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Vertical resistors are a bit messy and can short if they are pushed over. For the same reason they're less resistant to vibration (for example they would probably be inappropriate in an automotive or aerospace application).

In large quantities, vertical resistors are available preformed (bulk or in tape and reel or ammo pack), some even have the long lead dipped in lacquer (like the body) so they can't short as easily. They're still pretty popular in the low end of production, and they can be stuffed by machine. Photo here: enter image description here

If vibration isn't an issue, there's really little reason why you shouldn't do this, with care to avoid possible shorting. You could always sleeve the long lead if there looks to be an issue.

Keep in mind that in most cases you'll be far better off to use a surface mount resistor. You can start with something huge like 0805 (or even 1206) until you get used to them. Compare sizes here.

SMT resistors sizes I gave above are based in measurements in mils (0805 is 80mils by 50mils or about 2mm x 1.27mm). The metric equivalent of 0805 is 2012. I would NOT suggest that you start with these new Rohm parts, which are metric 03015 (0.3mm x 0.15mm). Several million will fit in a 1" cube, and they are close to being an inhalation hazard.

Vertical resistors are a bit messy and can short if they are pushed over. For the same reason they're less resistant to vibration (for example they would probably be inappropriate in an automotive or aerospace application).

In large quantities, vertical resistors are available preformed (bulk or in tape and reel or ammo pack), some even have the long lead dipped in lacquer (like the body) so they can't short as easily. They're still pretty popular in the low end of production, and they can be stuffed by machine. Photo here:

If vibration isn't an issue, there's really little reason why you shouldn't do this, with care to avoid possible shorting. You could always sleeve the long lead if there looks to be an issue.

Keep in mind that in most cases you'll be far better off to use a surface mount resistor. You can start with something huge like 0805 (or even 1206) until you get used to them. Compare sizes here.

Vertical resistors are a bit messy and can short if they are pushed over. For the same reason they're less resistant to vibration (for example they would probably be inappropriate in an automotive or aerospace application).

In large quantities, vertical resistors are available preformed (bulk or in tape and reel or ammo pack), some even have the long lead dipped in lacquer (like the body) so they can't short as easily. They're still pretty popular in the low end of production, and they can be stuffed by machine. Photo here: enter image description here

If vibration isn't an issue, there's really little reason why you shouldn't do this, with care to avoid possible shorting. You could always sleeve the long lead if there looks to be an issue.

Keep in mind that in most cases you'll be far better off to use a surface mount resistor. You can start with something huge like 0805 (or even 1206) until you get used to them. Compare sizes here.

SMT resistors sizes I gave above are based in measurements in mils (0805 is 80mils by 50mils or about 2mm x 1.27mm). The metric equivalent of 0805 is 2012. I would NOT suggest that you start with these new Rohm parts, which are metric 03015 (0.3mm x 0.15mm). Several million will fit in a 1" cube, and they are close to being an inhalation hazard.

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source | link

Vertical resistors are a bit messy and can short if they are pushed over. For the same reason they're less resistant to vibration (for example they would probably be inappropriate in an automotive or aerospace application).

In large quantities, vertical resistors are available preformed (bulk or in tape and reel or ammo pack), some even have the long lead dipped in lacquer (like the body) so they can't short as easily. They're still pretty popular in the low end of production, and they can be stuffed by machine. Photo here:

If vibration isn't an issue, there's really little reason why you shouldn't do this, with care to avoid possible shorting. You could always sleeve the long lead if there looks to be an issue.

Keep in mind that in most cases you'll be far better off to use a surface mount resistor. You can start with something huge like 0805 (or even 1206) until you get used to them. Compare sizes here.