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A couple of other answers mention 48V DC being a "safe" voltage, however I would argue that the environmental conditions (grounding, skin conductance etc) are far more important factors than just voltage.

The following is anecdotal admittedly, but I have experienced a very nasty DC shock working on a 48V DC gyro on a ship after coming inside with wet salty hands.

See also the following stackexchange answer that claims even 24V can be dangerous under certain conditions. http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/19103/how-much-voltage-is-dangerousHow much voltage/current is "dangerous"?

A couple of other answers mention 48V DC being a "safe" voltage, however I would argue that the environmental conditions (grounding, skin conductance etc) are far more important factors than just voltage.

The following is anecdotal admittedly, but I have experienced a very nasty DC shock working on a 48V DC gyro on a ship after coming inside with wet salty hands.

See also the following stackexchange answer that claims even 24V can be dangerous under certain conditions. http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/19103/how-much-voltage-is-dangerous

A couple of other answers mention 48V DC being a "safe" voltage, however I would argue that the environmental conditions (grounding, skin conductance etc) are far more important factors than just voltage.

The following is anecdotal admittedly, but I have experienced a very nasty DC shock working on a 48V DC gyro on a ship after coming inside with wet salty hands.

See also the following stackexchange answer that claims even 24V can be dangerous under certain conditions. How much voltage/current is "dangerous"?

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A couple of other answers mention 48V DC being a "safe" voltage, however I would argue that the environmental conditions (grounding, skin conductance etc) are far more important factors than just voltage.

The following is anecdotal admittedly, but I have experienced a very nasty DC shock working on a 48V DC gyro on a ship after coming inside with wet salty hands.

See also the following stackexchange answer that claims even 24V can be dangerous under certain conditions. http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/19103/how-much-voltage-is-dangerous