1,032 reputation
312
bio website KBEmbedded.com
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Apr 27 at 18:31

ERR


Feb
16
answered Difference between Hertz and Duty Cycle
Feb
4
comment Is there a way to disable an UART terminal?
I agree with sending breaks. Send a stream of breaks, and reset the power, thats going to be the cleanest way unless you add in some sort of buffer on the slave side to prevent this from happening in the future.
Feb
4
revised Can I use the 32.768 kHz output from a RTC instead of an external oscillator on a PIC MCU?
Added more information.
Feb
4
comment Can I use the 32.768 kHz output from a RTC instead of an external oscillator on a PIC MCU?
Oh, good catch about the OD output. I didn't notice that while skimming the datasheet.
Feb
4
answered Can I use the 32.768 kHz output from a RTC instead of an external oscillator on a PIC MCU?
Feb
3
comment Finding an RFID Reader that reads at 1 meter
@DerekHalden Quick searching on the googles returned products with no pricing, meaning its likely going to be at least $200 for a transceiver capable of that range. I don't know enough about HF antenna characteristics to know the effective angle, I just assume its going to be narrow and focused to get the most power transfer possible.
Feb
3
comment Finding an RFID Reader that reads at 1 meter
My knowledge of RFID is in the LF range, so please do not take everything I say at face value. Based on what I know, you might be able to find passive tags that can work at 1 m range. However the transceiver hardware has to be able to send that much energy that far and be able to see it deflected back. Means narrow range of operation and high power. You are looking at very expensive off the shelf hardware to make it happen either way. Using an active tag would be more efficient. As for Ardunio, as long as the transceiver can output something the Arduino can handle, you can interface them.
Feb
1
comment Determine torque required to operate manual adjustable height desk
Do you actually have the desk to test on, or is this theoretical?
Jan
18
awarded  Yearling
Oct
1
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
26
comment Is it true that a SD/MMC Card does wear levelling with its own controller?
@fredbasset Generally, if linux gets bad data, it has a fit. The company I work for has implemented a checksumming process directly on the block device that goes through a software layer. Data recovery and errors are now able to be reported to the kernel through that setup. Raw NAND is its own beast, but from what I've experienced it is more robust in terms of handling faults. Check out UBI and UBIFS, its basically JFFS3, really robust and offers some speedups.
Jun
13
comment Is it true that a SD/MMC Card does wear levelling with its own controller?
@fredbasset, way to zombie the thread ;) Its been a while since I did any SD card work. However, IIRC SD cards themselves will physically return whatever they feel like. Some of the newer ones combined with decent drivers may be able to detect an IO error. However may of the older SD cards will just return bad data that was stored in NAND and call it good. Though, if a write is not able to complete, that will return an IO error.
Mar
4
awarded  Caucus
Jan
18
awarded  Yearling
Dec
16
comment Li-ion and Li-po charger current leak from input pin
Does the manual mention any leakage of those pins?
Dec
16
comment How is an XOR with more than 2 inputs supposed to work?
Good clarification, thank you for putting the time in on researching the standards far more than I had.
Dec
15
comment How is an XOR with more than 2 inputs supposed to work?
@JoeHass, I've never used logisim, I primarily use LogicWorks; in which, a multi-input XOR behaves as I described above, odd number of true inputs is a true output. The wiki page on XOR (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XOR) agrees that what I said is true as well. I also have never actually seen a multi-input XOR IC, so I cannot turn to datasheets to try and disprove what I said. Logisim seems to be the only thing that implements the multi-input XOR scheme with the logic "1 if and only..." If you can find another source, I will admit I am wrong and that there are multiple definitions of XOR.
Dec
15
comment How is an XOR with more than 2 inputs supposed to work?
There is no different point of view, both points are technically correct, however "1 if only if exactly one of the inputs is a 1" doesn't expand as you might think. When you cascade 2input XORs, each output feeding in to the pins of a third XOR this shows the above point. Multi-input gates are derived from their 2input primitives. Thus the 4input truth table is ((A⊕B)⊕(C⊕D)) which results in a final 1 output if there are an odd number of true inputs.
Dec
15
comment How is an XOR with more than 2 inputs supposed to work?
@root, actually, you asked "How should it behave?" You didn't ask why anywhere. This is a correct answer, it yields ((A⊕B)⊕(C⊕D)) which is the same as a 4input XOR, which is the same as multiple 2input XORs cascaded together.