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6 Call out the question of the description of the linked PDF.
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I'd like to initiate a spark plug arc with an ignition coil and then power the resulting (highly conductive) plasma with an ultracapacitor (low voltage, say 12V to 24V, and high current) without damaging the ultracapacitor during the initiation.

It would do something similar to this circuit: enter image description here

But instead of relying on a 20KV power supply, it would be preferable to use a low voltage supply

I'm trying to avoid any arc-circuit resistance beyond the arc itself and the negligible ESR of the ultracapacitor.

SinceI find the arc power source is aaforelinked PDF description of the above pictured circuit somewhat confusing. It says the 20KV capacitor discharges through the inductor upon the Arc Strike Signal closing the switch -- but doesn't say anything about the timing of circuit in relation to the switch re-opening the circuit (which is presumably what causes the ignition spark). Moreover, why would it seems a reasonablenot be sufficient to dispense with the capacitor in this role and dispense with the timing problem by increasing the induction of the coil, lowering the Igniting Power Supply voltage and then closing and opening the switch at "leisure" to produce the magnetic field and then the spark as with an ordinary ignition coil? It's almost as if the description is off conjecture-- and that it can replace the capacitor inis there only as a "snubber capacitor", to absorb the back EMF away from the Arc Strike Pulse Unit so longPower Supply.

Thinking along these lines:

Might the ultracapacitor serve as its own snubber capacitor if the backemf polarity of the inductorback EMF discharges the inductor-side plates of the capacitor. Moreoverplate? Also, if the inductor has reasonably high inductance, it seems the Arc Strike Pulse Unit's power supply can be the same (kind of) supply (say lead acid battery) that charges the capacitorultracapacitor. Something Pehaps, something like this (I was unable to find a spark gap in the circuit lab parts so I used a voltage controlled switch for the arc):

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

You close SW1 to charge the capacitor. Open it. Then close SW2 to establish the inductor field. Open it and the arc is initiated while the inductor's back EMF draws a small amount of charge from the inductor-side plate. The sacrificial fuse then breaks the arc plasma's circuit after it is delivered a short, high current, low voltage pulse.

You can play with the switches and simulate the behavior at this falstad URL.

Is this conjectured circuit reasonable?

I'd like to initiate a spark plug arc with an ignition coil and then power the resulting (highly conductive) plasma with an ultracapacitor (low voltage, say 12V to 24V, and high current) without damaging the ultracapacitor during the initiation.

It would do something similar to this circuit: enter image description here

But instead of relying on a 20KV power supply, it would be preferable to use a low voltage supply

I'm trying to avoid any arc-circuit resistance beyond the arc itself and the negligible ESR of the ultracapacitor.

Since the arc power source is a capacitor, it seems a reasonable conjecture that it can replace the capacitor in the Arc Strike Pulse Unit so long as the backemf polarity of the inductor discharges the inductor-side plates of the capacitor. Moreover, if the inductor has reasonably high inductance, it seems the Arc Strike Pulse Unit's power supply can be the same (kind of) supply (say lead acid battery) that charges the capacitor. Something like this (I was unable to find a spark gap in the circuit lab parts so I used a voltage controlled switch for the arc):

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

You close SW1 to charge the capacitor. Open it. Then close SW2 to establish the inductor field. Open it and the arc is initiated while the inductor's back EMF draws a small amount of charge from the inductor-side plate. The sacrificial fuse then breaks the arc plasma's circuit after it is delivered a short, high current, low voltage pulse.

You can play with the switches and simulate the behavior at this falstad URL.

Is this conjectured circuit reasonable?

I'd like to initiate a spark plug arc with an ignition coil and then power the resulting (highly conductive) plasma with an ultracapacitor (low voltage, say 12V to 24V, and high current) without damaging the ultracapacitor during the initiation.

It would do something similar to this circuit: enter image description here

But instead of relying on a 20KV power supply, it would be preferable to use a low voltage supply

I'm trying to avoid any arc-circuit resistance beyond the arc itself and the negligible ESR of the ultracapacitor.

I find the aforelinked PDF description of the above pictured circuit somewhat confusing. It says the 20KV capacitor discharges through the inductor upon the Arc Strike Signal closing the switch -- but doesn't say anything about the timing of circuit in relation to the switch re-opening the circuit (which is presumably what causes the ignition spark). Moreover, why would it not be sufficient to dispense with the capacitor in this role and dispense with the timing problem by increasing the induction of the coil, lowering the Igniting Power Supply voltage and then closing and opening the switch at "leisure" to produce the magnetic field and then the spark as with an ordinary ignition coil? It's almost as if the description is off -- and that the capacitor is there only as a "snubber capacitor", to absorb the back EMF away from the Arc Power Supply.

