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I agree with most of what @misunderstood said except the specs. Here are my own opinions.

Charging voltage: 12.6V - 13.0V is specified by 3S,10A Protection board on vendor detail link with 10A max if ambient is cool.

  • This assumes you have a smart charger that cuts off when charge current reduces to 10% at 4.2V/cell and not a 12V 10A supply but can be made to work if adjustable with pot or drop 0.7V with one 15A power diode. Thus 11.3V/3=3.77V/cell to 3.8V max. But since you have a steady load, that wont work with a smart charger.

  • I suggest a small cooling fan for both PS and protection board with an air plenum retrofited to flow thru both rather than over the top so nothing is burning hot to touch.

  • Do you understand that most LEDstrips for white have a dim threshold just below 9V and can be operated from car voltage of 14.2 V from built in current limiting resistors , you won’t draw maximum current or radiate maximum brightness of LEDs. But if your strip is rated at 4.5A at 12V , two strips will exceed your 10A supply and rating if the supply is 14.2V.

  • So if you don’t mind a reduction of 0.7V reduction in nominal brightness at 12V, the apparent brightness will be ok but 2.3/3V rise above 9V or 77% of nominal brightness.

  • if you can specify the LEDstrip’s actual current vs voltage then perhaps a better solution is possible like 15V @ tbd A with 4 cells. Then drop 0.7V to achieve 14.3V with one 20A power diode to reduce both The battery (4S) and 15V float charger voltage12V.

  • if you can specify the LEDstrip’s actual current vs voltage then perhaps a better solution is possible like 15V @ tbd A with 4 cells.

Perhaps then drop 15V by 0.7V to achieve 14.3V (marginal hot LEDs) with one 15A to 20A power diode to reduce both the battery (4S) and 15V float charger voltage to 14.2~14.3.

There is some 15%temporary 20% or so reduction in cell mA capacity by using 3.8V float and not charging to 4.2V/ std Li Ion cell but at least you wont accelerate the aging rate keeping it overcharged above 3.8V for long durations.

These are just my opinions.. Your mileage may vary.

I agree with most of what @misunderstood said except the specs. Here are my own opinions.

Charging voltage: 12.6V - 13.0V is specified by 3S,10A Protection board on vendor detail link with 10A max if ambient is cool.

  • This assumes you have a smart charger that cuts off when charge current reduces to 10% at 4.2V/cell and not a 12V 10A supply but can be made to work if adjustable with pot or drop 0.7V with one 15A power diode. Thus 11.3V/3=3.77V/cell to 3.8V max. But since you have a steady load, that wont work with a smart charger.

  • I suggest a small cooling fan for both PS and protection board with an air plenum retrofited to flow thru both rather than over the top so nothing is burning hot to touch.

  • Do you understand that most LEDstrips for white have a dim threshold just below 9V and can be operated from car voltage of 14.2 V from built in current limiting resistors , you won’t draw maximum current or radiate maximum brightness of LEDs. But if your strip is rated at 4.5A at 12V , two strips will exceed your 10A supply and rating if the supply is 14.2V.

  • So if you don’t mind a reduction of 0.7V reduction in nominal brightness at 12V, the apparent brightness will be ok but 2.3/3V rise above 9V or 77% of nominal brightness.

  • if you can specify the LEDstrip’s actual current vs voltage then perhaps a better solution is possible like 15V @ tbd A with 4 cells. Then drop 0.7V to achieve 14.3V with one 20A power diode to reduce both The battery (4S) and 15V float charger voltage.

There is some 15% or so reduction in cell mA capacity by not charging to 4.2V/ std Li Ion cell but at least you wont accelerate the aging rate keeping it overcharged above 3.8V for long durations.

These are just my opinions.. Your mileage may vary.

I agree with most of what @misunderstood said except the specs. Here are my own opinions.

Charging voltage: 12.6V - 13.0V is specified by 3S,10A Protection board on vendor detail link with 10A max if ambient is cool.

  • This assumes you have a smart charger that cuts off when charge current reduces to 10% at 4.2V/cell and not a 12V 10A supply but can be made to work if adjustable with pot or drop 0.7V with one 15A power diode. Thus 11.3V/3=3.77V/cell to 3.8V max. But since you have a steady load, that wont work with a smart charger.

  • I suggest a small cooling fan for both PS and protection board with an air plenum retrofited to flow thru both rather than over the top so nothing is burning hot to touch.

  • Do you understand that most LEDstrips for white have a dim threshold just below 9V and can be operated from car voltage of 14.2 V from built in current limiting resistors , you won’t draw maximum current or radiate maximum brightness of LEDs. But if your strip is rated at 4.5A at 12V , two strips will exceed your 10A supply and rating if the supply is 14.2V.

  • So if you don’t mind a reduction of 0.7V reduction in nominal brightness at 12V, the apparent brightness will be ok but 2.3/3V rise above 9V or 77% of nominal brightness @ 12V.

  • if you can specify the LEDstrip’s actual current vs voltage then perhaps a better solution is possible like 15V @ tbd A with 4 cells.

Perhaps then drop 15V by 0.7V to achieve 14.3V (marginal hot LEDs) with one 15A to 20A power diode to reduce both the battery (4S) and 15V float charger voltage to 14.2~14.3.

There is some temporary 20% or so reduction in cell mA capacity by using 3.8V float and not charging to 4.2V/ std Li Ion cell but at least you wont accelerate the aging rate keeping it overcharged above 3.8V for long durations.

These are just my opinions.. Your mileage may vary.

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I agree with most of what @misunderstood said except the specs. Here are my own opinions.

Charging voltage: 12.6V - 13.0V is specified by 3S,10A Protection board on vendor detail link with 10A max if ambient is cool.

  • This assumes you have a smart charger that cuts off when charge current reduces to 10% at 4.2V/cell and not a 12V 10A supply but can be made to work if adjustable with pot or drop 0.7V with one 15A power diode. Thus 11.3V/3=3.77V/cell to 3.8V max. But since you have a steady load, that wont work with a smart charger.

  • I suggest a small cooling fan for both PS and protection board with an air plenum retrofited to flow thru both rather than over the top so nothing is burning hot to touch.

  • Do you understand that most LEDstrips for white have a dim threshold just below 9V and can be operated from car voltage of 14.2 V from built in current limiting resistors , you won’t draw maximum current or radiate maximum brightness of LEDs. But if your strip is rated at 4.5A at 12V , two strips will exceed your 10A supply and rating if the supply is 14.2V.

  • So if you don’t mind a reduction of 0.7V reduction in nominal brightness at 12V, the apparent brightness will be ok but 2.3/3V rise above 9V or 77% of nominal brightness.

  • if you can specify the LEDstrip’s actual current vs voltage then perhaps a better solution is possible like 15V @ tbd A with 4 cells. Then drop 0.7V to achieve 14.3V with one 20A power diode to reduce both The battery (4S) and 15V float charger voltage.

There is some 15% or so reduction in cell mA capacity by not charging to 4.2V/ std Li Ion cell but at least you wont accelerate the aging rate keeping it overcharged above 3.8V for long durations.

These are just my opinions.. Your mileage may vary.