3 spelling
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To really simplify, a record has wiggles in the groove that correspond to the recorded sound pressure. (This ignores stereo, and any compoundingcompanding, but it answers your question).

Events are recorded onto that wiggly grove as they happen -- you can think of the groove as a picture of the sound, with the time domain turned into events happening as the needle follows the groove.

If you play the record slower, all the events happen more slowly -- the singer sings slower and deeper, the orchestra does too, etc. Speeding it up does the opposite -- a normal recording, sped up, sounds like a hyperactive chipmunk.

To really simplify, a record has wiggles in the groove that correspond to the recorded sound pressure. (This ignores stereo, and any compounding, but it answers your question).

Events are recorded onto that wiggly grove as they happen -- you can think of the groove as a picture of the sound, with the time domain turned into events happening as the needle follows the groove.

If you play the record slower, all the events happen more slowly -- the singer sings slower and deeper, the orchestra does too, etc. Speeding it up does the opposite -- a normal recording, sped up, sounds like a hyperactive chipmunk.

To really simplify, a record has wiggles in the groove that correspond to the recorded sound pressure. (This ignores stereo, and any companding, but it answers your question).

Events are recorded onto that wiggly grove as they happen -- you can think of the groove as a picture of the sound, with the time domain turned into events happening as the needle follows the groove.

If you play the record slower, all the events happen more slowly -- the singer sings slower and deeper, the orchestra does too, etc. Speeding it up does the opposite -- a normal recording, sped up, sounds like a hyperactive chipmunk.

2 minor spelling correction
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To really simplify, a record has wiggles in the groove that correspond to the recorded sound pressure. (This ignores stereo, and any compandingcompounding, but it answers your question).

Events are recorded onto that wiggly grove as they happen -- you can think of the groove as a picture of the sound, with the time domain turned into events happening as the needle follows the groove.

If you play the record slower, all the events happen more slowly -- the singer sings slower and deeper, the orchestra does too, etc. Speeding it up does the opposite -- a normal recording, speededsped up, sounds like a hyperactive chipmunk.

To really simplify, a record has wiggles in the groove that correspond to the recorded sound pressure. (This ignores stereo, and any companding, but it answers your question).

Events are recorded onto that wiggly grove as they happen -- you can think of the groove as a picture of the sound, with the time domain turned into events happening as the needle follows the groove.

If you play the record slower, all the events happen more slowly -- the singer sings slower and deeper, the orchestra does too, etc. Speeding it up does the opposite -- a normal recording, speeded up, sounds like a hyperactive chipmunk.

To really simplify, a record has wiggles in the groove that correspond to the recorded sound pressure. (This ignores stereo, and any compounding, but it answers your question).

Events are recorded onto that wiggly grove as they happen -- you can think of the groove as a picture of the sound, with the time domain turned into events happening as the needle follows the groove.

If you play the record slower, all the events happen more slowly -- the singer sings slower and deeper, the orchestra does too, etc. Speeding it up does the opposite -- a normal recording, sped up, sounds like a hyperactive chipmunk.

1
source | link

To really simplify, a record has wiggles in the groove that correspond to the recorded sound pressure. (This ignores stereo, and any companding, but it answers your question).

Events are recorded onto that wiggly grove as they happen -- you can think of the groove as a picture of the sound, with the time domain turned into events happening as the needle follows the groove.

If you play the record slower, all the events happen more slowly -- the singer sings slower and deeper, the orchestra does too, etc. Speeding it up does the opposite -- a normal recording, speeded up, sounds like a hyperactive chipmunk.