3 making my question clearer.
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Passively cutting down Reducing the voltage into a high power signalspeaker passively

Well not high power, low resistance. I have an unusual situation where I am directly driving speakers from an oscillating signal ( its not audio its more like a buzz )

I only have 2 inputs

  • 12v
  • square wave signal that oscillates at audio frequencies between 0v and 12v ( not open circuit and ground )

so the speaker basically sees a negative signal which is no problem in this situation and I block too much current with a capacitor.

Ideally though I would like to reduce the voltage to make it quieter, so I have gone through the following ideas.

  • Cant use resistors as they would have to be low resistance = heat and power!
  • diodes in series work but to get down to a good voltage I need about 10+ diodes
  • I tried a LM317 but it has ripple protection? It was too quiet

I know ideally if I had a steady 0v it would be easy, but does anyone have any other ideas I could use? or perhaps I am doing something futile?

Ok edit:

I am not making sense , the title makes no sense sorry so I corrected it.

clear info

I am driving an 8 ohm speaker off a circuit that drives LEDs.

It supplies 12v and another connection between 0v and 12v that pwm fades the led at audio frequencies.

I can't touch the circuit driving it and I want to passively cut down the voltage to reduce the volume on the speaker as it is fairly loud.

Ideally with not too much concentrated heat.

What is the best way to do it?

Passively cutting down a high power signal

Well not high power, low resistance. I have an unusual situation where I am directly driving speakers from an oscillating signal ( its not audio its more like a buzz )

I only have 2 inputs

  • 12v
  • square wave signal that oscillates at audio frequencies between 0v and 12v ( not open circuit and ground )

so the speaker basically sees a negative signal which is no problem in this situation and I block too much current with a capacitor.

Ideally though I would like to reduce the voltage to make it quieter, so I have gone through the following ideas.

  • Cant use resistors as they would have to be low resistance = heat and power!
  • diodes in series work but to get down to a good voltage I need about 10+ diodes
  • I tried a LM317 but it has ripple protection? It was too quiet

I know ideally if I had a steady 0v it would be easy, but does anyone have any other ideas I could use? or perhaps I am doing something futile?

Reducing the voltage into a speaker passively

Well not high power, low resistance. I have an unusual situation where I am directly driving speakers from an oscillating signal ( its not audio its more like a buzz )

I only have 2 inputs

  • 12v
  • square wave signal that oscillates at audio frequencies between 0v and 12v ( not open circuit and ground )

so the speaker basically sees a negative signal which is no problem in this situation and I block too much current with a capacitor.

Ideally though I would like to reduce the voltage to make it quieter, so I have gone through the following ideas.

  • Cant use resistors as they would have to be low resistance = heat and power!
  • diodes in series work but to get down to a good voltage I need about 10+ diodes
  • I tried a LM317 but it has ripple protection? It was too quiet

I know ideally if I had a steady 0v it would be easy, but does anyone have any other ideas I could use? or perhaps I am doing something futile?

Ok edit:

I am not making sense , the title makes no sense sorry so I corrected it.

clear info

I am driving an 8 ohm speaker off a circuit that drives LEDs.

It supplies 12v and another connection between 0v and 12v that pwm fades the led at audio frequencies.

I can't touch the circuit driving it and I want to passively cut down the voltage to reduce the volume on the speaker as it is fairly loud.

Ideally with not too much concentrated heat.

What is the best way to do it?

2 deleted 90 characters in body
source | link

Well not high power, low resistance. I have an unusual situation where I am directly driving speakers from an oscillating signal ( its not audio its more like a buzz )

I only have 2 inputs

  • 12v
  • square wave signal that oscillates at audio frequencies between 0v and 12v ( not open circuit and ground )

so the speaker basically sees a negative signal which is no problem in this situation and I block too much current with a capacitor.

Ideally though I would like to reduce the voltage to make it quieter, so I have gone through the following ideas.

  • Cant use resistors as they would have to be low resistance = heat and power!
  • diodes in series work but to get down to a good voltage I need about 10+ diodes
  • I tried a LM317 but it has ripple protection? It was too quiet

I know ideally if I had a steady 0v it would be easy, but does anyone have any other ideas I could use? or perhaps I am doing something futile?

Other ideas I had are

  • Zener diodes
  • transformer? will distort square wave?

Well not high power, low resistance. I have an unusual situation where I am directly driving speakers from an oscillating signal ( its not audio its more like a buzz )

I only have 2 inputs

  • 12v
  • square wave signal that oscillates at audio frequencies between 0v and 12v ( not open circuit and ground )

so the speaker basically sees a negative signal which is no problem in this situation and I block too much current with a capacitor.

Ideally though I would like to reduce the voltage to make it quieter, so I have gone through the following ideas.

  • Cant use resistors as they would have to be low resistance = heat and power!
  • diodes in series work but to get down to a good voltage I need about 10+ diodes
  • I tried a LM317 but it has ripple protection? It was too quiet

I know ideally if I had a steady 0v it would be easy, but does anyone have any other ideas I could use? or perhaps I am doing something futile?

Other ideas I had are

  • Zener diodes
  • transformer? will distort square wave?

Well not high power, low resistance. I have an unusual situation where I am directly driving speakers from an oscillating signal ( its not audio its more like a buzz )

I only have 2 inputs

  • 12v
  • square wave signal that oscillates at audio frequencies between 0v and 12v ( not open circuit and ground )

so the speaker basically sees a negative signal which is no problem in this situation and I block too much current with a capacitor.

Ideally though I would like to reduce the voltage to make it quieter, so I have gone through the following ideas.

  • Cant use resistors as they would have to be low resistance = heat and power!
  • diodes in series work but to get down to a good voltage I need about 10+ diodes
  • I tried a LM317 but it has ripple protection? It was too quiet

I know ideally if I had a steady 0v it would be easy, but does anyone have any other ideas I could use? or perhaps I am doing something futile?

1
source | link

Passively cutting down a high power signal

Well not high power, low resistance. I have an unusual situation where I am directly driving speakers from an oscillating signal ( its not audio its more like a buzz )

I only have 2 inputs

  • 12v
  • square wave signal that oscillates at audio frequencies between 0v and 12v ( not open circuit and ground )

so the speaker basically sees a negative signal which is no problem in this situation and I block too much current with a capacitor.

Ideally though I would like to reduce the voltage to make it quieter, so I have gone through the following ideas.

  • Cant use resistors as they would have to be low resistance = heat and power!
  • diodes in series work but to get down to a good voltage I need about 10+ diodes
  • I tried a LM317 but it has ripple protection? It was too quiet

I know ideally if I had a steady 0v it would be easy, but does anyone have any other ideas I could use? or perhaps I am doing something futile?

Other ideas I had are

  • Zener diodes
  • transformer? will distort square wave?