Thinking along these lines:

Might the ultracapacitor serve as its own snubber capacitor if the polarity of the back EMF discharges the inductor-side plate? Also, if the inductor has reasonably high inductance, it seems the Arc Strike Pulse Unit's power supply can be the same (kind of) supply (say lead acid battery) that charges the ultracapacitor. Pehaps, something like this (I was unable to find a spark gap in the circuit lab parts so I used a voltage controlled switch for the arc):

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

You close SW1 to charge the capacitor. Open it. Then close SW2 to establish the inductor field. Open it and the arc is initiated while the inductor's back EMF draws a small amount of charge from the inductor-side plate. The sacrificial fuse then breaks the arc plasma's circuit after it is delivered a short, high current, low voltage pulse.

You can play with the switches and simulate the behavior at this falstad URL.

Is this conjectured circuit reasonable?

5 Add a falstad circuit interactive simulation.
source | link

I'd like to initiate a spark plug arc with an ignition coil and then power the resulting (highly conductive) plasma with an ultracapacitor (low voltage, say 12V to 24V, and high current) without damaging the ultracapacitor during the initiation.

It would do something similar to this circuit: enter image description here

But instead of relying on a 20KV power supply, it would be preferable to use a low voltage supply

I'm trying to avoid any arc-circuit resistance beyond the arc itself and the negligible ESR of the ultracapacitor.

Since the arc power source is a capacitor, it seems a reasonable conjecture that it can replace the capacitor in the Arc Strike Pulse Unit so long as the backemf polarity of the inductor discharges the inductor-side plates of the capacitor. Moreover, if the inductor has reasonably high inductance, it seems the Arc Strike Pulse Unit's power supply can be the same (kind of) supply (say lead acid battery) that charges the capacitor. Something like this (I was unable to find a spark gap in the circuit lab parts so I used a voltage controlled switch for the arc):

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

You close SW1 to charge the capacitor. Open it. Then close SW2 to establish the inductor field. Open it and the arc is initiated while the inductor's back EMF draws a small amount of charge from the inductor-side plate. The sacrificial fuse then breaks the arc plasma's circuit after it is delivered a short, high current, low voltage pulse.

You can play with the switches and simulate the behavior at this falstad URL.

Is this conjectured circuit reasonable?

I'd like to initiate a spark plug arc with an ignition coil and then power the resulting (highly conductive) plasma with an ultracapacitor (low voltage, say 12V to 24V, and high current) without damaging the ultracapacitor during the initiation.

It would do something similar to this circuit: enter image description here

But instead of relying on a 20KV power supply, it would be preferable to use a low voltage supply

I'm trying to avoid any arc-circuit resistance beyond the arc itself and the negligible ESR of the ultracapacitor.

Since the arc power source is a capacitor, it seems a reasonable conjecture that it can replace the capacitor in the Arc Strike Pulse Unit so long as the backemf polarity of the inductor discharges the inductor-side plates of the capacitor. Moreover, if the inductor has reasonably high inductance, it seems the Arc Strike Pulse Unit's power supply can be the same (kind of) supply (say lead acid battery) that charges the capacitor. Something like this (I was unable to find a spark gap in the circuit lab parts so I used a voltage controlled switch for the arc):

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

You close SW1 to charge the capacitor. Open it. Then close SW2 to establish the inductor field. Open it and the arc is initiated while the inductor's back EMF draws a small amount of charge from the inductor-side plate. The sacrificial fuse then breaks the arc plasma's circuit after it is delivered a short, high current, low voltage pulse.

Is this conjectured circuit reasonable?

I'd like to initiate a spark plug arc with an ignition coil and then power the resulting (highly conductive) plasma with an ultracapacitor (low voltage, say 12V to 24V, and high current) without damaging the ultracapacitor during the initiation.

It would do something similar to this circuit: enter image description here

But instead of relying on a 20KV power supply, it would be preferable to use a low voltage supply

I'm trying to avoid any arc-circuit resistance beyond the arc itself and the negligible ESR of the ultracapacitor.

