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7

You should also check out Eclipse for C/C++ and the AVR-Eclipse plugin. Works flawlessly for me, especially with crosspack. I use it for about a year now and I really like it.


6

I agree with zklapow but check the projects section on AVR Freaks too. That's how I learnt back in the day before arduinos. Also, you will almost certainly have to read the datasheet for your chip to get anything useful done. There are no nice functions that, for example, read an analog pin in because there are so many parameters that the arduino environment ...


5

I use either RRD TOOL which is good for monitoring of continuous streams of data. When I want to produce one off graphs I usually go with matplotlib.


4

"What circuit design and simulation software runs on a Mac?" The list of software tools for electronics design includes a bunch of tools that run on the Macintosh. Some of those tools, such as McCAD, were originally designed to run on a Macintosh. After Mac OS switched to a Unix base (starting with Mac OS X), quite a few tools originally designed to run on ...


4

I use ObDev's CrossPack as well. It's a great bundling of all the tools needed to write AVR-GCC C code. They're the same tools present in a standard Arduino installation, so sometimes I've used the guts of the Arduino build system to write plain AVR-GCC code. Normally when I write C code, the "IDE" I use is a text editor, command-line commands, and ...


3

They (Apple) most likely use PCs and Altium, OrCAD, or something of that type. Given the tight integration with the enclosures in many Apple products I would think that Altium is the best fit. Most professionals aren't into the entire 'fan boy' attitude. You use whatever is the best tool for the job. Apple doesn't even go after the workstation market ...


3

You could take a look at Pure Data a Max like language (it's not just for music generation) there's a Wikipedia page here with a bit more information about it. It's fully supported on Mac OSX and there's even a subforum here dedicated to linking it to things like Arduinos.


3

Since you have been using the Arduino everything you need is already installed. I compile Arduino sketches from the command line using a Makefile. I also compile code without the Arduino bootloader. The Makefile I use to compile the Arduino bootloader for my boards is at http://wiblocks.luciani.org/docs/app-notes/bootloader.html You could modify it to ...


3

If you install crosspack you can use Apple's Xcode for mac, which is a great IDE. If you want learn c for AVR check out the tutorials forum at AVR Freaks. Also as for linux check out this question.


3

I use Max for all my sensor processing and visualizing. Both Max and its younger open source sibling Pd have libraries for advanced graphics programming (Jitter and GEM respectively). Jitter is its own graphics system based on 'jitter matrices', but includes a suite of OpenGL based tools. GEM is based on OpenGL. An alternative (again OpenGL-based) dataflow ...


2

That is an interesting question but I imagine that Mac hardware developers would rather work on some Sun workstations running some crappy commercial Unix than a PC. :P Chip design is still mostly done on Unix AFAIK. For the hobbyist: You can you Eagle for PCB layout and schematics. There is (or rather was, but can be still downloaded) MiSugar for ...


2

The drivers for the TUSB3410 for Mac OS X are still in beta. You should consider contact TI about this and maybe they can try to fix your problem. Even if they aren't currently interested in pushing the Mac side, the more interest they get from Mac users the more likely they are to do something. I also found a few comments about how there are open source ...


2

If you ask your package system to install avr-libc, that should give you all you need. I use emacs as my IDE, cos, well, see username. If you want a template makefile, have a look at one of my projects on github, eg https://github.com/unixbigot/pir-lite In that repo avr-tmpl.mk is an off-the-shelf makefile library (not written by me). You include it ...


2

I found CodeLite (www.codelite.org) IDE nice and full featured; still, to program AVR microchips you need to create your own Makefile. You could try BeRTOS Wizard, which will create a BeRTOS project and related Makefiles, which you can then use with CodeLite. To flash your target, just use "make flash" and you're done. We work on Linux on a daily basis, if ...


2

You can have a look at my Processing based sketch, I used for visualizing AD7746 data. It is very simple - but perhaps just the thing you need. It takes values from the serial p√ľorts, decodes strings and generates data sets. Just contact me if you have questions.


2

I've found that DigiKey's SchemeIt editor online works quite well, with export to PDF and PNG. I wish that there was an agreed-upon exchange format for schematic diagrams, so that circuits could be moved easily from one schematic capture tool to another. I use Eagle CAD for board design, but their schematic capture tool is awkward and produces ugly ...


2

I use Omnigraffle for drawing the simple circuits I use in my Arduino classes. For circuit design, I use Eagle. It's a "real" schematic capture program (i.e. CAD program for circuits) that you can also use to produce circuit boards. Omnigraffle is great for producing really nice looking schematics, as long as they are not too complex, because it doesn't ...


2

Your makefile should compile each C file into object code, then use the linker to combine the objects with libraries. You don't need -lm for each compiled file. In your makefile, you are using $(COMPILE) as both compiler and linker, which is fine for GCC, but is probably confusing matters. all: main.hex .c.o: $(COMPILE) -c $< -o $@ .S.o: ...


2

Depending on your needs, Arduino may be a fun starter kit with lots of shields (hardware expansions) available and a huge community. Arduino has a low entry level from both a hardware and software respective and you can still write regular C/C++ with it. However, Arduino doesn't have a debugger. Recently Atmel has released AVR Studio 5, which is integrated ...


2

A BeagleBone actually is the right sort of answer. I fully understand the problem. A BeagleBoard is vastly overpowered for this job. it is inefficient and physically vulnerable. There's no technical reason you couldn't get this down to a small, reliable, compact, durable $5 adapter, with USB on one end and 3 screw terminals on the other. Such adapters ...


1

The simplest approach would be to use an Arduino or BeagleBone (or Raspberry Pi, or Intel Galileo or any number of these things) to read the sensors, buffer them, and assemble them into a serial packet which can be transmitted either directly through the onboard USB->Serial (as in the case of the Arduino or the Galileo boards), or through a simple ...


1

If you can some spare money (~$55) to buy a JTAG device (assuming you have JTAG on your board) and a fair amount of time to setup OpenOCD / GNU ARM toolchain / Eclipse IDE. This is definitely not for the faint of heart but it should give you a native OSX environment to work in. This blog post goes into the exact steps for setting it up. They use an ARM ...


1

Many years ago, my Apple Hardware Design friends (including chip designers) used to design stuff using Unix workstations. Now they use Macs (which are Unix workstations, come to think of it), and Xgrid to distribute the insanely large simulation jobs. I run LTSpice on my Mac using WINE. I also run MacSpice, EagleCAD and KiCad. Last time I checked the ...


1

I will suggest using some RIA framework (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rich_Internet_application). Strictly speaking I recommend Data Visualization framework on top of RIA framework (http://www.insideria.com/2009/12/28-rich-data-visualization-too.html). I think the best approach will be Flash. I suggest Flex or Air (if You need more desktop integration). To ...



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