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TemperatureThe temperature limit associated with an actual IC arehas more todoto do with thermal expansion/retraction than things like melting  .

An IC is made up of different materials. The die, the substrate, the bondwires, the bonding method, the legs and the body.

  As the temperature changes, these different t materials expand/contract and will rip apart from other materials not changing at the same rate.

You then have quality of doping, more of a problem at the edge of the wafer, that. That means an actual characteristics against the data sheet (rise time, propagation delay.., etc.) do not meet the stated minminimum/maxmaximum as the mobility of the electrons are different ( what manufacturersmanufacturers usually do is make an IC, and test at military temp, iftemperature. If it fails, test at industrial, if it temperature. If that also fails, test at a commercial temperature... If it fails, they scrap it and add it to their yield numbers).

Then you have the specifics of damage... Silicon does not have a lower limit w.r.t. semiconducting. It does have an upper limit at 175175 °C where it will be damaged.

LCD'sLCDs will form crystals and break down at extreme tempstemperatures and equally dielectrics in capacitors start to break down.

Temperature limit associated with actual IC are more todo with thermal expansion/retraction than things like melting  

An IC is made up of different materials. The die, the substrate, the bondwires, the bonding method, the legs and the body.

  As the temperature changes these different t materials expand/contract and will rip apart from other materials not changing at the same rate

You then have quality of doping, more of a problem at the edge of the wafer, that means an actual characteristics against the data sheet (rise time, propagation delay...) do not meet the stated min/max as the mobility of the electrons are different ( what manufacturers usually do is make an IC, test at military temp, if it fails, test at industrial, if it fails test at commercial... If it fails scrap and add to their yield numbers)

Then you have the specifics of damage... Silicon does not have a lower limit w.r.t. semiconducting. It does have an upper at 175 where it will be damaged.

LCD's will form crystals and break down at extreme temps and equally dielectrics in capacitors start to break down

The temperature limit associated with an actual IC has more to do with thermal expansion/retraction than things like melting.

An IC is made up of different materials. The die, the substrate, the bondwires, the bonding method, the legs and the body. As the temperature changes, these different materials expand/contract and will rip apart from other materials not changing at the same rate.

You then have quality of doping, more of a problem at the edge of the wafer. That means an actual characteristics against the data sheet (rise time, propagation delay, etc.) do not meet the stated minimum/maximum as the mobility of the electrons are different (manufacturers usually make an IC and test at military temperature. If it fails, test at industrial temperature. If that also fails, test at a commercial temperature... If it fails, they scrap it and add it to their yield numbers).

Then you have the specifics of damage... Silicon does not have a lower limit w.r.t. semiconducting. It does have an upper limit at 175 °C where it will be damaged.

LCDs will form crystals and break down at extreme temperatures and equally dielectrics in capacitors start to break down.

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source | link

Temperature limit associated with actual IC are more todo with thermal expansion/retraction than things like melting

An IC is made up of different materials. The die, the substrate, the bondwires, the bonding method, the legs and the body.

As the temperature changes these different t materials expand/contract and will rip apart from other materials not changing at the same rate

You then have quality of doping, more of a problem at the edge of the wafer, that means an actual characteristics against the data sheet (rise time, propagation delay...) do not meet the stated min/max as the mobility of the electrons are different ( what manufacturers usually do is make an IC, test at military temp, if it fails, test at industrial, if it fails test at commercial... If it fails scrap and add to their yield numbers)

Then you have the specifics of damage... Silicon does not have a lower limit w.r.t. semiconducting. It does have an upper at 175 where it will be damaged.

LCD's will form crystals and break down at extreme temps and equally dielectrics in capacitors start to break down