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1

As far as I know, Proteus is the only electric simulator where you can place a micro-controller, load a compiled program, connect other electrical components to the ports, and see how the system behaves. Despite being quite frown upon, I chose this way to learn and design my first microcontrolled circuits. And I'm still using it. Because: Building a ...


2

With isolated secondary windings, your transformer should easily support making two voltage rails. Assuming that they are simple secondaries as I attempted to draw in the circuit editor, two rectifiers should work as diagrammed. Note that the voltages are just for reference, you won't see that exact voltage in practice. The two diode bridges are used to ...


2

AO222 just means And-Or 2 2 2 which logically means: 3 2-input ands feeding into 1 3-input or. Most inverting complex gates are actually implemented in a single CMOS stage, but non-inverting gates, like the one you mention, need at least two stages. AO222 is most likely made from a AOI222 and an inverter. AOI222 = 3 2-input ands feeding into one 3-input ...


2

With regard to size of tracks, and in terms of the home PCB production equipment itself, I would recommend 0.25mm as the absolute smallest size that you can (reliably) get away with. But I tend to stick to >0.3mm if I can. Unfortunately this minimum size is dependent upon high quality transparency prints. To achieve 0.25mm I use a 1200DPI printer. You ...


0

I understand FIT as Failures over a billion hours of operation. MTBF = 1,000,000,000 x 1/FIT JEDEC JESD85 (Standart Used for semiconductors and thus relevant for most electronics) We use for our (industrial electronics) reliability calculations Siemens SN 29500, but it is kinda specific for Europa.


1

This isn't a thing you can design yourself. There is no such thing as a 3G "repeater" -- home cell network extenders actually act as their own small cellular base station. As such, they must contain a great deal of complex digital logic and RF electronics, and must be configured by a cellular provider.


4

As a rule, each CB must be dimensioned to protect the smallest unprotected wire in its circuit. In your schematic, the first CB has to protect the 4mm2 wire going to Room 1, but also 2mm2 wires going to outlet 1, outlet 2 etc., because those wires have no individual protection. Because of this, CB1 should be dimensioned to 15A or less. Otherwise, a 20A load ...


1

The CB protects the wires connected to it. At each node where the thick wire is distributed to thiner wires there should be placed CBs. For your example, the 1.5mm^2 wires are protected with 10A, 2.5mm^2 with 16A. The incoming 4mm^2 is protected before, at point where it was taken form thicker wire.


1

IO max is your maximum load current - how much current you need to run your load at the output voltage. Calculate I(PK) using the equation you have circled and as @scorpdaddy says, if its less than 500 ma you are ok without the external transistor. Otherwise add the transistor. Choose Rcl to give you the current sense you need, and choose a transistor ...


1

Your power supply concept makes sense (using a buck converter to make 5 V from 24 V), but your motor driver needs work. The voltage follower you show in your second schematic won't deliver much voltage to the motor. The FET will likely need a few volts G-S to turn on enough to allow useful motor current. With the gate at 5 V, that leaves very little to ...


1

How can I accomplish this? I would buy or build a small buck converter that takes a range of input voltages (say 18 V to 36 V) and delivers your logic supply (5 V or 3V3) for the Arduino. Maybe one of these: - The NPN transistor would probably have its emitter grounded with the motor wired between collector and 24V - you will need a flyback diode across ...



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