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The FastCharge 2.0 standard has these charging specifications in the exact same charger (a VoltCraft car charger):

  • 5 V up to 2.0 A (10 W max.)
  • 7 V up to 2.5 A (17.5 W max.)
  • 9 V up to 2.0 A (18 W max.)
  • 12 V up to 1.5 A (18 W max.)

So the 7 V, 9 V and 12 V modes deliver pretty much the same power. The phone automatically adjusts to the supplied voltage. Some smartphones such as UlePhone Armor2 support 9V2A Some smartphones such as UlePhone Armor2 support 9V2A and 12V×1.5A.and 12V×1.5A.

For cables with higher resistance (i.e. long cables), the phone can 'request an increase of power' from the charger to compensate for the increased cable losses. So it's, "I want 1.66A, please increase the voltage until 1.66A is reached, I will deal with resistance control".

My question is:

When is utilizing 7 V × 2.5 A, when 9 V × 2 A and when 12 V × 1.5 A more suitable? The latter two deliver the same Wattage.

The FastCharge 2.0 standard has these charging specifications in the exact same charger (a VoltCraft car charger):

  • 5 V up to 2.0 A (10 W max.)
  • 7 V up to 2.5 A (17.5 W max.)
  • 9 V up to 2.0 A (18 W max.)
  • 12 V up to 1.5 A (18 W max.)

So the 7 V, 9 V and 12 V modes deliver pretty much the same power. The phone automatically adjusts to the supplied voltage. Some smartphones such as UlePhone Armor2 support 9V2A and 12V×1.5A.

For cables with higher resistance (i.e. long cables), the phone can 'request an increase of power' from the charger to compensate for the increased cable losses. So it's, "I want 1.66A, please increase the voltage until 1.66A is reached, I will deal with resistance control".

My question is:

When is utilizing 7 V × 2.5 A, when 9 V × 2 A and when 12 V × 1.5 A more suitable? The latter two deliver the same Wattage.

The FastCharge 2.0 standard has these charging specifications in the exact same charger (a VoltCraft car charger):

  • 5 V up to 2.0 A (10 W max.)
  • 7 V up to 2.5 A (17.5 W max.)
  • 9 V up to 2.0 A (18 W max.)
  • 12 V up to 1.5 A (18 W max.)

So the 7 V, 9 V and 12 V modes deliver pretty much the same power. The phone automatically adjusts to the supplied voltage. Some smartphones such as UlePhone Armor2 support 9V2A and 12V×1.5A.

For cables with higher resistance (i.e. long cables), the phone can 'request an increase of power' from the charger to compensate for the increased cable losses. So it's, "I want 1.66A, please increase the voltage until 1.66A is reached, I will deal with resistance control".

My question is:

When is utilizing 7 V × 2.5 A, when 9 V × 2 A and when 12 V × 1.5 A more suitable? The latter two deliver the same Wattage.

3 VoltCraft
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The FastCharge 2.0 standard has these charging specifications in the exact same charger (a VoltCraft car charger):

  • 5 V up to 2.0 A (10 W max.)
  • 7 V up to 2.5 A (17.5 W max.)
  • 9 V up to 2.0 A (18 W max.)
  • 12 V up to 1.5 A (18 W max.)

So the 7 V, 9 V and 12 V modes deliver pretty much the same power. The phone automatically adjusts to the supplied voltage. Some smartphones such as UlePhone Armor2 support 9V2A and 12V×1.5A.

For cables with higher resistance (i.e. long cables), the phone can 'request an increase of power' from the charger to compensate for the increased cable losses. So it's, "I want 1.66A, please increase the voltage until 1.66A is reached, I will deal with resistance control".

My question is:

When is utilizing 7 V × 2.5 A, when 9 V × 2 A and when 12 V × 1.5 A more suitable? The latter two deliver the same Wattage.

The FastCharge 2.0 standard has these charging specifications:

  • 5 V up to 2.0 A (10 W max.)
  • 7 V up to 2.5 A (17.5 W max.)
  • 9 V up to 2.0 A (18 W max.)
  • 12 V up to 1.5 A (18 W max.)

So the 7 V, 9 V and 12 V modes deliver pretty much the same power. The phone automatically adjusts to the supplied voltage.

For cables with higher resistance (i.e. long cables), the phone can 'request an increase of power' from the charger to compensate for the increased cable losses. So it's, "I want 1.66A, please increase the voltage until 1.66A is reached, I will deal with resistance control".