Since the arc power source is a capacitor, it seems a reasonable conjecture that it can replace the capacitor in the Arc Strike Pulse Unit so long as the backemf polarity of the inductor discharges the inductor-side plates of the capacitor. Moreover, if the inductor has reasonably high inductance, it seems the Arc Strike Pulse Unit's power supply can be the same (kind of) supply (say lead acid battery) that charges the capacitor. Something like this (I was unable to find a spark gap in the circuit lab parts so I used a voltage controlled switch for the arc):

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

You close SW1 to charge the capacitor. Open it. Then close SW2 to establish the inductor field. Open it and the arc is initiated while the inductor's back EMF draws a small amount of charge from the inductor-side plate. The sacrificial fuse then breaks the arc plasma's circuit after it is delivered a short, high current, low voltage pulse.

You can play with the switches and simulate the behavior at this falstad URL.

Is this conjectured circuit reasonable?

4 edited body
source | link

I'd like to initiate a spark plug arc with an ignition coil and then power the resulting (highly conductive) plasma with an ultracapacitor (low voltage, say 12V to 24V, and high current) without damaging the ultracapacitor during the initiation.

It would do something similar to this circuit: enter image description here

But instead of relying on a 20KV power supply, it would be preferable to use a low voltage supply

I'm trying to avoid any arc-circuit resistance beyond the arc itself and the negligible ESR of the ultracapacitor.

Since the arc power source is a capacitor, it seems a reasonable conjecture that it can replace the capacitor in the Arc Strike Pulse Unit so long as the backemf polarity of the inductor discharges the inductor-side plates of the capacitor. Moreover, if the inductor has reasonably high inductance, it seems the Arc Strike Pulse Unit's power supply can be the same (kind of) supply (say lead acid battery) that charges the capacitor. Something like this (I was unable to find a spark gap in the circuit lab parts so I used a voltage controlled switch for the arc):

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

You close SW1 to charge the capacitor. Open it. Then close SW2 to establish the inductor field. Open it and the arc is initiated while the inductor's back EMF draws a small amount of charge from the inductor-side plate. The sacrificial fuse then breaks the arc plasma's circuit after it is delivered a short, high current, low voltage pulse.

Is this conjectured cirtuitcircuit reasonable?

I'd like to initiate a spark plug arc with an ignition coil and then power the resulting (highly conductive) plasma with an ultracapacitor (low voltage, say 12V to 24V, and high current) without damaging the ultracapacitor during the initiation.

It would do something similar to this circuit: enter image description here

But instead of relying on a 20KV power supply, it would be preferable to use a low voltage supply

I'm trying to avoid any arc-circuit resistance beyond the arc itself and the negligible ESR of the ultracapacitor.

Since the arc power source is a capacitor, it seems a reasonable conjecture that it can replace the capacitor in the Arc Strike Pulse Unit so long as the backemf polarity of the inductor discharges the inductor-side plates of the capacitor. Moreover, if the inductor has reasonably high inductance, it seems the Arc Strike Pulse Unit's power supply can be the same (kind of) supply (say lead acid battery) that charges the capacitor. Something like this (I was unable to find a spark gap in the circuit lab parts so I used a voltage controlled switch for the arc):

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

You close SW1 to charge the capacitor. Open it. Then close SW2 to establish the inductor field. Open it and the arc is initiated while the inductor's back EMF draws a small amount of charge from the inductor-side plate. The sacrificial fuse then breaks the arc plasma's circuit after it is delivered a short, high current, low voltage pulse.

Is this conjectured cirtuit reasonable?

I'd like to initiate a spark plug arc with an ignition coil and then power the resulting (highly conductive) plasma with an ultracapacitor (low voltage, say 12V to 24V, and high current) without damaging the ultracapacitor during the initiation.

It would do something similar to this circuit: enter image description here

But instead of relying on a 20KV power supply, it would be preferable to use a low voltage supply

I'm trying to avoid any arc-circuit resistance beyond the arc itself and the negligible ESR of the ultracapacitor.

Since the arc power source is a capacitor, it seems a reasonable conjecture that it can replace the capacitor in the Arc Strike Pulse Unit so long as the backemf polarity of the inductor discharges the inductor-side plates of the capacitor. Moreover, if the inductor has reasonably high inductance, it seems the Arc Strike Pulse Unit's power supply can be the same (kind of) supply (say lead acid battery) that charges the capacitor. Something like this (I was unable to find a spark gap in the circuit lab parts so I used a voltage controlled switch for the arc):

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

You close SW1 to charge the capacitor. Open it. Then close SW2 to establish the inductor field. Open it and the arc is initiated while the inductor's back EMF draws a small amount of charge from the inductor-side plate. The sacrificial fuse then breaks the arc plasma's circuit after it is delivered a short, high current, low voltage pulse.

Is this conjectured circuit reasonable?

3 State question regarding conjecture.
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2 Incorporate a plausible circuit diagram for critique.
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1
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