Post Undeleted by Sunnyskyguy EE75
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Typically speakers are rated for power in RMS but may be fake spec’d in peak power limits for marketing bias reasons or best case with both.

I agree with all the above (5comments5 comments at the time of writing)

There are 3 considerations : speaker damage due to:
1) heat,
2) excessive bass travel on cone and ...
3) clipping or high THD with wide dynamic range bursts not found on highly compressed radio music. Excessive peaks can cause gross odd harmonic distortion from clipping or gradual rapid rise in THD from coil travel outside the magnet edge and reduction of magnet strength from a 40’C rise or more of sustained Max power boom box operation.

Therefore it is possible to use a 20W design amp on a 10W speaker as long as you realize the risks of pushing it to output limits and the type of music or voice demands an appreciation of what is often called the crest factor of peak / rms ratio.

Given the supply voltage demands for linear bipolar amps and single supply bridge amps and class D,E etc varies, the supply must be able to meet the peak power load and RMS load specs you define for the reasons I suggested.

The most efficient would be a Class D bridge amp with 12V single supply requiring no huge caps for AC coupling.

Typically speakers are rated for power in RMS but may be fake spec’d in peak power limits for marketing bias reasons or best case with both.

I agree with all the above (5comments at the time of writing)

There are 3 considerations : speaker damage due to:
1) heat,
2) excessive bass travel on cone and
3) clipping with wide dynamic range bursts not found on highly compressed radio music.

Therefore it is possible to use a 20W design amp on a 10W speaker as long as you realize the risks of pushing it to output limits and the type of music or voice demands an appreciation of what is often called the crest factor of peak / rms ratio.

Given the supply voltage demands for linear bipolar amps and single supply bridge amps and class D,E etc varies, the supply must be able to meet the peak power load and RMS load specs you define for the reasons I suggested.

Typically speakers are rated for power in RMS but may be fake spec’d in peak power limits for marketing bias reasons or best case with both.

I agree with all the above (5 comments at the time of writing)

There are 3 considerations : speaker damage due to:
1) heat,
2) excessive bass travel on cone and ...
3) clipping or high THD with wide dynamic range bursts not found on highly compressed radio music. Excessive peaks can cause gross odd harmonic distortion from clipping or gradual rapid rise in THD from coil travel outside the magnet edge and reduction of magnet strength from a 40’C rise or more of sustained Max power boom box operation.

Therefore it is possible to use a 20W design amp on a 10W speaker as long as you realize the risks of pushing it to output limits and the type of music or voice demands an appreciation of what is often called the crest factor of peak / rms ratio.

Given the supply voltage demands for linear bipolar amps and single supply bridge amps and class D,E etc varies, the supply must be able to meet the peak power load and RMS load specs you define for the reasons I suggested.

The most efficient would be a Class D bridge amp with 12V single supply requiring no huge caps for AC coupling.

    Post Deleted by Sunnyskyguy EE75
1
source | link

Typically speakers are rated for power in RMS but may be fake spec’d in peak power limits for marketing bias reasons or best case with both.

I agree with all the above (5comments at the time of writing)

There are 3 considerations : speaker damage due to:
1) heat,
2) excessive bass travel on cone and
3) clipping with wide dynamic range bursts not found on highly compressed radio music.

Therefore it is possible to use a 20W design amp on a 10W speaker as long as you realize the risks of pushing it to output limits and the type of music or voice demands an appreciation of what is often called the crest factor of peak / rms ratio.

Given the supply voltage demands for linear bipolar amps and single supply bridge amps and class D,E etc varies, the supply must be able to meet the peak power load and RMS load specs you define for the reasons I suggested.