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I was asked a question in my lab viva today, on a triac switch supplying a fixed value inductor of 0.2 henry. How will the current and voltage of the inductor vary, if the triac's firing angle was varied between 90 to 120 degrees? Explain the nature of inductors voltage under different firing angles.

My answer was that the voltage will follow the relationship of

$$V_{load}=V_{peak} \cdot \sqrt{\frac{2\pi-2\phi+\sin 2\phi}{4\pi}}$$

which I derived there only and the inductor current will be out of the phase lagging by 90 degrees to voltage.

Vpeak is the peak voltage of the ac mains supply and \$\phi\$ is the firing angle of the triac.

Apparently, this wasn't the correct answer maybe.

So, what might be the correct answer to this or perhaps the correct generalized way to answer this question?

I was asked a question in my lab viva today, on a triac switch supplying a fixed value inductor of 0.2 henry. How will the current and voltage of the inductor vary, if the triac's firing angle was varied between 90 to 120 degrees? Explain the nature of inductors voltage under different firing angles.

My answer was that the voltage will follow the relationship of

$$V_{load}=V_{peak} \cdot \sqrt{\frac{2\pi-2\phi+\sin 2\phi}{4\pi}}$$

which I derived there only and the inductor current will be out of the phase lagging by 90 degrees to voltage.

Vpeak is the peak voltage of the ac mains supply and \$\phi\$ is the firing angle of the triac.

Apparently, this wasn't the correct answer maybe.

So, what might be the correct answer to this or perhaps the correct generalized way to answer this question?

I was asked a question in my lab viva today, on a triac switch supplying a fixed value inductor of 0.2 henry. How will the current and voltage of the inductor vary, if the triac's firing angle was varied between 90 to 120 degrees? Explain the nature of inductors voltage under different firing angles.

My answer was that the voltage will follow the relationship of

$$V_{load}=V_{peak} \cdot \sqrt{\frac{2\pi-2\phi+\sin 2\phi}{4\pi}}$$

which I derived there only and the inductor current will be out of the phase lagging by 90 degrees to voltage.

Vpeak is the peak voltage of the ac mains supply and \$\phi\$ is the firing angle of the triac.

Apparently, this wasn't the correct answer maybe.

So, what might be the correct answer to this or perhaps the correct generalized way to answer this question?

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I was asked a question in my lab viva today, on a triac switch supplying a fixed value inductor of 0.2 henry. The question was, howHow will the current and voltage of the inductor might vary, if the triac's firing angle was varied between 090 to 180120 degrees? Explain the nature of inductors voltage under different firing angles.

My answer was that the voltage will follow the relationship of

$$V_{load}=V_{peak} \cdot \sqrt{\frac{2\pi-2\phi+\sin 2\phi}{4\pi}}$$

which I derived there only and the inductor current will be out of the phase lagging by 90 degrees to voltage.

Vpeak is the peak voltage of the ac mains supply and \$\phi\$ is the firing angle of the triac.

Apparently, this wasn't the correct answer maybe.

So, what might be the correct answer to this or perhaps the correct generalized way to answer this question?

I was asked a question in my lab viva today, on a triac switch supplying a fixed value inductor. The question was, how will the current and voltage of the inductor might vary, if the triac's firing angle was varied between 0 to 180 degrees?

My answer was that the voltage will follow the relationship of

$$V_{load}=V_{peak} \cdot \sqrt{\frac{2\pi-2\phi+\sin 2\phi}{4\pi}}$$

which I derived there only and the inductor current will be out of the phase lagging by 90 degrees to voltage.

Vpeak is the peak voltage of the ac mains supply and \$\phi\$ is the firing angle of the triac.

Apparently, this wasn't the correct answer maybe.

So, what might be the correct answer to this or perhaps the correct generalized way to answer this question?

I was asked a question in my lab viva today, on a triac switch supplying a fixed value inductor of 0.2 henry. How will the current and voltage of the inductor vary, if the triac's firing angle was varied between 90 to 120 degrees? Explain the nature of inductors voltage under different firing angles.

My answer was that the voltage will follow the relationship of

$$V_{load}=V_{peak} \cdot \sqrt{\frac{2\pi-2\phi+\sin 2\phi}{4\pi}}$$

which I derived there only and the inductor current will be out of the phase lagging by 90 degrees to voltage.

Vpeak is the peak voltage of the ac mains supply and \$\phi\$ is the firing angle of the triac.

Apparently, this wasn't the correct answer maybe.

So, what might be the correct answer to this or perhaps the correct generalized way to answer this question?

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