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There is no difference. Many times the choice of where to draw the bubble is made as to where the signal level is active low. As such the symbols that you show can be implemented with the same circuit or chip. In similar manner experienced engineers will also choose to draw other logic gates on the schematic according to the actual usage as to where the ...


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Use another multiplexer to read the 8 ID switches, selected by the same 3 bits as the others and with its output going to a single digital I/O pin. That should save 7 pins, leaving 3 spare for other things that you haven't thought of yet. You could use a digital multiplexer such as MC74HC151 or 74HC251, but it might be cheaper and easier to just use ...


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There is a free and open-source CAD package called LibreCAD. It may do what you want, if AutoCAD is what you're expecting.


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You do can multi-channel in Altium, using the sheet symbol. You create a schematic with ports representing the inputs and outputs to your repeating circuit, then place those on your main sheet, connecting up your ports. When you create your PCB, those circuits will be placed in 'rooms', which you can then setup a single room, then copy it to the other ...


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For a very large number of copies use hierarchical design techniques to create rooms repeating circuit blocks a large number of times. After aranging rooms, then you can use Tools >> Rooms >> Copy Room Formats to make them all the same very rapidly. This copies everything about the previous template room including component orientations, tracks, vias, ...


5

I remember seeing a similar question here (but couldn't find it). The component seems to be a transmission gate, or analog switch. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmission_gate) Google-ing it helps you find the schematic: https://www.google.hu/search?q=transmission+gate+symbol


1

In the LT8309 data sheet there is this diagram of a 12V 5A converter: - Clearly there are several differences between the LTSpice circuit and the data sheet (subtle value differences it seems) but does this make LTSpice's simulation files any less reliable than the actual model of an op-amp in (say) TINA or any other simulation software? I don't think so ...


2

According to my experiences, all simulator are just simulator, they rely on how precise your models are, and how precise your circuits are, such as if you take all the parasitic factors into consideration. This is particularly true for power supply designs. In my opinion, LT's demo design (not just LTSpice demo circuit, i mean demos with demo board) usually ...


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3rd one doesn't work as XOR. Look at case A=0, B=0: Upper right MOSFET (p-channel) is turned ON. This yields 1 at the output which is wrong. Also look at case A=0, B=1: Upper left MOSFET (p-channel) is turned ON, which makes source of lower right MOSFET (n-channel) high. Gate of lower right MOSFET (n-channel) is high but its source is also high. N-channel ...


2

From the CD74HCT4051 datasheet: IIL (Control input leakage current): ±0.1μA Err... that's not going to light up the LED. Unless you have superhuman vision. Put the LED in parallel with the MUX instead. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab


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Yes VCC on the chip is for 5V; 4.5 to 5.5V is the recommended operating range in the datasheet. The chip you referenced has 8 inputs and 8 outputs; effectively 8 channels. They are grouped into two sets of four channels, where each set of four can be enabled independently via separate active-low output enable signals. That means you connect either output ...


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My answer, too, is that it's a differential pair and that it carries no relevance how many "loops" you see in the schematic. If there were more "loops", it just would be more difficult to read - now you can trace e.g. the signal on pin 31 to the topmost pin of the differential driver on the left, so it's clear that pin 31 goes to the positive drive and pin ...


8

It's a differential pair. I'm surprised at the strange answers and arguments regarding twisted pairs and LVDS and things of that sort. Differential pairs are notated symbolically as twisted pairs because, at a macroscopic level, that's how they're carried (think Ethernet, HDMI, USB, Firewire -- all use twisted-pair cables). And visually, it describes the ...


3

I think it suggests "twisted pair", but does not positively imply it. Basically, the idea with twisting pairs of wires is that the amount of noise picked a wire loop will pick up from a given direction can be approximated by projecting the wires onto a plane which is perpendicular to that direction (imagine moving the wires perpendicular to the plane until ...


7

In this context it means the output of the module on the left is differential (versus single ended output). In other words, the output level isn't referenced to a common ground but to each other, a complementary pair. To get the output value you subtract the two signals. Differential pairs are less susceptible to noise. You can read more about it here. I ...


11

To me it looks lite a twisted pair. It must be a LVDS transmitter on the left.


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Depending on your load conditions, it may be possible to simply put two large high-power diodes in series with the supply output. The drop in the diodes will vary somewhat with load conditions, but if the load is somewhat constant, and most importantly if the load does not drop to zero, this could be good enough. There will also be a temperature coefficient ...


1

Using a 7812 as a variable regulator is a little unusual, but technically there's nothing wrong with it ... The easiest solution to your question is to replace the 7812 with a 7810. You could probably get away with leaving the 680 ohm resistor and 470 ohm pot at the same values if you can live with a little less maximum output. There are a few issues in ...


2

You're using a linear regulator to get 5V from 27V- further the regulator is only rated at 30V abs max. If the 5V relay draws only 25mA and the rest of the circuit 10mA you've got 750mW dissipation in the regulator - could be a problem. Turn the LEDs all on and you may have several watts. Maybe consider a 24V relay with a series resistor or LED (flyback ...


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Here is another site with electronics design tutorial including schematics design and PCB design http://appliedelectronicsengineering.blogspot.de i hope it helps


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I normally choose one of these two options: Draw the sensor as a schematic symbol and have a footprint for the desired connector. The only problem is that the BOM is not complete then (you can either have the sensor or the connector). Draw a symbol for the connector with two connections for each lead in the schematic symbol (so you draw one "symbol" with ...


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In Altium, there are different types of components defined: "Graphical" parts are included on the schematic but it isn't checked by DRC and isn't added to the BOM or netlist, so it doesnt' appear in the layout. "Mechanical" parts are included on the BOM, but not the netlist. You can make your part either Graphical or Mechanical depending whether you ...



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