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Why does VGA needhave so many ground pins but(compared to DVI-I doesn'tfor example)?

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If you look at the pinout for VGA, there are several ground pins:

VGA Pinout

I was curious as to why, and I found this answer. To sum it up, the extra ground pins are so that each pin has its own ground in order to prevent interference in the analog signal.

But here's a DVI-I connector that supports analog signals:

DVI PinoutDVI Pinout

The analog pins are on the right side. The big cross is ground, and the four smaller pins surrounding it are for the red, green, blue, and horizontal sync. What is interesting here is that the ground is shared by all three color channels, unlike VGA where each has its own.

Why are the additional ground pins necessary to prevent signal interference when using VGA but not DVI-I? They're the same pins that send the same data, just with a different physical connector, so it doesn't really make much sense as to why the number of ground connectors are different.

If you look at the pinout for VGA, there are several ground pins:

VGA Pinout

I was curious as to why, and I found this answer. To sum it up, the extra ground pins are so that each pin has its own ground in order to prevent interference in the analog signal.

But here's a DVI-I connector that supports analog signals:

DVI Pinout

The analog pins are on the right side. The big cross is ground, and the four smaller pins surrounding it are for the red, green, blue, and horizontal sync. What is interesting here is that the ground is shared by all three color channels, unlike VGA where each has its own.

Why are the additional ground pins necessary to prevent signal interference when using VGA but not DVI-I? They're the same pins that send the same data, just with a different physical connector, so it doesn't really make much sense as to why the number of ground connectors are different.

If you look at the pinout for VGA, there are several ground pins:

VGA Pinout

I was curious as to why, and I found this answer. To sum it up, the extra ground pins are so that each pin has its own ground in order to prevent interference in the analog signal.

But here's a DVI-I connector that supports analog signals:

DVI Pinout

The analog pins are on the right side. The big cross is ground, and the four smaller pins surrounding it are for the red, green, blue, and horizontal sync. What is interesting here is that the ground is shared by all three color channels, unlike VGA where each has its own.

Why are the additional ground pins necessary to prevent signal interference when using VGA but not DVI-I? They're the same pins that send the same data, just with a different physical connector, so it doesn't really make much sense as to why the number of ground connectors are different.

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If you look at the pinout for VGA, there are several ground pins:

VGA Pinout

I was curious as to why, and I found this answer. To sum it up, the extra ground pins are so that each pin has it'sits own ground in order to prevent interference in the analog signal.

But here's a DVI-I connector that supports analog signals:

DVI Pinout

The analog pins are on the right side. The big cross is ground, and the four smaller pins surrounding it are for the red, green, blue, and horizontal sync. What is interesting here is that the ground is shared by all three color channels, unlike VGA where each has it'sits own.

Why are the additional ground pins necessary to prevent signal interference when using VGA but not DVI-I? They're the same pins that send the same data, just with a different physical connector, so it doesn't really make much sense as to why the number of ground connectors are different.

If you look at the pinout for VGA, there are several ground pins:

VGA Pinout

I was curious as to why, and I found this answer. To sum it up, the extra ground pins are so that each pin has it's own ground in order to prevent interference in the analog signal.

But here's a DVI-I connector that supports analog signals:

DVI Pinout

The analog pins are on the right side. The big cross is ground, and the four smaller pins surrounding it are for the red, green, blue, and horizontal sync. What is interesting here is that the ground is shared by all three color channels, unlike VGA where each has it's own.

Why are the additional ground pins necessary to prevent signal interference when using VGA but not DVI-I? They're the same pins that send the same data, just with a different physical connector, so it doesn't really make much sense as to why the number of ground connectors are different.

If you look at the pinout for VGA, there are several ground pins:

VGA Pinout

I was curious as to why, and I found this answer. To sum it up, the extra ground pins are so that each pin has its own ground in order to prevent interference in the analog signal.

But here's a DVI-I connector that supports analog signals:

DVI Pinout

The analog pins are on the right side. The big cross is ground, and the four smaller pins surrounding it are for the red, green, blue, and horizontal sync. What is interesting here is that the ground is shared by all three color channels, unlike VGA where each has its own.

Why are the additional ground pins necessary to prevent signal interference when using VGA but not DVI-I? They're the same pins that send the same data, just with a different physical connector, so it doesn't really make much sense as to why the number of ground connectors are different.

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