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I'm working on an existing toy product and the chip has been discontinued. We still want to produce more of this product. You press a combination of buttons and it talks to you.

What would be a more cost effective approach?

  • Reverse engineer a chip (a possiblity based on this post: http://electronics.stackexchange.com/q/13472/1288Is it possible to reverse engineer a chip design? ) and retrieve the program off of it (is this possible?). Make a new chip based on what we find.
  • Start from scratch and see if there are any chips that are compatible (pin assignments, features, package or die) with our existing chip. This way we can still keep the existing PCB design).
  • Start from scratch and use a totally different chip, which would mean PCB redesign, chip programming, etc.

Can anyone give me an order of magnitude comparison between these options?

More Details We're talking about:

  • thousands maybe tens of thousands units a year
  • 25 x 10 second audio tracks (mono)

I'm working on an existing toy product and the chip has been discontinued. We still want to produce more of this product. You press a combination of buttons and it talks to you.

What would be a more cost effective approach?

  • Reverse engineer a chip (a possiblity based on this post: http://electronics.stackexchange.com/q/13472/1288 ) and retrieve the program off of it (is this possible?). Make a new chip based on what we find.
  • Start from scratch and see if there are any chips that are compatible (pin assignments, features, package or die) with our existing chip. This way we can still keep the existing PCB design).
  • Start from scratch and use a totally different chip, which would mean PCB redesign, chip programming, etc.

Can anyone give me an order of magnitude comparison between these options?

More Details We're talking about:

  • thousands maybe tens of thousands units a year
  • 25 x 10 second audio tracks (mono)

I'm working on an existing toy product and the chip has been discontinued. We still want to produce more of this product. You press a combination of buttons and it talks to you.

What would be a more cost effective approach?

  • Reverse engineer a chip (a possiblity based on this post: Is it possible to reverse engineer a chip design? ) and retrieve the program off of it (is this possible?). Make a new chip based on what we find.
  • Start from scratch and see if there are any chips that are compatible (pin assignments, features, package or die) with our existing chip. This way we can still keep the existing PCB design).
  • Start from scratch and use a totally different chip, which would mean PCB redesign, chip programming, etc.

Can anyone give me an order of magnitude comparison between these options?

More Details We're talking about:

  • thousands maybe tens of thousands units a year
  • 25 x 10 second audio tracks (mono)
2 added more info
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I'm working on an existing toy product and the chip has been discontinued. We still want to produce more of this product. You press a combination of buttons and it talks to you.

What would be a more cost effective approach?

  • Reverse engineer a chip (a possiblity based on this post: http://electronics.stackexchange.com/q/13472/1288 ) and retrieve the program off of it (is this possible?). Make a new chip based on what we find.
  • Start from scratch and see if there are any chips that are compatible (pin assignments, features, package or die) with our existing chip. This way we can still keep the existing PCB design).
  • Start from scratch and use a totally different chip, which would mean PCB redesign, chip programming, etc.

Can anyone give me an order of magnitude comparison between these options?

More Details We're talking about:

  • thousands maybe tens of thousands units a year
  • 25 x 10 second audio tracks (mono)

I'm working on an existing toy product and the chip has been discontinued. We still want to produce more of this product. You press a combination of buttons and it talks to you.

What would be a more cost effective approach?

  • Reverse engineer a chip (a possiblity based on this post: http://electronics.stackexchange.com/q/13472/1288 ) and retrieve the program off of it (is this possible?). Make a new chip based on what we find.
  • Start from scratch and see if there are any chips that are compatible (pin assignments, features, package or die) with our existing chip. This way we can still keep the existing PCB design).
  • Start from scratch and use a totally different chip, which would mean PCB redesign, chip programming, etc.

Can anyone give me an order of magnitude comparison between these options?

I'm working on an existing toy product and the chip has been discontinued. We still want to produce more of this product. You press a combination of buttons and it talks to you.

What would be a more cost effective approach?

  • Reverse engineer a chip (a possiblity based on this post: http://electronics.stackexchange.com/q/13472/1288 ) and retrieve the program off of it (is this possible?). Make a new chip based on what we find.
  • Start from scratch and see if there are any chips that are compatible (pin assignments, features, package or die) with our existing chip. This way we can still keep the existing PCB design).
  • Start from scratch and use a totally different chip, which would mean PCB redesign, chip programming, etc.

Can anyone give me an order of magnitude comparison between these options?

More Details We're talking about:

  • thousands maybe tens of thousands units a year
  • 25 x 10 second audio tracks (mono)
    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackElectronix/status/169931021150720000
1
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Reverse engineer a chip or go with a new one and start from scratch?

I'm working on an existing toy product and the chip has been discontinued. We still want to produce more of this product. You press a combination of buttons and it talks to you.

What would be a more cost effective approach?

  • Reverse engineer a chip (a possiblity based on this post: http://electronics.stackexchange.com/q/13472/1288 ) and retrieve the program off of it (is this possible?). Make a new chip based on what we find.
  • Start from scratch and see if there are any chips that are compatible (pin assignments, features, package or die) with our existing chip. This way we can still keep the existing PCB design).
  • Start from scratch and use a totally different chip, which would mean PCB redesign, chip programming, etc.

Can anyone give me an order of magnitude comparison between these options?