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  1. Depends. That's an average or max. that shouldn't be exceeded. What device are we talking about? Because, if this is a power supply (for example), it can go from few Watts to 660W, yes. But also can go a bit higher too, if we put something such as motor on it or so.

  2. Internal resistance (as you call it) is called impedance. But that's just as long as it is a single device, not a power supply, which just converts (AC-AC, AC-DC, DC-AC or DC-DC voltage). In this case, it's impedance is much higher.

  3. Yes, about. During the time of work it probably falls down (at least a bit, but theoretically...yes).


The factor P (power) is actually just a energetics thing. Electronics doesn't care about it (unless seing for example what resistor to use, 1/4, 1/2, 1W), because we ALWAYS use determined voltage and determined current. Yes, they together combine power, but it's just not that simple. More voltage equals less current, why would wanted to take more current? It's the same effect. If you need to boil a jar of water, you can put it on stove, who is pre-heated on 100°C for 1 minute or to a preheated stove on 200°C for 30 seconds. The effect is the same, time is different. P=U*I is simmiliar.

  1. Depends. That's an average or max. that shouldn't be exceeded. What device are we talking about? Because, if this is a power supply (for example), it can go from few Watts to 660W, yes. But also can go a bit higher too, if we put something such as motor on it or so.

  2. Internal resistance (as you call it) is called impedance. But that's just as long as it is a single device, not a power supply, which just converts (AC-AC, AC-DC, DC-AC or DC-DC voltage). In this case, it's impedance is much higher.

  3. Yes, about. During the time of work it probably falls down (at least a bit, but theoretically...yes).

  1. Depends. That's an average or max. that shouldn't be exceeded. What device are we talking about? Because, if this is a power supply (for example), it can go from few Watts to 660W, yes. But also can go a bit higher too, if we put something such as motor on it or so.

  2. Internal resistance (as you call it) is called impedance. But that's just as long as it is a single device, not a power supply, which just converts (AC-AC, AC-DC, DC-AC or DC-DC voltage). In this case, it's impedance is much higher.

  3. Yes, about. During the time of work it probably falls down (at least a bit, but theoretically...yes).


The factor P (power) is actually just a energetics thing. Electronics doesn't care about it (unless seing for example what resistor to use, 1/4, 1/2, 1W), because we ALWAYS use determined voltage and determined current. Yes, they together combine power, but it's just not that simple. More voltage equals less current, why would wanted to take more current? It's the same effect. If you need to boil a jar of water, you can put it on stove, who is pre-heated on 100°C for 1 minute or to a preheated stove on 200°C for 30 seconds. The effect is the same, time is different. P=U*I is simmiliar.

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  1. Depends. That's an average or max. that shouldn't be exceeded. What device are we talking about? Because, if this is a power supply (for example), it can go from few Watts to 660W, yes. But also can go a bit higher too, if we put something such as motor on it or so.

  2. Internal resistance (as you call it) is called impedance. But that's just as long as it is a single device, not a power supply, which just converts (AC-AC, AC-DC, DC-AC or DC-DC voltage). In this case, it's impedance is much higher.

  3. Yes, about. During the time of work it probably falls down (at least a bit, but theoretically...yes).