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You should determine the specifications of your T&M instruments beforehand. Prior to this advice is hard at best. This includes: Current range Current dynamic range Voltage dynamic range (Maybe you only require 230VAC measurements) Accuracy Resolution Functions: W, VA, VAR, PF, CF, etc Should the instrument take into account that currents and ...


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First off, if you used RCA to 1/4 inch phone plug adapters, you would greatly simplify your problem. As to the connectors in the amp, note that three of the nine pins don't connect to anything. So now you have six signals to play with. Pin 1 is ground; there's no trickery there. And the actual signal goes in on pin 2. If you've ever seen a 1/4 inch ...


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The components used are electrolytic capacitors. These components are unipolar or polarised, meaning that the voltage over them can't simply be reversed without the risk of destruction and even explosion if the source can supply enough current. Sound is AC. So if you want to use an electrolytic capacitor to decouple successive amplifier stages you must ...


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There is gEDA for Linux or KiCAD or eagle All three can do schematic capture & multi-sheet. They equally come with PCB layout (which you say you do not require). There is also qucs which is a circuit simulation tool and while it will draw circuits, what you draw for simulation is rarely exactly what you draw for schematic capture (no need for ...


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Eagle software is used by a lot of folks around here and runs on Linux. Although it can do PCB layout, you don 't have to pay for that or the autorouter; the schematic editor is available separately. The standrd version costs $315 and can handle 99 sheets of schematics, with cross-references.


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The basic idea is that they are in parallel, however they are possibly located at many different places on the PCB, but not always. Some schematics will show several capacitors all together in one place, and you don't really know where they are physically located. This is very common on VCC and other power lines. For very complex schematics a designer ...


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Decoupling caps need to be physically close to the pins they are decoupling. This also means every power pin needs its own decoupling cap. Since the values of all your decoupling caps are the same and are small, what you see is probably due to the IC having more than one power pin. This is common with large digital ICs, like FPGAs and microcontrollers. ...


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The thing about schematics is they do not necessarily reflect the physical layout and location of components. It is likely both capacitors are necessary but are located in different areas of the physical layout to protect each area from voltage drops and transients. More on decoupling capacitors here.


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It depends on the opamp. In the old days when we had to trudge to school barefoot in the snow uphill both ways, opamps inputs drew enough current to matter to many circuits. For such opamps, the imbalance in current between the two inputs, called the input offset current was lower than the total current drawn by each input. You could cancel out the common ...


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It it to mitigate the input leakage current of the OPAMP The OPAMP will attempt to keep the difference between + & - to equal zero. The input leakage current of the OPAMP in conjunction with gain resistors will produce a voltage at the - pin. If the + pin was tied to 0V there would now be an offset error voltage By providing a resistance to 0V (usually ...


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R1 is there to counter-act any small DC offset since the integral of any DC offset tends to infinity. These offsets can come from source errors (your source may not be exactly a sign wave) or they can be intrinsic to the Op-Amp (known as input offset voltage). edit: oh wait, you're asking about R1, not R3. Incidentally, it amused me when someone up-voted my ...


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This will work. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab The LED turns on fairly sharply at about 20 volts, and the circuit draws about 10 mA at 20 volts and about 20 mA at 28 volts.


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Sadly there is no accepted standard. As with most schematics, whatever works to convey the information best for your group is all that matters. Each tool is also going to implement hierarchical designs in different ways. Altium for example, allows you to add suffixes to reference designators. One way for you to do it would be to have R1_1, R1_2, R1_3 .. ...


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Here's my two cents 1. Break it down Break down your design into modules. Put a block diagram of the system on the first page of the schematic 2. Answer who, what, where, when, why Who - For each module page, label "who" the module connects to. Lay it out left to right so it reads like English. What - In the title, indicate what the module is. For ...


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Xilinx ISE 14.7: Design tab -> Synthesize - XST (expand node) -> View RTL Schematic. Alternative: menu Tools -> Schematic Viewer -> RTL... RTL Schematic (Register Transfer Logic) is the generic, hierarchical schematic in terms of combinational logic and flip-flops. The other choice is Technology Schematic, which shows how the logic maps to device-specific ...


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I don't know exactly what CircuitLab's designers were thinking, but Sedra and Smith have a three-part figure (number 5.11 in the 6th edition of the textbook) introducing/showing their MOSFET notation, followed by an explanation that I'll quote entirely (for a reason that will become apparent in the end): Figure 5.11(a) shows the circuit symbol for the ...


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QUICK ANSWER "NO" The others here are good and not wrong, but in short. Connected DOES NOT mean "solder together", connected means "a path exists between the two", you could use a wire, any conducting material. For example "my hard disk is connected to my computer" - it's not physically soldered to it but there is a connection Less far-fetched example ...



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