3 correct claim that shorted D+ D- is "Chinese"
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This is a bit of misunderstanding. The short between D+ and D- (resistor less than 200 Ohms) is the signature of Chinese charging standardUSB Battery Charging 1.2 Dedicated Charging Port on the SIDE OF CHARGER. On device (consumer) side you don't need this. In best case you should attempt to detect the short in order to determine if the port is capable of charging above the default USB power (500 mA or 900 mA).

ID has no relevance in the case of device, and shield can be safely tied with ground.

If your device consumes up to 600 mA at 3.3 V, you can design a switching-type voltage regulator (SMPS buck converter) instead of LDO. The SMPS will transform consumed current, so on the 5-V side it will consume under 500 mA (accounting for 85-90% efficiency). In this case you should not worry about USB port limitations, and your device will be happy with nearly any USB port.

This is a bit of misunderstanding. The short between D+ and D- (resistor less than 200 Ohms) is the signature of Chinese charging standard on the SIDE OF CHARGER. On device (consumer) side you don't need this. In best case you should attempt to detect the short in order to determine if the port is capable of charging above the default USB power (500 mA or 900 mA).

ID has no relevance in the case of device, and shield can be safely tied with ground.

If your device consumes up to 600 mA at 3.3 V, you can design a switching-type voltage regulator (SMPS buck converter) instead of LDO. The SMPS will transform consumed current, so on the 5-V side it will consume under 500 mA (accounting for 85-90% efficiency). In this case you should not worry about USB port limitations, and your device will be happy with nearly any USB port.

This is a bit of misunderstanding. The short between D+ and D- (resistor less than 200 Ohms) is the signature of USB Battery Charging 1.2 Dedicated Charging Port on the SIDE OF CHARGER. On device (consumer) side you don't need this. In best case you should attempt to detect the short in order to determine if the port is capable of charging above the default USB power (500 mA or 900 mA).

ID has no relevance in the case of device, and shield can be safely tied with ground.

If your device consumes up to 600 mA at 3.3 V, you can design a switching-type voltage regulator (SMPS buck converter) instead of LDO. The SMPS will transform consumed current, so on the 5-V side it will consume under 500 mA (accounting for 85-90% efficiency). In this case you should not worry about USB port limitations, and your device will be happy with nearly any USB port.

2 added 4 characters in body
source | link

This is a bit of misunderstanding. The short between D+ and D- (resistor less than 200 Ohms) is the signature of Chinese charging standard on the SIDE OF CHARGER. On device (consumer) side you don't need this. In best case you should attempt to detect the short in order to determine if the port is capable of charging above the default USB power (500 mA or 900 mA).

ID has no relevance in the case of device, and shield can be safely tied with ground.

If your device consumes up to 600 mA at 3.3 V, you can design a switching-type voltage regulator (SMPS buck converter) instead of LDO. The SMPS will transform consumed current, so on the 5-V side it will consume under 500 mA (accounting for 85-90% lossesefficiency). In this case you should not worry about USB port limitations, and your device will be happy with nearly any USB port.

This is a bit of misunderstanding. The short between D+ and D- (resistor less than 200 Ohms) is the signature of Chinese charging standard on the SIDE OF CHARGER. On device (consumer) side you don't need this. In best case you should attempt to detect the short in order to determine if the port is capable of charging above the default USB power (500 mA or 900 mA).

ID has no relevance in the case of device, and shield can be safely tied with ground.

If your device consumes up to 600 mA at 3.3 V, you can design a switching-type voltage regulator (SMPS buck converter) instead of LDO. The SMPS will transform consumed current, so on the 5-V side it will consume under 500 mA (accounting for 85-90% losses). In this case you should not worry about USB port limitations, and your device will be happy with nearly any USB port.

This is a bit of misunderstanding. The short between D+ and D- (resistor less than 200 Ohms) is the signature of Chinese charging standard on the SIDE OF CHARGER. On device (consumer) side you don't need this. In best case you should attempt to detect the short in order to determine if the port is capable of charging above the default USB power (500 mA or 900 mA).

ID has no relevance in the case of device, and shield can be safely tied with ground.

If your device consumes up to 600 mA at 3.3 V, you can design a switching-type voltage regulator (SMPS buck converter) instead of LDO. The SMPS will transform consumed current, so on the 5-V side it will consume under 500 mA (accounting for 85-90% efficiency). In this case you should not worry about USB port limitations, and your device will be happy with nearly any USB port.

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source | link

This is a bit of misunderstanding. The short between D+ and D- (resistor less than 200 Ohms) is the signature of Chinese charging standard on the SIDE OF CHARGER. On device (consumer) side you don't need this. In best case you should attempt to detect the short in order to determine if the port is capable of charging above the default USB power (500 mA or 900 mA).

ID has no relevance in the case of device, and shield can be safely tied with ground.

If your device consumes up to 600 mA at 3.3 V, you can design a switching-type voltage regulator (SMPS buck converter) instead of LDO. The SMPS will transform consumed current, so on the 5-V side it will consume under 500 mA (accounting for 85-90% losses). In this case you should not worry about USB port limitations, and your device will be happy with nearly any USB port.