2 added 601 characters in body
source | link

What's important to the fabrication shop is not the size of the individual board, but the size of the panel it will be made in. Meaning, typically PCBs are made with multiple images on a panel, and then cut apart either before delivery or after component assembly.

And, yes, there are (semi-)standard panel sizes.

Among those standards, different shops will be set up for different ones. However, every shop I know offers 18 x 24 inches as a standard size.

There are lots of other sizes available, so if 18 x 24 doesn't work for you, contact your shop to see what else they offer.

If the total area of your order (plus some allowances I'll mention below) is less than the smallest panel your vendor can handle, you'll end up paying for some waste. If you try to absolutely maximize the usage of a panel, the vendor is likely to run one extra panel to allow them to still deliver your order if there's a defect in one location, and again you'll pay (a fairly small amount) for this extra panel to be made and then discarded. If you design your board to fit (for example) 12 to a panel, and then only order 10 boards, you're likely to get about the best pricing you can hope for.

When deciding how to panelize your board, you also need to consider the routing allowance needed between the boards and gutter allowance along the edges to allow for handling. In my experience, typical minimums for these are 0.2 and 0.25 inches, but different shops may have different requirements, so confirm this with your shop.

If the boards will be assembled (pick & place'd) in panel form, you should also verify the edge gutter requirement with your assembly shop.

What's important to the fabrication shop is not the size of the individual board, but the size of the panel it will be made in. Meaning, typically PCBs are made with multiple images on a panel, and then cut apart either before delivery or after component assembly.

And, yes, there are (semi-)standard panel sizes.

Among those standards, different shops will be set up for different ones. However, every shop I know offers 18 x 24 inches as a standard size.

There are lots of other sizes available, so if 18 x 24 doesn't work for you, contact your shop to see what else they offer.

When deciding how to panelize your board, you also need to consider the routing allowance needed between the boards and gutter allowance along the edges to allow for handling. In my experience, typical minimums for these are 0.2 and 0.25 inches, but different shops may have different requirements, so confirm this with your shop.

If the boards will be assembled (pick & place'd) in panel form, you should also verify the edge gutter requirement with your assembly shop.

What's important to the fabrication shop is not the size of the individual board, but the size of the panel it will be made in. Meaning, typically PCBs are made with multiple images on a panel, and then cut apart either before delivery or after component assembly.

And, yes, there are (semi-)standard panel sizes.

Among those standards, different shops will be set up for different ones. However, every shop I know offers 18 x 24 inches as a standard size.

There are lots of other sizes available, so if 18 x 24 doesn't work for you, contact your shop to see what else they offer.

If the total area of your order (plus some allowances I'll mention below) is less than the smallest panel your vendor can handle, you'll end up paying for some waste. If you try to absolutely maximize the usage of a panel, the vendor is likely to run one extra panel to allow them to still deliver your order if there's a defect in one location, and again you'll pay (a fairly small amount) for this extra panel to be made and then discarded. If you design your board to fit (for example) 12 to a panel, and then only order 10 boards, you're likely to get about the best pricing you can hope for.

When deciding how to panelize your board, you also need to consider the routing allowance needed between the boards and gutter allowance along the edges to allow for handling. In my experience, typical minimums for these are 0.2 and 0.25 inches, but different shops may have different requirements, so confirm this with your shop.

If the boards will be assembled (pick & place'd) in panel form, you should also verify the edge gutter requirement with your assembly shop.

1
source | link

What's important to the fabrication shop is not the size of the individual board, but the size of the panel it will be made in. Meaning, typically PCBs are made with multiple images on a panel, and then cut apart either before delivery or after component assembly.

And, yes, there are (semi-)standard panel sizes.

Among those standards, different shops will be set up for different ones. However, every shop I know offers 18 x 24 inches as a standard size.

There are lots of other sizes available, so if 18 x 24 doesn't work for you, contact your shop to see what else they offer.

When deciding how to panelize your board, you also need to consider the routing allowance needed between the boards and gutter allowance along the edges to allow for handling. In my experience, typical minimums for these are 0.2 and 0.25 inches, but different shops may have different requirements, so confirm this with your shop.

If the boards will be assembled (pick & place'd) in panel form, you should also verify the edge gutter requirement with your assembly shop.