2 Two units that measured the same thing were equated but not equal (kwh and kJ), and improved formatting.
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It's not 75 A/h, it's 75 Ah. That means you can draw at 75 amperes consumed for an hour, then the battery would be drained - theoretically - this represents the amount of charge in a battery. If you multiply that with the (battery) voltage, the resulting value gives you an energy measured in Joules, the SI (IS) unit for energy. 1 kJ = 1kWh, kJJ and kWhWh are actually the same thing, just written in a different wayboth units of energy. $$1kW h = \bigg(\frac{1kJ}{1s}\bigg)*3600s = 3600 kJ$$

For a brief reminder: W (or E) = U x I x t \$P = IV\$, where E\$P\$ is energypower, U\$V\$ is voltage, I\$I\$ is current intensity. and \$E=Pt=IVt\$ where \$E\$ is the energy and t\$t\$ is time.

It's not 75 A/h, it's 75 Ah. That means 75 amperes consumed for an hour. If you multiply that with the (battery) voltage, the resulting value gives you an energy measured in Joules, the SI (IS) unit for energy. 1 kJ = 1kWh, kJ and kWh are actually the same thing, just written in a different way.

For a brief reminder: W (or E) = U x I x t, where E is energy, U is voltage, I is current intensity and t is time.

It's not 75 A/h, it's 75 Ah. That means you can draw at 75 amperes for an hour, then the battery would be drained - theoretically - this represents the amount of charge in a battery. If you multiply that with the (battery) voltage, the resulting value gives you an energy measured in Joules, the SI (IS) unit for energy. J and Wh are both units of energy. $$1kW h = \bigg(\frac{1kJ}{1s}\bigg)*3600s = 3600 kJ$$

For a brief reminder: \$P = IV\$, where \$P\$ is power, \$V\$ is voltage, \$I\$ is current intensity. and \$E=Pt=IVt\$ where \$E\$ is the energy and \$t\$ is time.

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source | link

It's not 75 A/h, it's 75 Ah. That means 75 amperes consumed for an hour. If you multiply that with the (battery) voltage, the resulting value gives you an energy measured in Joules, the SI (IS) unit for energy. 1 kJ = 1kWh, kJ and kWh are actually the same thing, just written in a different way.

For a brief reminder: W (or E) = U x I x t, where E is energy, U is voltage, I is current intensity and t is time.