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In general, buck and boost converters are designed to regulate the output voltage over changes in line and load.

However, they don't have to be, and some DC-DC converters are designed to provide a fixed ratio conversion, especially buck converters. A DC-DC fixed ratio converter is sometimes called a "bus converter". See here

Some converters have "pass-through" mode, so that in the case of a buck where the input voltage falls below the output set point the output will track the input voltage minus a small drop. The

The converse holds true for boost converters, and in a non-synchronous boost when the input rises above the set-point usually the controller stops switching and the input passes through to the output through the boost diode.

In converters without "pass-through" the out-of-normal-range behavior depends on the individual design and controller used. In any case there's always a low voltage limit where the circuitry can no longer work and a high voltage limit that will damage the components.

In general, buck and boost converters are designed to regulate the output voltage over changes in line and load.

However, they don't have to be, and some DC-DC converters are designed to provide a fixed ratio conversion, especially buck converters. A DC-DC fixed ratio converter is sometimes called a "bus converter".

Some converters have "pass-through" mode, so that in the case of a buck where the input voltage falls below the output set point the output will track the input voltage minus a small drop. The converse holds true for boost converters.

In converters without "pass-through" the out-of-normal-range behavior depends on the individual design and controller used. In any case there's always a low voltage limit where the circuitry can no longer work and a high voltage limit that will damage the components.

In general, buck and boost converters are designed to regulate the output voltage over changes in line and load.

However, they don't have to be, and some DC-DC converters are designed to provide a fixed ratio conversion, especially buck converters. A DC-DC fixed ratio converter is sometimes called a "bus converter". See here

Some converters have "pass-through" mode, so that in the case of a buck where the input voltage falls below the output set point the output will track the input voltage minus a small drop.

The converse holds true for boost converters, and in a non-synchronous boost when the input rises above the set-point usually the controller stops switching and the input passes through to the output through the boost diode.

In converters without "pass-through" the out-of-normal-range behavior depends on the individual design and controller used. In any case there's always a low voltage limit where the circuitry can no longer work and a high voltage limit that will damage the components.

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In general, buck and boost converters are designed to regulate the output voltage over changes in line and load.

However, they don't have to be, and some DC-DC converters are designed to provide a fixed ratio conversion, especially buck converters. A DC-DC fixed ratio converter is sometimes called a "bus converter".

Some converters have "pass-through" mode, so that in the case of a buck where the input voltage falls below the output set point the output will track the input voltage minus a small drop. The converse holds true for boost converters.

In converters without "pass-through" the out-of-normal-range behavior depends on the individual design and controller used. In any case there's always a low voltage limit where the circuitry can no longer work and a high voltage limit that will damage the components.