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3

The "canonical" form of a schematic diagram is a netlist. However, in order to compare two netlists, you need to make sure that the component names and the node names of the two schematics are identical, which may require setting up a mapping of some sort between the two. Then, you go through the netlist node by node, and make sure each node connects to the ...


10

Yes. You print out the two schematics and then check each component and connection manually. As you have checked each one highlight it with a yellow marker. When you get all done the whole schematic should be all yellow. Along the way keep a pink highlighter handy. Whenever you find a mistake or mismatch use that color to highlight and this will be your ...


5

See the datasheet of the diode : SBR15A30SP5 You have 3 pins for the Diode: The Left Pin and the Right Pin must be connected to the printed circuit board. In your case they are connected to the ground.


1

If it's part of the circuit, it should be in the schematic. Period. Independent and complete modules that have independent schematics don't need it (ie the lcd back light is part of the lcd on the A C pins), but if it's part of your circuit it should.


3

A schematic is an abstraction of the real circuit. We use abstractions because we want to communicate something to other people (including our future self). If what you want to tell to other people about your circuit does not involve the fuse, then it is fine to leave it out. But if you want to use your schematic as input for making a PCB and you want the ...


1

For manufacturing purposes, everything on the PCB should appear somewhere on the schematic. Where I worked this included not just the power supply and all connectors but pseudo-components for test pads, mounting holes, etc. That doesn't necessarily mean it needs to be on the same page as the core functionality, you can park it all at the end of a multi-page ...


3

Only INPUT pins on net PIN5 This error is caused by pin 14 of IC6 being labelled as an INPUT pin. The ERC has noticed that there is no corresponding OUTPUT pin connected to the PIN5 net, so it believes there is an error. Since you are building an arduino shield, you can safely ignore this error. Only one pin on net PIN5 Eagle is saying that it ...


1

It is not practical to control non-motor devices (example:siren & pump) using H-bridge IC. For simpler solution, you can use a simple transistor circuit that work as a switch. But if for a specific reason you want to control the non-motor devices using H-bridge, you can use this circuit: Note: original picture from here siren = motor 1 ...


2

You do not need a full H bridge, just a couple of relays. You can connect the purple wire to your positive power supply, while the other two wires should be connected to the negative via two separate relays. To hook a relay to an arduino just search the web, there literally are dozen of tutorials. If for some reason you want to use the H bridge you can ...


2

Just connect the source to a Vcc symbol. Make sure the name is exactly the same. Here's a simple example from this webpage where the source is a USB connector and it goes to a chip and another connector.


1

Magnet itself is not a source of energy. Electricity could be induced by moving a wire/coil in a magnetic field or moving magnetic field around the wire/coil. This tool are called a generator. Generator does not actually create electrical energy. Instead, it uses the mechanical energy supplied to it to force the movement. Typical generator uses the engine as ...


0

you can power a fan using magnet, but then you have to do a lot of work moving the magnet repeatedly. That is what a power generator does. Simplest wiring would be a wire and a magnet. You move the magnet repeatedly above that wire, and you get a tiny bit of electricity, mill-watt in precise sense. In practice, you need a powerful motor and a power source, ...


4

I would do it as with a socketed IC like you are describing. Fuse symbol to the schematic with a comment that its socketed. BoM for PCBA shows the socket for F7. [optional] The actual fuse is in the BoM for top assembly (or some higher subassembly). Plugging in the fuse is a separate operation. It's also possible that slightly different versions of ...


3

First of all, you should be looking at the voltage difference between ADC-x and ADC_Center, either by using two channels in differential mode or connecting scope ground to ADC_CENTER (with ESC power supply isolated from scope ground). ADC_CENTER is the 'virtual center point', equivalent to the center tap voltage in a star-wound motor. If your wiring is ...


6

This means that the schematic was designed with a different grid setting that the new one. Even if the grid size was the same it is possible that the origin has moved (if say you selected all and moved the group with the alt grid). With a schematic, unlike the PCB, really everything should be on a strict grid, it is only Text Labels that should be allowed ...


3

The problem is that your grid does not match the grid used to create the original schematic. ctrl+click changes to a much finer grid which will allow you to make the connections. How complicated is the schematic? If it's not too complex, you may want to redraw the entire thing using your own grid. This often happens when drawing the schematic in a metric ...


2

IEEE 315, which you've already mentioned, is also known a ANSI Y.32.2. In addition there is ANSI/IEEE Std 91/91a/991 for logic symbols. IEC 60617 (aka British Standard BS 3939) originally was used mostly for electromechanical drawings but has some electronic symbols as well and is a standard throughout Europe. This document goes over some of the ...


0

This is not an inductor, rather it is a ferrite bead with a lossy (mostly resistive) insertion impedance of 33 ohms at 100MHz. Probably like this 0805 (metric 2012) Taiyo Yuden BKP2125HS330-T part, rated at 4A and very cheap. Ferrite beads often use the inductor symbol and are actually inductive at relatively low frequencies (say under 10MHz) but behave ...


2

What you see here, is not an exact specification of a component. It is more an indication to select a component. It reads: The (complex) impedance of this inductor shall be 33 Ohms at 100 MHz. You have to select an appropriate inductor. Z = jωL is the formula to use. You should take care of some more things. As this seems to be a power line for an USB ...


1

For the 700mA (especially), I would suggest using a MOSFET rather than a simple BJT, with the LED(s) in the drain circuit. A single 700mA LED dropping 3.4V means that you are wasting 14 watts in the resistor with a 24V supply, which is pretty large (and wasteful- 85% of the energy is lost before it even gets to the LED). It would be better to use a 12V or ...


1

With a common collector configuration the output voltage can never be larger than in the input so you will be limited to the 5V output of the Arduino (minus 0.7V for the bBE junction). So the most appropriate is a common emitter. You need to control the base current with the common emitter so use a resistor from the Arduino that gives about 1/10 of the ...


0

You should put the NPN transistors on the ground side of the LEDs. As you show, they would act as emitter followers, and only apply Vcc - 0.7 volts to the LEDs. Putting several LEDs in series, with a single current-limiting resistor, is fine if you have a suitable power supply. The total forward voltages of the LEDs should be 2 - 3 volts less than the ...



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