My question is:

When is utilizing 7 V × 2.5 A, when 9 V × 2 A and when 12 V × 1.5 A more suitable? The latter two deliver the same Wattage.

The FastCharge 2.0 standard has these charging specifications in the exact same charger (a VoltCraft car charger):

  • 5 V up to 2.0 A (10 W max.)
  • 7 V up to 2.5 A (17.5 W max.)
  • 9 V up to 2.0 A (18 W max.)
  • 12 V up to 1.5 A (18 W max.)

So the 7 V, 9 V and 12 V modes deliver pretty much the same power. The phone automatically adjusts to the supplied voltage. Some smartphones such as UlePhone Armor2 support 9V2A and 12V×1.5A.

For cables with higher resistance (i.e. long cables), the phone can 'request an increase of power' from the charger to compensate for the increased cable losses. So it's, "I want 1.66A, please increase the voltage until 1.66A is reached, I will deal with resistance control".

My question is:

When is utilizing 7 V × 2.5 A, when 9 V × 2 A and when 12 V × 1.5 A more suitable? The latter two deliver the same Wattage.

2 Tidied and clarified.
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Fast changingcharging 2.0: 7V×2.5A, 9V×2A or 12V×1.5A?

[not_important]I have rewritten the following question, because my mobile phone managed to lose it during posting. Instead of posting, it did just reload the page and ditch me with blank fields. Never rely on mobile phones. Desktop STILL beats mobile.[/not_important]

The FastCharge 2.0 standard has these charging specifications:

  • 5V5 V up to 2A = 10W2.0 A (10 W max.)
  • 7V7 V up to 2.5A = 175 A (17.5W5 W max.)
  • 9V9 V up to 2A = 18W2.0 A (18 W max.)
  • 12V12 V up to 1.5A = 18W5 A (18 W max.)

So the 7V7 V, 9V9 V and 12V12 V modes deliver pretty much the identical resultssame power. The phone automatically adjusts to the desiredsupplied voltage. 

For cables with highhigher resistance (i.e. long cables), the phone can request an increase of power'request an increase of power' from the charger, in order to compensate (efor the increased cable losses.g So it's, "I want 1.: "I want 1.66A, please increase the voltage until 1.66A is reached. I will deal with resistance control.")66A, please increase the voltage until 1.66A is reached, I will deal with resistance control".

Now myMy question is: When is utilizing 7V×2.5A, when 9V×2A and when 12V×1.5A more suitable? The

When is utilizing 7 V × 2.5 A, when 9 V × 2 A and when 12 V × 1.5 A more suitable? The latter two ones deliver the identical wattagesame Wattage.

Fast changing 2.0: 7V×2.5A 9V×2A or 12V×1.5A?

[not_important]I have rewritten the following question, because my mobile phone managed to lose it during posting. Instead of posting, it did just reload the page and ditch me with blank fields. Never rely on mobile phones. Desktop STILL beats mobile.[/not_important]

The FastCharge 2.0 standard has these charging specifications:

  • 5V up to 2A = 10W.
  • 7V up to 2.5A = 17.5W
  • 9V up to 2A = 18W.
  • 12V up to 1.5A = 18W.

So the 7V, 9V and 12V modes deliver pretty much the identical results. The phone automatically adjusts the desired voltage. For cables with high resistance (i.e. long cables), the phone can request an increase of power from the charger, in order to compensate (e.g.: "I want 1.66A, please increase the voltage until 1.66A is reached. I will deal with resistance control.").

Now my question is: When is utilizing 7V×2.5A, when 9V×2A and when 12V×1.5A more suitable? The latter two ones deliver the identical wattage.

Fast charging 2.0: 7V×2.5A, 9V×2A or 12V×1.5A?

The FastCharge 2.0 standard has these charging specifications:

  • 5 V up to 2.0 A (10 W max.)
  • 7 V up to 2.5 A (17.5 W max.)
  • 9 V up to 2.0 A (18 W max.)
  • 12 V up to 1.5 A (18 W max.)

So the 7 V, 9 V and 12 V modes deliver pretty much the same power. The phone automatically adjusts to the supplied voltage. 

For cables with higher resistance (i.e. long cables), the phone can 'request an increase of power' from the charger to compensate for the increased cable losses. So it's, "I want 1.66A, please increase the voltage until 1.66A is reached, I will deal with resistance control".

My question is:

When is utilizing 7 V × 2.5 A, when 9 V × 2 A and when 12 V × 1.5 A more suitable? The latter two deliver the same Wattage.

1
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