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Even as far back as the early 1900s, telegrams transmitted wirelessly could reach hundreds of miles. For instance, the Titanic communicated with Canada, 400 miles away, with relatively low-powered equipment. Given that telegraphs are very simple, how could these pulses travelhave traveled so far?

And would these pulses still travel that far today with the same equipment?

And doesn't this mean that there couldn't have been very many people using the systems, since operators within hundreds of miles would all be jamming the airwaves? It seems this would produce a lot of cross-talk. Or were there multiple frequencies available for wireless telegraphy?

Even as far back as the early 1900s, telegrams transmitted wirelessly could reach hundreds of miles. For instance, the Titanic communicated with Canada, 400 miles away, with relatively low-powered equipment. Given that telegraphs are very simple, how could these pulses travel so far?

And would these pulses still travel that far today with the same equipment?

And doesn't this mean that there couldn't have been very many people using the systems, since operators within hundreds of miles would all be jamming the airwaves? It seems this would produce a lot of cross-talk. Or were there multiple frequencies available for wireless telegraphy?

Even as far back as the early 1900s, telegrams transmitted wirelessly could reach hundreds of miles. For instance, the Titanic communicated with Canada, 400 miles away, with relatively low-powered equipment. Given that telegraphs are very simple, how could these pulses have traveled so far?

And would these pulses still travel that far today with the same equipment?

And doesn't this mean that there couldn't have been very many people using the systems, since operators within hundreds of miles would all be jamming the airwaves? It seems this would produce a lot of cross-talk. Or were there multiple frequencies available for wireless telegraphy?

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Even as far back as the early 1900s, telegrams transmitted wirelessly could reach hundreds of miles. For instance, the Titanic communicated with Canada, 400 miles away, with relatively low-powered equipment. Given that telegraphs are very simple, how could these pulses travel so far?

And would these pulses still travel that far today with the same equipment?

And doesn't this mean that there couldn't have been very many people using the systems, since operators within hundreds of miles would all be jamming the airwaves? It seems this would produce a lot of cross-talk. Or were there multiple frequencies available for wireless telegraphy?

Even as far back as the early 1900s, telegrams transmitted wirelessly could reach hundreds of miles. For instance, the Titanic communicated with Canada, 400 miles away, with relatively low-powered equipment. Given that telegraphs are very simple, how could these pulses travel so far?

And would these pulses still travel that far today with the same equipment?

Even as far back as the early 1900s, telegrams transmitted wirelessly could reach hundreds of miles. For instance, the Titanic communicated with Canada, 400 miles away, with relatively low-powered equipment. Given that telegraphs are very simple, how could these pulses travel so far?

And would these pulses still travel that far today with the same equipment?

And doesn't this mean that there couldn't have been very many people using the systems, since operators within hundreds of miles would all be jamming the airwaves? It seems this would produce a lot of cross-talk. Or were there multiple frequencies available for wireless telegraphy?

2 added 79 characters in body
source | link

Even as far back as the early 1900s, telegrams transmitted wirelessly could reach hundreds of miles. For instance, the Titanic communicated with Canada, 400 miles away, with relatively low-powered equipment. Given that telegraphs are very simple, how could these pulses travel so far?

And would these pulses still travel that far today with the same equipment?

Even as far back as the early 1900s, telegrams transmitted wirelessly could reach hundreds of miles. For instance, the Titanic communicated with Canada, 400 miles away, with relatively low-powered equipment. Given that telegraphs are very simple, how could these pulses travel so far?

Even as far back as the early 1900s, telegrams transmitted wirelessly could reach hundreds of miles. For instance, the Titanic communicated with Canada, 400 miles away, with relatively low-powered equipment. Given that telegraphs are very simple, how could these pulses travel so far?

And would these pulses still travel that far today with the same equipment?

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