3 Added schematic of active zener diode.
source | link

In a word - NO. It is rated for 60 volts input, but output has resistors and capacitors to ground. The difference between input and output can be 60 volts minus 1.25 volts. The LM317HV is called 'High-Voltage' because most regulators of that type have a 40 volt limit.

That is why in the application images it shows a output of 50 volts with an input of 60 volts or less.

This is a limit set forth in section 6.1 of the pdf.

Input–output voltage differential −0.3 60 V

Since the output has resistors and loads connected to ground, the device is essentially referenced to ground for voltage adjust and loads. You are limited to the 60 volt MAXIMUM input.

You can use a beefy zener diode to raise ground up 140 volts or more, but this becomes your new 'ground' reference and if it shorts the LM317 will short out as well. It can be done if you accept the risk...

Below is an 'Active' zener diode using a bjt to boost the load current. For high voltage and high current Q1 becomes a bit expensive. It can be replaced with a MOSFET if high power is required.

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

In a word - NO. It is rated for 60 volts input, but output has resistors and capacitors to ground. The difference between input and output can be 60 volts minus 1.25 volts. The LM317HV is called 'High-Voltage' because most regulators of that type have a 40 volt limit.

That is why in the application images it shows a output of 50 volts with an input of 60 volts or less.

This is a limit set forth in section 6.1 of the pdf.

Input–output voltage differential −0.3 60 V

Since the output has resistors and loads connected to ground, the device is essentially referenced to ground for voltage adjust and loads. You are limited to the 60 volt MAXIMUM input.

You can use a beefy zener diode to raise ground up 140 volts or more, but this becomes your new 'ground' reference and if it shorts the LM317 will short out as well. It can be done if you accept the risk...

In a word - NO. It is rated for 60 volts input, but output has resistors and capacitors to ground. The difference between input and output can be 60 volts minus 1.25 volts. The LM317HV is called 'High-Voltage' because most regulators of that type have a 40 volt limit.

That is why in the application images it shows a output of 50 volts with an input of 60 volts or less.

This is a limit set forth in section 6.1 of the pdf.

Input–output voltage differential −0.3 60 V

Since the output has resistors and loads connected to ground, the device is essentially referenced to ground for voltage adjust and loads. You are limited to the 60 volt MAXIMUM input.

You can use a beefy zener diode to raise ground up 140 volts or more, but this becomes your new 'ground' reference and if it shorts the LM317 will short out as well. It can be done if you accept the risk...

Below is an 'Active' zener diode using a bjt to boost the load current. For high voltage and high current Q1 becomes a bit expensive. It can be replaced with a MOSFET if high power is required.

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

2 Added quote from pdf users guide. Added last paragraph.
source | link

In a word - NO. It is rated for 60 volts input, but output has resistors and capacitors to ground. The difference between input and output can be 60 volts minus 1.25 volts. The LM317HV is called 'High-Voltage' because most regulators of that type have a 40 volt limit.

That is why in the application images it shows a output of 50 volts with an input of 60 volts or less.

This is a limit set forth in section 6.1 of the pdf.

Input–output voltage differential −0.3 60 V

Since the output has resistors and loads connected to ground, the device is essentially referenced to ground for voltage adjust and loads. You are limited to the 60 volt MAXIMUM input.

You can use a beefy zener diode to raise ground up 140 volts or more, but this becomes your new 'ground' reference and if it shorts the LM317 will short out as well. It can be done if you accept the risk...

In a word - NO. It is rated for 60 volts input, but output has resistors and capacitors to ground. The difference between input and output can be 60 volts minus 1.25 volts.

That is why in the application images it shows a output of 50 volts with an input of 60 volts or less.

In a word - NO. It is rated for 60 volts input, but output has resistors and capacitors to ground. The difference between input and output can be 60 volts minus 1.25 volts. The LM317HV is called 'High-Voltage' because most regulators of that type have a 40 volt limit.

That is why in the application images it shows a output of 50 volts with an input of 60 volts or less.

This is a limit set forth in section 6.1 of the pdf.

Input–output voltage differential −0.3 60 V

Since the output has resistors and loads connected to ground, the device is essentially referenced to ground for voltage adjust and loads. You are limited to the 60 volt MAXIMUM input.

You can use a beefy zener diode to raise ground up 140 volts or more, but this becomes your new 'ground' reference and if it shorts the LM317 will short out as well. It can be done if you accept the risk...

1
source | link

In a word - NO. It is rated for 60 volts input, but output has resistors and capacitors to ground. The difference between input and output can be 60 volts minus 1.25 volts.

That is why in the application images it shows a output of 50 volts with an input of 60 volts or less.