will actually be carrying 10 Amps at 120V, then you need fairly thick wires, in a safe way. You can either control a mechanical or solid state relay via low voltage control, or you need a switch. At that current and voltage, a typical residential power switch (On/On spdt) would do nicely. And cheap.


2

A thick wire!!! can't be more cheaper than that. Use your soldering iron to switch.


0

What are you asking? Are you trying to figure out the size of motor you would need? What components? There are multiple solutions. Simply, you could attach a motor, probably a small gear-head motor so you could get enough torque, a limit switch or two, and maybe a timer relay to get the pause you are looking for. Simple, cheap and uses off-shelf components. ...


2

Voltage in x gain = voltage out. The current that flows in the headphones is V/Z where Z is impedance of headphones. Z is a little frequency dependent. Input current to amplifier is voltage in/ input impedance. Input impedance is usually 1k to 1Mohm (generalism warning). Yes, you need to know the input voltage. You need to know the maximum it can attain ...


3

There are way too many possible answers to this question. But I can give you a really great starting point: Hans R. Camenzind was the inventor of the 555 timer chip. According to his website, he has designed 151 standard and custom ICs so far. He published several books over his lifetime. One of the best is available as a free download. The book that ...


0

Try to make an external pullup for D+ (1.5 kOhm, to the 3V3OUT pin). Maybe the problem is in internal pullup.


0

This is a low-pass filter. The only place I've ever seen this used is as the loop filter on a 4046 PLL circuit, in Don Lancaster's "CMOS Cookbook". I don't remember how much analysis he included. You need to show the rest of the circuit, the driver to the left and the receiver to the right. If you have a pure voltage source on the left, and a pure open ...


2

No it's a pretty crap regulator and cannot be counted on to source even 800mA. The datasheet says this. 800mA is only guaranteed with Vin-Vo = 5V and Tj = 25°C, and you have Vin-Vo = 1.7V (nominal) and hopefully you want it to work at other than 25°C. They do guarantee it will be no more than 1.3A and typically 950mA but again that's under conditions ...


3

Something that goes near to a formal definition can be found in this GoogleBook page. Excerpt: Another way to control the delay of an inverter is to add two extra transistors as shown in Fig.4.15a. This technique is also known as current starving. Lowering Vn and increasing Vp increases the effective drive resistance Req of the inverter and thus ...


2

In this context "current-starved" means that the current through the circuit is indeed limited. A "normal" inverter is directly connected to the ground and supply rails. In theory it can draw as much current as it likes. In this design, there's a currentmirror output in series with these connections. When the current that the inverter draws is less that the ...


-1

Here is a picture of the diode "power path." I am assuming you have some power source available since you indicated that you want to charge the battery while the system is on. Just use an LDO. Let's say you run your LDO at 2.7V. The average battery voltage is around 3.7V over the full range. So the average efficiency of the LDO is around 2.7/3.7V. That is ...


1

OK, here goes... In terms of safety, you will want to have some sort of protection against overcurrent faults at the power input stage. This could be a fuse, PTC resettable fuse, dedicated power management IC or a custom analog solution - but for this I would look at a PTC resettable fuse vs a traditional wire fuse. PTC should be cheaper (assuming you fit a ...


0

Try this one. you can adjust the "VAR1" to change on time. To further increase/decrease change capacitor (C1) value. I have uploaded Proteus simulation file.


0

maybe something crazy like this: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Reading from left to right: R3 is a potentiometer which you can tune how sensitive the pressure is required to trigger the logic change from the Force Sensistive Resistor (FSR) becoming lower resistance when pressure is applied (person steps on front ...


1

How long do you want the light to stay on for? Are you willing to tolerate a slow decay? You can do a simple delay timer using nothing more than a MOSFET and a RC network on the gate. But there are a few caveats and one subtlety. You want to use a MOSFET with a low threshold voltage, then charge the timing capacitor on the gate to a relatively high ...


3

Your goals are contradictory. my primary concerns are NOT using a microcontroller or 555, Okay. Not a real engineering goal but maybe an interesting goal for learning from. You'll find lots of monostable circuits online if you just google image search for them. It's also still possible to design digital logic from single gate building blocks. ...


1

OK, so after at first taking this circuit seriously, I now realize that it's actually a nonsense circuit. It appears here: https://www.seattleu.edu/scieng/ece/laboratory/cellphone/ with the explanation: "R1 and R2 form a voltage reference connected to U1-A Pin3. R3 and C2 form a RC circuit (You must understand basic RC circuits). Any sudden energy picked ...


1

Spehro's answer is correct. Your question is too broad. There isn't a generic process you can follow to determine which is the best way forward, as the "best" way depends on your criteria such as component availability, cost, time to develop, environment (temp, EMI, vibration, etc.) that the device will be working in, lifetime of the device and so on. ...


5

There is no one right answer and the right answer in any given situation will tend to change with time as different components become available (or unavailable) and costs and various prices change. At one time 0.1% resistors were pretty expensive in smallish quantities, now they're pretty reasonable and available. A 0.01% resistor may cost $15 or so in low ...


0

When roughing the circuit out, you might call a 100 ohm resistor 100 ohms exactly. Later when you fully analyze the design at the worst-case, and you have decided to use a 5% resistor, you'd run your analysis at 105 ohms and again at 95 ohms... and it is OK to use 3 digits of precision at the limits even though the resistor is only 5%.


0

So this will be a little tongue in cheek, but I think it is actually the most general answer to your question you can get: You use the approximation which gets a product out the door in time to make money, but not so early that you have to deal with too many bugs or issues when the customers come back with problems. When making hobby grade products out of ...


0

This to me is the very essence of "engineering". People spend their whole life not knowing what "good enough" means. Most engineers I know want to do it the "best" or "proper" way but the most effective engineers are the ones who know what is sufficient and when to move on. Leave "perfect" to the scientists and philosophers.



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