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If you are using a microcontroller then you can implement at least halfsome of what you're looking for just in firmware. Namely, the automatic low voltage cut-out is known as brown-out and is something you can set fuses for on the AVR chip itself in which a RESET event will be triggered. However, andyou might look into a latching circuit that could be switched off when a RESET occurs. See page 47 in the datasheet.

The blinking LED is about the simplest program you can write. Once low-voltage is detected, either through brown-out (which I think may have special features but I can't recall) or ADC, drive an LED with PWM and a timer if you want it to blink. If you simply want an indicator then just drive the LED high and forget about it.

If you are using a microcontroller then you can implement at least half of what you're looking for just in firmware. Namely, the automatic low voltage cut-out is known as brown-out and is something you can set fuses for on the AVR chip itself, and the blinking LED is about the simplest program you can write. Once low-voltage is detected, either through brown-out (which I think may have special features but I can't recall) or ADC, drive an LED with PWM and a timer if you want it to blink. If you simply want an indicator then just drive the LED high and forget about it.

If you are using a microcontroller then you can implement some of what you're looking for just in firmware. Namely, the automatic low voltage cut-out is known as brown-out and is something you can set fuses for on the AVR chip itself in which a RESET event will be triggered. However, you might look into a latching circuit that could be switched off when a RESET occurs. See page 47 in the datasheet.

The blinking LED is about the simplest program you can write. Once low-voltage is detected, either through brown-out or ADC, drive an LED with PWM and a timer if you want it to blink. If you simply want an indicator then just drive the LED high and forget about it.

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If you are using a microcontroller then you can implement at least half of what you're looking for just in firmware. Namely, the automatic low voltage cut-out is known as brown-out and is something you can set fuses for on the AVR chip itself, and the blinking LED is about the simplest program you can write. Once low-voltage is detected, either through brown-out (which I think may have special features but I can't recall) or ADC, drive an LED with PWM and a timer if you want it to blink. If you simply want an indicator then just drive the LED high and forget about it.