4 Overall improvements. Removed irrelevant mention and explanation about what SPICE means. Removed obsolete information: LTspice codebase was rewritten long ago and is no longer based on berkeley spice.
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SPICE stands for "Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis" andAnything related to LTSpice LTspice is an analog circuit simulator. It was orginally written at UC Berkeley and published under a permissive license.SPICE simulation, schematic capture and waveform viewer program from Linear Technology adapted the codebasis to their needs. This tag should be used of 

LTspice specificis completely free and has no limitations (simulationno max number of parts, for example, like the free crippled version of other commercial simulators) questions. ThereIt is a more broader tagone of the best simulators around (it is used by Linear Technology for SPICEin-house simulations - it is no toy). The program is lightweight (and simulation~40MB installed) itself, works under Windows and was developed to be run in Linux under WINE. The license is very liberal: you can even use it for general SPICE related questionscommercial purposes without permission from Linear Technology, as long as you are not a competitor in the market of chip manufacturing.

See also:

SPICE stands for "Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis" and is an analog circuit simulator. It was orginally written at UC Berkeley and published under a permissive license. Linear Technology adapted the codebasis to their needs. This tag should be used of LTspice specific (simulation) questions. There is a more broader tag for SPICE (and simulation) itself for general SPICE related questions.

Anything related to LTSpice LTspice is a SPICE simulation, schematic capture and waveform viewer program from Linear Technology. 

LTspice is completely free and has no limitations (no max number of parts, for example, like the free crippled version of other commercial simulators). It is one of the best simulators around (it is used by Linear Technology for in-house simulations - it is no toy). The program is lightweight (~40MB installed), works under Windows and was developed to be run in Linux under WINE. The license is very liberal: you can even use it for commercial purposes without permission from Linear Technology, as long as you are not a competitor in the market of chip manufacturing.

See also:

3 tag usage pointed out
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SPICE stands for "Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis" and is an analog circuit simulator. It was orginally written at UC Berkeley and published under a permissive license. Linear Technology adapted the codebasis to their needs. This tag should be used of LTspice specific (simulation) questions. There is a more broader tag for SPICE (and simulation) itself for general SPICE related questions.

SPICE stands for "Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis" and is an analog circuit simulator. It was orginally written at UC Berkeley and published under a permissive license. Linear Technology adapted the codebasis to their needs.

SPICE stands for "Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis" and is an analog circuit simulator. It was orginally written at UC Berkeley and published under a permissive license. Linear Technology adapted the codebasis to their needs. This tag should be used of LTspice specific (simulation) questions. There is a more broader tag for SPICE (and simulation) itself for general SPICE related questions.

2 added 244 characters in body
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SPICE stands for "Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis" and is an analog circuit simulator. It was orginally written at UC Berkeley and published under a permissive license. Linear Technology adapted the codebasis to their needs.

SPICE stands for "Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis" and is an analog circuit simulator. It was orginally written at UC Berkeley and published under a permissive license. Linear Technology adapted the codebasis to their needs.

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