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2

While you can't trigger a relay directly from the audio jack, you can trigger a transistor, which in turn triggers a relay, to do what you want. An external power supply would be needed for the relay. DSLR Remote is an Android app that is designed to work with DSLR remote release cable ports. One option is IR diodes, but transistors on the audio jack ...


1

Its doable, but I suspect that you'd get annoyed by the delays involved, not to mention mis-activations. Delay wise, the phone would have to link to your wi-fi when you got within range. That could be when you're halfway up the block, or maybe not until to get close to the door. If you have to wait there even 5 seconds, thats not so good right? I assume if ...


1

So you want to be able to display the ALU result both before and after it is stored in memory, and be able to load that result into the ALU's a or b input? Connect all the data lines together to form a bus. Obviously this bus can only carry one 8 bit value at a time, so each device connected to it needs an input register (8 bit latch) to write (STORE) ...


4

That's simple — you just need to AC-couple the switch, like this: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab R4 and C4 are new components; their time constant is set to 10 ms, a small fraction of your timer period. Regardless of how long the switch is held, the TRIGGER input of the 555 will only see a short low-going ...


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In the last few pictures, it looks like you've configured the "sub flag" as an output, not an input. Since there's nothing driving that net, it's resulting in an error.


3

This is not possible, as you view it. Conservation of energy IN: 10V*10uA == 100uW OUT: 50*1A = 50W. You will need a power amplifier to take the small-signal AC to increase the power capability


5

Additional specifications as clarified by "tman" Signal is not expected between 75deg and 90 deg and also between 0deg and -90deg elevation, and rejection in these sectors is not explicitly required. An omni-directional antenna is an acceptable solution. The antenna is to be used indoors in a fixed installation -- inside a home at about ceiling height. ...


0

There is a nice white paper from SCHAFFNER explaining the 0.1/100 Ohm curves. Note that attenuation is measured as a voltage ratio (not a power ratio), so when working at different input/output impedances, you can actually have a voltage gain.


0

Passive circuits cannot produce a power gain but they can produce a voltage gain. A resonant circuit can produce a voltage gain equal to its Q. If the impedance levels are considered, there is no power gain.


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There is no problem with your circuit. although I would suggest that you set pull-down resistors on the outputs. that's because the decoders usually set their outputs to high-impedance (high-Z) when they're not enabled. so the output may remain the same on the output node (because of node capacitance) and the wrong value may be read by the device that is ...


2

I added the same object in eagle now too and it works fine here. Maybe the 'random' pins are also connected ground for example. If the shift register is closer to a component that is also connected to ground you will see a yellow line (from the unrouted layer) to that component. To check if this is the case you can use the show function on the board ...


0

You need to download a simulator. Sigasi is only for design entry (typing and inspecting code). Look here for a list of free simulators: http://www.sigasi.com/faq/which-free-vhdl-simulator-can-i-use


0

Is there a special conversion happening?! Your image for slide 25 corresponds to figure 9.10 found on Page 506 and slide 27 corresponds to table 9.3 found on Page 507 in the book "Digital Arithmetic" by Miloŝ D. Ercegovac and Tomás Lang, 2004, ISBN: 1-55860-798-6. If you look in the book the text below figure 9.10 (b) on Page 506, Example 9.2: The ...


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As others have stated: the behaviour of the FF after power up is not random at all. The behaviour is neither completely determinstic (considering the factors you have under control), but being not completely deterministic doesn't mean it can be used as a good random generator. In this context a story concerning the state of FFs after power off: I remember ...


4

They don't use that concept because, unfortunately, it doesn't work-- the start-up state of a FF won't be very random at all. Quoting from "Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems -- CHES 2003: 5th International Workshop Volume 5" Making a truly random number generator is not easy.


1

This problem has already been solved. Thermal radiation is not perfectly uniform, and fluctuates rapidly at extremely small scales. Sample a space with enough precision and you have your RNG: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn6289-prize-draw-uses-heat-for-random-numbers.html Intel beat you too it buddy. Hope you didn't pay the patent fee already... :P


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As you may have gathered from the other responses, this is generally not a trivial exercise. At the individual component level, each manufacturer publishes a datasheet that lists, among many other things, the max and min supply voltages and the expected current for at least one recommended supply voltage. Add up all the components on the same internal ...


0

A computer is a very complex beast, with power management circuits that control the amount of power being fed to various subsystems. A laptop computer is designed to limit the amount of power it consumes. That is both to reduce the drain on it's battery and to not exceed the heat dissipation limits of the device. A laptop has one or more voltage ...


0

The computer was probably designed with a power budget of 60 watts. Most of this is consumed by the CPU, GPU, screen, and battery charger. They also decided that the input voltage from the adapter would be 16.5 volts, requiring 60W/16.5V ~= 3.65 amps. The power draw of the components can be measured under full load to ensure the power budget is met.


1

Whether you need a transistor buffer or not will depend on the current capability of the IOIO-OTG board, and the current requirements of your motor. A quick look through some of the IOIO_OTG documentation didn't reveal any IO current spec, but a photo of the board just shows one chip - presumably the PIC microcontroller, so I would assume the board can only ...



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