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Why are Accelerometersaccelerometers (and other MEMS devices) so rarely integrated into components?

With the way things are headed, more and more functionality moves into a single chip each year. However, one thing that seems to remain completely untouched by this is MEMS devices like accelerometers and Gyrosgyros.

Despite many device classes practically requiring accelerometers, integrating MEMS into chips seems astonishingly rare, except for a few expensive (and weak) outliers by ST and Bosch. I assume the reason is technical.

In particular I'm interested in the following questions:

  1. What makes them so rare?
  2. Do process differences have an impact on this?
  3. How do the components that do exist circumvent these problem(s)?

Why are Accelerometers (and other MEMS devices) so rarely integrated into components?

With the way things are headed, more and more functionality moves into a single chip each year. However, one thing that seems to remain completely untouched by this is MEMS devices like accelerometers and Gyros.

Despite many device classes practically requiring accelerometers, integrating MEMS into chips seems astonishingly rare, except for a few expensive (and weak) outliers by ST and Bosch. I assume the reason is technical.

In particular I'm interested in the following questions:

  1. What makes them so rare?
  2. Do process differences have an impact on this?
  3. How do the components that do exist circumvent these problem(s)?

Why are accelerometers (and other MEMS devices) so rarely integrated into components?

With the way things are headed, more and more functionality moves into a single chip each year. However, one thing that seems to remain completely untouched by this is MEMS devices like accelerometers and gyros.

Despite many device classes practically requiring accelerometers, integrating MEMS into chips seems astonishingly rare, except for a few expensive (and weak) outliers by ST and Bosch. I assume the reason is technical.

In particular I'm interested in the following questions:

  1. What makes them so rare?
  2. Do process differences have an impact on this?
  3. How do the components that do exist circumvent these problem(s)?
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With the way things are headed, more and more functionality moves into a single chip each year. However, one thing that seems to remain completely untouched by this is MEMS devices like accelerometers and Gyros.

Despite many device classes practically requiring accelerometers, integrating MEMS into chips seems astonishingly rare, except for a few expensive (and weak) outliers by ST and Bosch. I assume the reason is technical.

In particular I'm interested in the following questions:

  1. What makes them so rare?
  2. Do process differences have an impact on this?
  3. How do the existing components that do exist circumvent these problem(s)?

With the way things are headed, more and more functionality moves into a single chip each year. However, one thing that seems to remain completely untouched by this is MEMS devices like accelerometers and Gyros.

Despite many device classes practically requiring accelerometers, integrating MEMS into chips seems astonishingly rare, except for a few expensive (and weak) outliers by ST and Bosch.

In particular I'm interested in the following questions:

  1. What makes them so rare?
  2. Do process differences have an impact on this?
  3. How do the existing components circumvent these problem(s)?

With the way things are headed, more and more functionality moves into a single chip each year. However, one thing that seems to remain completely untouched by this is MEMS devices like accelerometers and Gyros.

Despite many device classes practically requiring accelerometers, integrating MEMS into chips seems astonishingly rare, except for a few expensive (and weak) outliers by ST and Bosch. I assume the reason is technical.

In particular I'm interested in the following questions:

  1. What makes them so rare?
  2. Do process differences have an impact on this?
  3. How do the components that do exist circumvent these problem(s)?
1
source | link

Why are Accelerometers (and other MEMS devices) so rarely integrated into components?

With the way things are headed, more and more functionality moves into a single chip each year. However, one thing that seems to remain completely untouched by this is MEMS devices like accelerometers and Gyros.

Despite many device classes practically requiring accelerometers, integrating MEMS into chips seems astonishingly rare, except for a few expensive (and weak) outliers by ST and Bosch.

In particular I'm interested in the following questions:

  1. What makes them so rare?
  2. Do process differences have an impact on this?
  3. How do the existing components circumvent these problem(s)?