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Things oscillate according to sine and cosine. Mechanical, electrical, acoustical, you name it. Hang a mass on a spring and it will bounce up and down at its resonant frequency according to the sine function. An LC circuit will behave the same way, just with currents and voltages instead of velocity and force.

A sinewave consists of a single frequency component, and other waveforms can be built up from adding up multiple different sinewaves. You can see the frequency components in a signal by looking at it on a spectrum analyzer. Since a spectrum analyzer sweeps a narrow filter over the frequency range you're looking at, you will see a peak at each frequency that the signal contains. For a sinewave, you will see 1 peak. For a square wave, you will see peaks a f, 3f, 5f, 7f, etc.

Sine and cosine are also the projection of things that rotate. Take an AC generator, for example. An AC generator spins a magnet around next to a coil of wire. As the magnet rotates, the field that impinges upon the coil due to the magnet will vary according to the sine of the shaft angle, generating a voltage across the coil that is also proportional to the sine function.

Things oscillate according to sine and cosine. Mechanical, electrical, acoustical, you name it. Hang a mass on a spring and it will bounce up and down at its resonant frequency according to the sine function. An LC circuit will behave the same way, just with currents and voltages instead of velocity and force.

A sinewave consists of a single frequency component, and other waveforms can be built up from adding up multiple different sinewaves. You can see the frequency components in a signal by looking at it on a spectrum analyzer. Since a spectrum analyzer sweeps a narrow filter over the frequency range you're looking at, you will see a peak at each frequency that the signal contains. For a sinewave, you will see 1 peak. For a square wave, you will see peaks a f, 3f, 5f, 7f, etc.

Things oscillate according to sine and cosine. Mechanical, electrical, acoustical, you name it. Hang a mass on a spring and it will bounce up and down at its resonant frequency according to the sine function. An LC circuit will behave the same way, just with currents and voltages instead of velocity and force.

A sinewave consists of a single frequency component, and other waveforms can be built up from adding up multiple different sinewaves. You can see the frequency components in a signal by looking at it on a spectrum analyzer. Since a spectrum analyzer sweeps a narrow filter over the frequency range you're looking at, you will see a peak at each frequency that the signal contains. For a sinewave, you will see 1 peak. For a square wave, you will see peaks a f, 3f, 5f, 7f, etc.

Sine and cosine are also the projection of things that rotate. Take an AC generator, for example. An AC generator spins a magnet around next to a coil of wire. As the magnet rotates, the field that impinges upon the coil due to the magnet will vary according to the sine of the shaft angle, generating a voltage across the coil that is also proportional to the sine function.

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Things oscillate according to sine and cosine. Mechanical, electrical, acoustical, you name it. Hang a mass on a spring and it will bounce up and down at its resonant frequency according to the sine function. An LC circuit will behave the same way, just with currents and voltages instead of velocity and force.

A sinewave consists of a single frequency component, and other waveforms can be built up from adding up multiple different sinewaves. You can see the frequency components in a signal by looking at it on a spectrum analyzer. Since a spectrum analyzer sweeps a narrow filter over the frequency range you're looking at, you will see a peak at each frequency that the signal contains. For a sinewave, you will see 1 peak. For a square wave, you will see peaks a f, 3f, 5f, 7f, etc.