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This is really basic math, although you left out one important parameter, which is the sample size.

Let's say each sample is 16 bits for sake of example. At 1 Hz rate, that means you need 16 bits, or two bytes, for every second of running time. Your running time is 1 month3 months. Do the math:

  (3 months)(30 days/month)(24 hours/day)(3600 s/hour)(2 bytes/s)(2 channels) = 31 MBytes

Yes, it really is that simple.

This is really basic math, although you left out one important parameter, which is the sample size.

Let's say each sample is 16 bits for sake of example. At 1 Hz rate, that means you need 16 bits, or two bytes, for every second of running time. Your running time is 1 month. Do the math:

  (3 months)(30 days/month)(24 hours/day)(3600 s/hour)(2 bytes/s)(2 channels) = 31 MBytes

Yes, it really is that simple.

This is really basic math, although you left out one important parameter, which is the sample size.

Let's say each sample is 16 bits for sake of example. At 1 Hz rate, that means you need 16 bits, or two bytes, for every second of running time. Your running time is 3 months. Do the math:

  (3 months)(30 days/month)(24 hours/day)(3600 s/hour)(2 bytes/s)(2 channels) = 31 MBytes

Yes, it really is that simple.

2 added 10 characters in body
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This is really basic math, although you left out one important parameter, which is the sample size.

Let's say each sample is 16 bits for sake of example. At 1 Hz rate, that means you need 16 bits, or two bytes, for every second of running time. Your running time is 1 month. Do the math:

  (3 months)(30 days/month)(24 hours/day)(3600 s/hour)(2 bytes/s)(2 channels) = 15.631 MBytes

Yes, it really is that simple.

This is really basic math, although you left out one important parameter, which is the sample size.

Let's say each sample is 16 bits for sake of example. At 1 Hz rate, that means you need 16 bits, or two bytes, for every second of running time. Your running time is 1 month. Do the math:

  (3 months)(30 days/month)(24 hours/day)(3600 s/hour)(2 bytes/s) = 15.6 MBytes

Yes, it really is that simple.

This is really basic math, although you left out one important parameter, which is the sample size.

Let's say each sample is 16 bits for sake of example. At 1 Hz rate, that means you need 16 bits, or two bytes, for every second of running time. Your running time is 1 month. Do the math:

  (3 months)(30 days/month)(24 hours/day)(3600 s/hour)(2 bytes/s)(2 channels) = 31 MBytes

Yes, it really is that simple.

1
source | link

This is really basic math, although you left out one important parameter, which is the sample size.

Let's say each sample is 16 bits for sake of example. At 1 Hz rate, that means you need 16 bits, or two bytes, for every second of running time. Your running time is 1 month. Do the math:

  (3 months)(30 days/month)(24 hours/day)(3600 s/hour)(2 bytes/s) = 15.6 MBytes

Yes, it really is that simple.