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There are few companies which make pogo pins for such small pitch. you can use a 1.5mm crimp housing connector as a quick hack, slide the pins through it and you have a ready made 1.5mm pitch test jig. However, a better approach would be to arrange the pins in a zigzag pattern (might not be possible in your case). Here is a 1.27mm pitch pogo: ...


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There use to be all these electronics "cookbooks" you can order them cheap on line. Opamp cookbook Cmos Cookbook TTL cookbook IC timer cookbook (I'm trying to think of others..)


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I would get a copy of The Art of Electronics. It's considered by many as the "bible" of electronics design. It's an old book but to this day it's a really good reference.


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Books and lectures will tell you that there are two ways: bottom-up and top-down. In my option, beginners should start top-down, because you know what you want (the system) and you can divide it into modules like Dave described. If you gathered some experience you will probabily have some kind of a module collection or your design goal is not to build a ...


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Output F needs to be active for all odd numbers except 7. So... LSB to mux 20 input, mux outputs '0' for even numbers and '1' for odd numbers. AND gate detects 7, output to mux 21 input forces it to output '3' instead of '1'.


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I generally take a top-down design approach, and I start by drawing a block diagram that shows the interfaces among the top-level blocks. I then draw additional diagrams that represent the implementations of the top-level blocks in terms of lower-level blocks. This hierarchy of block diagrams translates pretty much directly to the hierarchy of the HDL ...


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A few things about your basic circuit before I address your specific questions. i. Every IC needs a decoupling capacitor. For this circuit, that applies to the linear regulator and the microcontroller. For the microcontroller, as with most ICs, a 0.1uF capacitor between VCC and GND is typical. The capacitor should be as close as possible to the physical ...


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They're arranged this way so that moving a single unit in either axis changes the value of ideally only a single variable. This makes it easier to read and interpret the map.


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That depends on where you place your variables in the gray code running along the edges. If you write out the graycode you will see that every square contains the combined graycode from the horizontal and vertical edge (with x_5x_4x_3x_2x_1 in the the right order of course) interpreted as a binary number.


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I agree that illustration is confusing. The top half of the page is intended to describe the TLB. It sounds like you understand TLB stuff pretty well. The entire bottom half of the page is intended to describe the data cache. (The label "cache" on the left is intended to apply to the entire bottom half of the page. How could it be redrawn to make it more ...


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I do not believe the perforated metal cage is there to act as a Faraday Cage. It is there for safety reasons to prevent contact with the high voltages within. The hole sizes are required to be smaller than the standard finger defined in safety ratings. A perforated rather than solid part is used for ventilation and cooling.



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