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If you are making your own boards, then you want traces as large as you can get by with -- perhaps 15 mils (0.015") for signal traces, and 30 mils for power. Note: with traces that large, you will typically have to narrow the traces down a bit before connecting to IC's pins with fine pitch pads.

If you are having a board house make your boards, then you can use smaller traces for signal traces, say 8 or 10 mils if you have room. Most PCB fabricators that do fast and inexpensive boards have a minimum trace width of 5 or 6 mils, but if you can go a little larger, the better. (For military and other high-tech boards, they can now go as small as 2.5 mils or even smaller.)

For power traces, then I agree with other posts that you should use a trace width calculator like this one. I generally end up using 20 or 25 mil traces for power rails. But the calculator will give you ridiculously small trace widths for signal traces that might carry only a few milliamps.

Note that in addition to trace widths, you will also want to space your traces apart, typically by the same distance as the trace width.

You can enter these rules such as minimum trace widths and minimum distances between traces, between traces and vias etc. into Design Rule Checks in programs like Eagle layout software, and when you run a DRC the program will point out violations.

If you are making your own boards, then you want traces as large as you can get by with -- perhaps 15 mils (0.015") for signal traces, and 30 mils for power. Note: with traces that large, you will typically have to narrow the traces down a bit before connecting to IC's pins with fine pitch pads.

If you are having a board house make your boards, then you can use smaller traces for signal traces, say 8 or 10 mils if you have room. Most PCB fabricators that do fast and inexpensive boards have a minimum trace width of 5 or 6 mils, but if you can go a little larger, the better. (For military and other high-tech boards, they can now go as small as 2.5 mils or even smaller.)

For power traces, then I agree with other posts that you should use a trace width calculator like this one. I generally end up using 20 or 25 mil traces for power rails. But the calculator will give you ridiculously small trace widths for signal traces that might carry only a few milliamps.

Note that in addition to trace widths, you will also want to space your traces apart, typically by the same distance as the trace width.

If you are making your own boards, then you want traces as large as you can get by with -- perhaps 15 mils (0.015") for signal traces, and 30 mils for power. Note: with traces that large, you will typically have to narrow the traces down a bit before connecting to IC's pins with fine pitch pads.

If you are having a board house make your boards, then you can use smaller traces for signal traces, say 8 or 10 mils if you have room. Most PCB fabricators that do fast and inexpensive boards have a minimum trace width of 5 or 6 mils, but if you can go a little larger, the better. (For military and other high-tech boards, they can now go as small as 2.5 mils or even smaller.)

For power traces, then I agree with other posts that you should use a trace width calculator like this one. I generally end up using 20 or 25 mil traces for power rails. But the calculator will give you ridiculously small trace widths for signal traces that might carry only a few milliamps.

Note that in addition to trace widths, you will also want to space your traces apart, typically by the same distance as the trace width.

You can enter these rules such as minimum trace widths and minimum distances between traces, between traces and vias etc. into Design Rule Checks in programs like Eagle layout software, and when you run a DRC the program will point out violations.

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If you are making your own boards, then you want traces as large as you can get by with -- perhaps 15 mils (0.015") for signal traces, and 30 mils for power. Note: with traces that large, you will typically have to narrow the traces down a bit before connecting to IC's pins with fine pitch pads.

If you are having a board house make your boards, then you can use smaller traces for signal traces, say 8 or 10 mils if you have room. Most PCB fabricators that do fast and inexpensive boards have a minimum trace width of 5 or 6 mils, but if you can go a little larger, the better. (For military and other high-tech boards, they can now go as small as 2.5 mils or even smaller.)

For power traces, then I agree with other posts that you should use a trace width calculator like this one. I generally end up using 20 or 25 mil traces for power rails. But the calculator will give you ridiculously small trace widths for signal traces that might carry only a few milliamps.

Note that in addition to trace widths, you will also want to space your traces apart, typically by the same distance as the trace width.

If you are making your own boards, then you want traces as large as you can get by with -- perhaps 15 mils (0.015") for signal traces, and 30 mils for power. Note: with traces that large, you will typically have to narrow the traces down a bit before connecting to IC's pins with fine pitch pads.

If you are having a board house make your boards, then you can use smaller traces for signal traces, say 8 or 10 mils. Most PCB fabricators that do fast and inexpensive boards have a minimum trace width of 5 or 6 mils, but if you can go a little larger, the better. (For military and other high-tech boards, they can now go as small as 2.5 mils or even smaller.)

For power traces, then I agree with other posts that you should use a trace width calculator like this one. I generally end up using 20 or 25 mil traces for power rails. But the calculator will give you ridiculously small trace widths for signal traces that might carry only a few milliamps.

If you are making your own boards, then you want traces as large as you can get by with -- perhaps 15 mils (0.015") for signal traces, and 30 mils for power. Note: with traces that large, you will typically have to narrow the traces down a bit before connecting to IC's pins with fine pitch pads.

If you are having a board house make your boards, then you can use smaller traces for signal traces, say 8 or 10 mils if you have room. Most PCB fabricators that do fast and inexpensive boards have a minimum trace width of 5 or 6 mils, but if you can go a little larger, the better. (For military and other high-tech boards, they can now go as small as 2.5 mils or even smaller.)

For power traces, then I agree with other posts that you should use a trace width calculator like this one. I generally end up using 20 or 25 mil traces for power rails. But the calculator will give you ridiculously small trace widths for signal traces that might carry only a few milliamps.

Note that in addition to trace widths, you will also want to space your traces apart, typically by the same distance as the trace width.

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If you are making your own boards, then you want traces as large as you can get by with -- perhaps 15 mils (0.015") for signal traces, and 30 mils for power. Note: with traces that large, you will typically have to narrow the traces down a bit before connecting to IC's pins with fine pitch pads.

If you are having a board house make your boards, then you can use smaller traces for signal traces, say 8 or 10 mils. Most PCB fabricators that do fast and inexpensive boards have a minimum trace width of 5 or 6 mils, but if you can go a little larger, the better. (For military and other high-tech boards, they can now go as small as 2.5 mils or even smaller.)

For power traces, then I agree with other posts that you should use a trace width calculator like this one. I generally end up using 20 or 25 mil traces for power rails. But the calculator will give you ridiculously small trace widths for signal traces that might carry only a few milliamps.