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In many Power over Ethernet (POE) setups the transmission voltage is 48V or slightly more. While higher voltage has obvious efficiency advantages, how safe it is? Is there any risk of electrocution when accidentally exposed, in particular to children? Such wirings lack the protection that is used for 120/230V, and frankly the difference between 48V and 120V doesn't seem to be that significant.

In many POE setups the transmission voltage is 48V or slightly more. While higher voltage has obvious efficiency advantages, how safe it is? Is there any risk of electrocution when accidentally exposed, in particular to children? Such wirings lack the protection that is used for 120/230V, and frankly the difference between 48V and 120V doesn't seem to be that significant.

In many Power over Ethernet (POE) setups the transmission voltage is 48V or slightly more. While higher voltage has obvious efficiency advantages, how safe it is? Is there any risk of electrocution when accidentally exposed, in particular to children? Such wirings lack the protection that is used for 120/230V, and frankly the difference between 48V and 120V doesn't seem to be that significant.

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In many POEPOE setups the transmission voltage is 48V or slightly more. While higher voltage has obvious efficiency advantages, how safe it is? Is there any risk of electrocution when accidentally exposed, in particular to children? Such wirings lack the protection that is used for 120/230V, and frankly the difference between 48V and 120V doesn't seem to be that significant.

In many POE setups the transmission voltage is 48V or slightly more. While higher voltage has obvious efficiency advantages, how safe it is? Is there any risk of electrocution when accidentally exposed, in particular to children? Such wirings lack the protection that is used for 120/230V, and frankly the difference between 48V and 120V doesn't seem to be that significant.

In many POE setups the transmission voltage is 48V or slightly more. While higher voltage has obvious efficiency advantages, how safe it is? Is there any risk of electrocution when accidentally exposed, in particular to children? Such wirings lack the protection that is used for 120/230V, and frankly the difference between 48V and 120V doesn't seem to be that significant.

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How safe is 48V DC?

In many POE setups the transmission voltage is 48V or slightly more. While higher voltage has obvious efficiency advantages, how safe it is? Is there any risk of electrocution when accidentally exposed, in particular to children? Such wirings lack the protection that is used for 120/230V, and frankly the difference between 48V and 120V doesn't seem to be that significant.