Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

It sounds like you have no connectivity between your VHDL design and your manually created sheet symbol. The issue here sounds like that VHDL doesn't have 'signal harness' 'pins' (ports). While you can have a port that's a composite (record) type, all it's elements are required to have the same mode (in, out, inout). Array type have the same name and ...


0

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab As noted in comments, the transistor can be any general purpose switching transistor. The transistor must be able to handle the current necessary to activate the relay coil. The relay coil must be able to be switched on by 3.3V. The relay must be capable of switching a 16 VAC load and be ...


1

It's a solder bridge. I'm guessing that you're looking at schematic on page 37 of this document: http://www.st.com/st-web-ui/static/active/en/resource/technical/document/user_manual/DM00039084.pdf If so, then SB19 is documented in table 4.11 on page 20, under "Solder Bridges". This solder bridge allows you to add/remove the pulldown resistor on the BOOT1 ...


4

These diodes are for temperature compensation. As there is a diode connection between the Base and Emitter terminals on the transistors, to compensate for any characteristic changes with changes in temperature the diodes are put in place to match these characteristic changes. For example: Say that the voltage drop over the diodes increase due to a change ...


2

The circuit is built from two identical halves that can be considered independent. Without context it is hard to say what the function of the diodes is, but it seems an attempt to compensate for the base to emitter voltage across in the related transistor in such a way that the voltage across R4 and R1 is identical. However with the large difference in ...


1

Make the jumper be a part, and put it onto the schematic and PCB. Sparkfun have already made some bridges. I think the one you are describing is called SOLDERJUMPERTRACE in my version of their library. There are other bridges in SPARKFUN'S Eagle libraries, for example with a very narrow 'neck' of copper, so that it can be connected by default, and cut with ...


4

The diodes are meant for absorbing voltage spikes above M+ and below GND. They have to have low voltage drop to start conducting sooner then the built-in diodes. As the message says, they have to be connected between output and power rails, like this (ignore the depicted buffer): Edit: The diodes should be wired like this:


2

Normally, you put something on the PCB to connect to these components. Vias, pads, a connector, something. That something should be present on your schematics, since you'll have to use some footprint object in the PCB editor, and the component used in the schematics editor should correspond to the footprint object in the PCB editor.


3

I am not a professional PCB designer. My rule is: put all the connected electronics on the schematic. The chassis-mounted parts need nets for their connections, otherwise what will they connect to? The simplest way to achieve this is put the chassis-mounted parts on the schematic. The chassis-mount parts will need a PCB footprint for the connecting ...


0

It's definitely not Eagle, Orcad, or Altium. Each of those has their own distinctive look and characteristics, which your example differs from in a number of ways.


4

That was likely hand drawn in a graphics program. Note the irregularity of the P1 pin labels.


0

I'd download LTSpice and get to grips with how to use it. Once you have got a circuit drawn you can do transient analysis (or AC analysis) and with simple op-amp circuits get really good results. Yes, there is a steep learning curve but it has to be done if you wish to improve your repertoire - I use a different suite of simulation tools but I've used LTS ...


1

Schematics and PCB designs are two different things and have different purposes. Schematics can be used to design a circuit before you actually build it, probably in a prototype phase. When you are sure your circuit works you design a printed circuit board (PCB) to print out a board where electrical components are soldered. Here's a video that explains what ...


2

Schematic is a graphical representation of electric circuit. It shows the components and interconnects of each other which can be used for PCB Design. Where PCB Design is a technique to build a electronics device on which the real electronics component can be assembled and the functionality of the device can be tested.It also Represent the physical ...


16

Schematics: Schematics/circuit diagram conveys the electrical connection between different active and passive electrical components like resistors, capacitors, Integrated circuits IC. Schematics is readable and understandable format about the connectivity and functionality between different components. For e.g. PCB: Printed Circuit Board(PCB) is ...


8

A schematic is a circuit diagram. It uses agreed symbols to represent components and shows how they are electrically connected. A PCB design shows the copper track and hole layout of a printed circuit board and usually indicates the location of components and their values/codes with a silk screen printed layer. With a schematic diagram you can easily ...


0

It is a push-pull open-drain output comparator. It has an internal input hysteresis which eliminates output switching due to internal input noise voltage, reducing current draw. ACD's digital output comment and supercat's input exceding rail voltage comment were very informative and correct. But as far as I can tell, no manufacturer uses this symbol. Even ...



Top 50 recent answers are included