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Simply run the following command in the schematic window: display -pins If you want to view them again: display pins As is the way with Eagle, you can also do it from the toolbar. Simply click on the visible layers/display button, find layer 93 (Pins) and hide it by clicking the number so it is no longer blue. Then click OK.


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You can use the Edit > Smart Paste function. Select all your ports, copy them (Ctrl+C) then use Edit->Smart Paste and select "Net Labels" in the dialogue. Then Altium Designer will paste net labels with the same names for you. This also works for Power Objects and busses. Take a look at the options in the dialogue or the documentation for Smart Paste....


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You must first arrive at a "Rev.0" circuit. Typically by bread-boarding it and testing it. Then you can create a schematic diagram showing the circuit, and lay out a PC board from the schematic diagram. Expect that there will be some differences (like bypass/filter capacitors, etc.) for the PC board implementation vs. the same circuit on a breadboard. I'm ...


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Here is a simplified circuit doing the same as your doing.


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/Y is a "Y safety rating" Y capacitors are usually metalised film and will be marked with class Y The other 2.2 nF capacitor need to handle several hundered volts, as hundereds of kilohertz so it is probably a high voltage ceramic capacitor, 10u 400v is probably electrolytic, the others probably solid-electrolytic if you buy the right transformer the ...


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E1/E2 are indeed electrolytics (although I would use a ceramic instead of E2 -- there's no reason to use electrolytics at that CV-point these days). C1 and C2 may be ceramic or film types. C2 is indeed a 2.2nF capacitor -- the Y is a safety rating used for mains-to-ground capacitors (i.e. it sits between the mains and something you can poke with your finger,...


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I will answer your questions in the order you asked them. 1) Yes, E1 and E2 are electrolytic capacitors designed for SMPS. They have short stubby leads for short length connections for power and ground. C1 and C2 are typical ceramic capacitors.2) 2n2/Y is 2.2nF (just a shorthand description). The "Y" marking defines it's 'safety' grade as being allowed for ...


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Are E1 and E2 electrolytic capacitors and C1 and C2 Ceramic Capacitors? E1 and E2 are polarised. electrolytic capacitors. C1 & C2 are unpolarised & could be ceramic What is the value of C2? Is it 2.2 nF? and what is the meaning of /Y next to its value? The value of C2 is 2.2nF. The Y means the safety type of capacitor. X are good across ...


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"Signal ground" is the most generic of these terms. It is used primarily when you want to distinguish it from other kinds of ground, such as safety ground or power supply return paths. "Signal return" means that the speaker is thinking particularly about how the signal current is flowing. This would come up when thinking about EMC in terms of loop area (...


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Remember, many of those who use arduinos are hobbyists, and while some of them are good electrical engineers, others are less experienced and might not produce great schematics. Firstly, you have correctly read all of the values. There are several different ways of labelling capacitors, and there are no hard and fast rules. It would be nice if the schematic-...


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In your circuit, the only two critical capacitors are those at the output of the LP2950 voltage regulator: C4 and C5. For all others you can pick whatever you want: I'd probably go with electrolytics for any polarized and cheap X7R ceramics for the rest. For the two output capacitors of the LP2950 there is an entire chapter in the data-sheet: http://www.ti....


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Cable assembly drawings are essentially mechanical drawings. The electrical connections are secondary to the mechanical construction, and are usually just listed in one or more tables (one for each connector) off in a corner somewhere. While you can use your schematic tool to generate the BOM, the primary drawing is best done in a mechanical drafting tool. ...


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I document my cables in a spread sheet. Trying to auto generate a cable diagram takes more work to generate the collateral than simply filling out a template in a spread sheet file. The organization of the spread sheet allows for nice tabular presentation of the data. Here is a sample from a recent project. (This one not fully complete as the final wire ...


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Assuming VCC5 is 5V and VCC12 is 12V, it won't work because the PMOS FETs won't turn off. To turn off they need +12V on the Gate, but the 555 only puts out +4V (leaving 8V on the Gate). Another potential problem is that you don't have any 'dead time' when switching between the upper and lower FET. During the transition both FETs will be on and a large '...


