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In many (most??, all??) microcontrollers that I have used over the past years, there where sometimes some silicon level bugs, and the manufacturers provide the engineers with the errata sheets, describing what unexpected behaviour they may face.

My question: Why don't they neverever fix these "bugs"? Since the product is still produced, and in most cases solving the problem won't affect the previous implementations, why they do not just revise it? In many cases the product may be stabilized, most bugbugs may have been found, and may have a significant part of its productproduct life-time ahead of it.

Is it so difficult (technically)? Expensive?

In many (most??, all??) microcontrollers that I have used over the past years, there where sometimes some silicon level bugs, and the manufacturers provide the engineers with the errata sheets, describing what unexpected behaviour they may face.

My question: Why they never fix these "bugs"? Since the product is still produced, and in most cases solving the problem won't affect the previous implementations, why they do not just revise it? In many cases the product may be stabilized, most bug may have been found, and may have a significant part of its product life-time ahead of it.

Is it so difficult (technically)? Expensive?

In many (most??, all??) microcontrollers that I have used over the past years, there where sometimes some silicon level bugs, and the manufacturers provide the engineers with the errata sheets, describing what unexpected behaviour they may face.

Why don't they ever fix these "bugs"? Since the product is still produced, and in most cases solving the problem won't affect the previous implementations, why they do not just revise it? In many cases the product may be stabilized, most bugs may have been found, and may have a significant part of its product life-time ahead of it.

Is it so difficult (technically)? Expensive?

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Silicon bugs, errata sheets

In many (most??, all??) microcontrollers that I have used over the past years, there where sometimes some silicon level bugs, and the manufacturers provide the engineers with the errata sheets, describing what unexpected behaviour they may face.

My question: Why they never fix these "bugs"? Since the product is still produced, and in most cases solving the problem won't affect the previous implementations, why they do not just revise it? In many cases the product may be stabilized, most bug may have been found, and may have a significant part of its product life-time ahead of it.

Is it so difficult (technically)? Expensive?