2 replaced http://electronics.stackexchange.com/ with https://electronics.stackexchange.com/
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This has been covered in a few questions, but not all together. In summary, and ignoring most of the alternating-current-related questions and answers:

Insulation, including gloves and matts, should not be a safety concern, but for electrostatic discharge protection. For safety, poweroff and discharge the circuit before working with it. Fuses, breakers and related components are used for fire protection. A multimeter needs good input protection, though primarily for high-capacity AC faults and high-voltage surges (long spikes), as explored by Dave Jones in this EEVBlog video: [link]. Exhaust fumes and wear goggles while soldering. Don't feed the trolls.

This has been covered in a few questions, but not all together. In summary, and ignoring most of the alternating-current-related questions and answers:

Insulation, including gloves and matts, should not be a safety concern, but for electrostatic discharge protection. For safety, poweroff and discharge the circuit before working with it. Fuses, breakers and related components are used for fire protection. A multimeter needs good input protection, though primarily for high-capacity AC faults and high-voltage surges (long spikes), as explored by Dave Jones in this EEVBlog video: [link]. Exhaust fumes and wear goggles while soldering. Don't feed the trolls.

This has been covered in a few questions, but not all together. In summary, and ignoring most of the alternating-current-related questions and answers:

Insulation, including gloves and matts, should not be a safety concern, but for electrostatic discharge protection. For safety, poweroff and discharge the circuit before working with it. Fuses, breakers and related components are used for fire protection. A multimeter needs good input protection, though primarily for high-capacity AC faults and high-voltage surges (long spikes), as explored by Dave Jones in this EEVBlog video: [link]. Exhaust fumes and wear goggles while soldering. Don't feed the trolls.

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source | link

This has been covered in a few questions, but not all together. In summary, and ignoring most of the alternating-current-related questions and answers:

Insulation, including gloves and matts, should not be a safety concern, but for electrostatic discharge protection. For safety, poweroff and discharge the circuit before working with it. Fuses, breakers and related components are used for fire protection. A multimeter needs good input protection, though primarily for high-capacity AC faults and high-voltage surges (long spikes), as explored by Dave Jones in this EEVBlog video: [link]. Exhaust fumes and wear goggles while soldering. Don't feed the trolls.