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ICLs are generally NTC thermistors, so use the thermistor symbol, as follows (there are other thermistor symbols, this one follows the European conventions):


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If the pins of the parts got properties like input, output, power, ground etc. there are some checks possible for open inputs, two outputs in the same net, unconnected power or ground pins. You may highlite a net to see what is connected to it and what not.


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Since you already proposed using a radio link for synchronization I suspect the easiest solution for the rest of the system would actually be to just get two of the common inexpensive transmitter/receiver modules that integrate the transmit and receive transducers with driver and receiver circuitry. Make one transmit coincident with (or perhaps better a ...


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Why not have the speaker and the microphone trigger after a radio pulse. Radio travels at speed of light so pretty much instantaneous. Then program the difference between the heard radio wave and the heard ultrasonic wave to be calculated by multiplying the time it takes for the second arduino to hear the sound wave by the speed of sound in air. Gives ...


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I suspect you only looked at the Absolute Maximum Ratings table. You need to look further down the datasheet to the Electrical Characteristics table on page 4 to see the actual operating conditions. That table shows a supply current of 2.8 mA typical, 4.5 mA maximum, for a Vdd of 5 volts, so the typical power consumption is 14 mW (or 0.000014 KW).


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With Altium, it's a nicely integrated environment with very tight coupling between schematic and layout aspects. Altium has a concept of component links which you can use to verify that every component on the PCB is linked to something on the PCB. Additionally, as Bence mentioned in a comment above, there are DRC and ERC rules matrices you can use to verify ...


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Since you claim you don't have access to the chip I assume the displayed schematic is from some kind of module? The ground symbol (3 horizontal bars stacked on top of each other in a triangle shape) is a graphical tool to connect all ground lines/pins with one another without drawing traces all over the schematic. So every time you see this ground symbol it ...


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The symbol with the three short horizontal lines (see below) is an indication of a GND connection. It is normally understood that all symbols like this on a schematic are tied (a.k.a. connected) together. You will note that there are also GND connections at the connectors J1 and J3. One of these can be the place you can connect in the GND from your ...


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The symbol you highlighted is the ground symbol. On a breadboard, all these symbols are attach to each other. This is the reference for the ground of your D.C. power supply. So for any voltage measurement, you take this point as the reference so the 5V point will be 5 volts higher than this reference.


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simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Figure 1. Various "ground" symbols. In most circuits there is a common rail which is used as a reference for all other points in the circuit. One of the most common examples is the automobile / car electrical systems which use the chassis as the return path to the battery negative. Most ...


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J1, J2 and J3 are reference designators for connectors (or in some cases specifically pin headers).


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The "J" stands for "jumper", although the designator is also used for off-board connectors as well as jumper pins.


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What you need is the Direct on line starter with timer. Since nothing is free in this world and everything comes with a price, get your "client" to agree to buy for you the simple starter with red+green push buttons on it and get it linked to the timer unit. This starts the load with a momentary press on the green button and it drops the load off during ...


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You have all of the address pins constantly held low giving the address 0000, you have all of the data bits held low except for bit 1 giving a nibble (or word in the datasheet) of 0001. Using !ME and !WE (to replace the overscore notatation used for active low in the datasheet) - you have !ME always low, and (hopefully) can toggle !WE low by closing the ...


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This is a memory IC, so it remembers the state of D1-D4 when ME is low and you pulse WE low. The leds that should be OFF are R1, R2, and R3. R4 should be ON. To change which LED's are ON you need to change the state of the memory inputs (D1-D4), then bring WE low then high again and see the change. The data outputs of this IC are inverted, so to turn an LED '...


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Your client needs a start-stop contactor and timer. Press the green button to switch on power. When power goes off contactor will drop out. When power comes back on start the timer. When time reached press green button. It has an off button too.


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This is a very simple thing to do with a small microcontroller. The on and off buttons would be just inputs to the micro. The micro would sense AC power via a opto-coupler and control a relay that switches the AC on/off to the equipment. Even a small PIC with internal oscillator can do this easily. Of course if your client can't even afford a "smart ...



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