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Grounded vs ungrounded plugs What are design considerations for grounding an enclosed AC-to-DC concerver wartsconverter?

Here I'm talking about a device that takes 100-240V AC in, and outputs 10-20V DC out. In terms of grounding, I'm referring to the grounding offered by a standard wall plugoutlet (e.g., for a NEMA-5-15R receptacle). ManyIn this space, many devices have a grounded (three prong) cable and many don't.

I'm particularly interested in say laptop power warts (AC-to-DC converters, which are generally always external to the device). The older laptops I had used two-prong ungrounded plugs. The two most recent laptops, however (one Mac, one Dell) have both used grounded plugs. This is really annoying when traveling as many adapters and even outlets don't support the ground plug.

Adding to the confusion, it seems that the same transformer, for the same model laptop, comes with a two prong plug in other countries: my dellDell has a detachable power cord, and I've an otherwise identical brick for the same laptop sold in another country with a different cord that omits the grounding plug.

In all cases, the AD-DC bricks are fully plastic with no exposed metal parts.

ForWhen designing such a device, what reasonare the considerations that would cause a fully enclosed plastic line lump for something like a laptop have a grounding prong?

Grounded vs ungrounded plugs for AC-to-DC concerver warts?

Here I'm talking about a standard wall plug (e.g., for a NEMA-5-15R receptacle). Many devices have a grounded (three prong) cable and many don't.

I'm particularly interested in say laptop power warts (AC-to-DC converters, which are generally always external to the device). The older laptops I had used two-prong ungrounded plugs. The two most recent laptops, however (one Mac, one Dell) have both used grounded plugs. This is really annoying when traveling as many adapters and even outlets don't support the ground plug.

Adding to the confusion, it seems that the same transformer, for the same model laptop, comes with a two prong plug in other countries: my dell has a detachable power cord, and I've an otherwise identical brick for the same laptop sold in another country with a different cord that omits the grounding plug.

In all cases, the AD-DC bricks are fully plastic with no exposed metal parts.

For what reason would a fully enclosed plastic line lump for something like a laptop have a grounding prong?

What are design considerations for grounding an enclosed AC-to-DC converter?

Here I'm talking about a device that takes 100-240V AC in, and outputs 10-20V DC out. In terms of grounding, I'm referring to the grounding offered by a standard outlet (e.g., a NEMA-5-15R receptacle). In this space, many devices have a grounded (three prong) cable and many don't.

I'm particularly interested in say laptop power warts (AC-to-DC converters, which are generally always external to the device). The older laptops I had used two-prong ungrounded plugs. The two most recent laptops, however (one Mac, one Dell) have both used grounded plugs. This is really annoying when traveling as many adapters and even outlets don't support the ground plug.

Adding to the confusion, it seems that the same transformer, for the same model laptop, comes with a two prong plug in other countries: my Dell has a detachable power cord, and I've an otherwise identical brick for the same laptop sold in another country with a different cord that omits the grounding plug.

In all cases, the AD-DC bricks are fully plastic with no exposed metal parts.

When designing such a device, what are the considerations that would cause a fully enclosed plastic line lump for something like a laptop have a grounding prong?

    Post Closed as "primarily opinion-based" by Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Daniel Grillo, uint128_t, Voltage Spike, placeholder
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Here I'm talking about a standard wall plug (e.g., for a NEMA-5-15R receptacle). Many devices have a grounded (three prong) cable and many don't.

I'm particularly interested in say laptop power warts (AC-to-DC converters, which are generally always external to the device). The older laptops I had used two-prong ungrounded plugs. The two most recent laptops, however (one Mac, one Dell) have both used grounded plugs. This is really annoying when traveling as many adapters and even outlets don't support the ground plug.

Adding to the confusion, it seems that the same transformer, for the same model laptop, comes with a two prong plug in other countries: my dell has a detachable power cord, and I've an otherwise identical brick for the same laptop sold in another country with a different cord that omits the grounding plug.

In all cases, the AD-DC bricks are fully plastic with no exposed metal parts.

What givesFor what reason would a fully enclosed plastic line lump for something like a laptop have a grounding prong?

Here I'm talking about a standard wall plug (e.g., for a NEMA-5-15R receptacle). Many devices have a grounded (three prong) cable and many don't.

I'm particularly interested in say laptop power warts (AC-to-DC converters, which are generally always external to the device). The older laptops I had used two-prong ungrounded plugs. The two most recent laptops, however (one Mac, one Dell) have both used grounded plugs. This is really annoying when traveling as many adapters and even outlets don't support the ground plug.

Adding to the confusion, it seems that the same transformer, for the same model laptop, comes with a two prong plug in other countries: my dell has a detachable power cord, and I've an otherwise identical brick for the same laptop sold in another country with a different cord that omits the grounding plug.

In all cases, the AD-DC bricks are fully plastic with no exposed metal parts.

What gives?

Here I'm talking about a standard wall plug (e.g., for a NEMA-5-15R receptacle). Many devices have a grounded (three prong) cable and many don't.

I'm particularly interested in say laptop power warts (AC-to-DC converters, which are generally always external to the device). The older laptops I had used two-prong ungrounded plugs. The two most recent laptops, however (one Mac, one Dell) have both used grounded plugs. This is really annoying when traveling as many adapters and even outlets don't support the ground plug.

Adding to the confusion, it seems that the same transformer, for the same model laptop, comes with a two prong plug in other countries: my dell has a detachable power cord, and I've an otherwise identical brick for the same laptop sold in another country with a different cord that omits the grounding plug.

In all cases, the AD-DC bricks are fully plastic with no exposed metal parts.

For what reason would a fully enclosed plastic line lump for something like a laptop have a grounding prong?

1
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Grounded vs ungrounded plugs for AC-to-DC concerver warts?

Here I'm talking about a standard wall plug (e.g., for a NEMA-5-15R receptacle). Many devices have a grounded (three prong) cable and many don't.

I'm particularly interested in say laptop power warts (AC-to-DC converters, which are generally always external to the device). The older laptops I had used two-prong ungrounded plugs. The two most recent laptops, however (one Mac, one Dell) have both used grounded plugs. This is really annoying when traveling as many adapters and even outlets don't support the ground plug.

Adding to the confusion, it seems that the same transformer, for the same model laptop, comes with a two prong plug in other countries: my dell has a detachable power cord, and I've an otherwise identical brick for the same laptop sold in another country with a different cord that omits the grounding plug.

In all cases, the AD-DC bricks are fully plastic with no exposed metal parts.

What gives?