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drawing

A step-by-step look at how PixelSense works:

  1. A contact (finger/blob/tag/object) is placed on the display
  2. IR back light unit provides light (though the optical sheets, LCD and protection glass) that hits the contact.
  3. Light reflected back from the contact is seen by the integrated sensors
  4. Sensors convert the light signal into an electrical signal/value
  5. Values reported from all of the sensors are used to create a picture of what is on the display
  6. The picture is analyzed using image processing techniques
  7. The output is sent to the PC. It includes the corrected sensor image and various contact types (fingers/blobs/tags)

Source: Microsoft Pixelsense

Also, take a look at Johnny Lee'sa similar conceptual implementation (i.e., IR-camera-based) by Johnny Lee (who in fact is now in the Microsoft team AFAIK): Tracking Fingers with the Wii Remote

drawing

A step-by-step look at how PixelSense works:

  1. A contact (finger/blob/tag/object) is placed on the display
  2. IR back light unit provides light (though the optical sheets, LCD and protection glass) that hits the contact.
  3. Light reflected back from the contact is seen by the integrated sensors
  4. Sensors convert the light signal into an electrical signal/value
  5. Values reported from all of the sensors are used to create a picture of what is on the display
  6. The picture is analyzed using image processing techniques
  7. The output is sent to the PC. It includes the corrected sensor image and various contact types (fingers/blobs/tags)

Source: Microsoft Pixelsense

Also, take a look at Johnny Lee's similar conceptual implementation (i.e., IR-camera-based) in Tracking Fingers with the Wii Remote

drawing

A step-by-step look at how PixelSense works:

  1. A contact (finger/blob/tag/object) is placed on the display
  2. IR back light unit provides light (though the optical sheets, LCD and protection glass) that hits the contact.
  3. Light reflected back from the contact is seen by the integrated sensors
  4. Sensors convert the light signal into an electrical signal/value
  5. Values reported from all of the sensors are used to create a picture of what is on the display
  6. The picture is analyzed using image processing techniques
  7. The output is sent to the PC. It includes the corrected sensor image and various contact types (fingers/blobs/tags)

Source: Microsoft Pixelsense

Also, take a look at a similar conceptual implementation (i.e., IR-camera-based) by Johnny Lee (who in fact is now in the Microsoft team AFAIK): Tracking Fingers with the Wii Remote

2 added 176 characters in body
source | link

drawing

A step-by-step look at how PixelSense works:

  1. A contact (finger/blob/tag/object) is placed on the display
  2. IR back light unit provides light (though the optical sheets, LCD and protection glass) that hits the contact.
  3. Light reflected back from the contact is seen by the integrated sensors
  4. Sensors convert the light signal into an electrical signal/value
  5. Values reported from all of the sensors are used to create a picture of what is on the display
  6. The picture is analyzed using image processing techniques
  7. The output is sent to the PC. It includes the corrected sensor image and various contact types (fingers/blobs/tags)

Source: Microsoft Pixelsense

Also, take a look at Johnny Lee's similar conceptual implementation (i.e., IR-camera-based) in Tracking Fingers with the Wii Remote

drawing

A step-by-step look at how PixelSense works:

  1. A contact (finger/blob/tag/object) is placed on the display
  2. IR back light unit provides light (though the optical sheets, LCD and protection glass) that hits the contact.
  3. Light reflected back from the contact is seen by the integrated sensors
  4. Sensors convert the light signal into an electrical signal/value
  5. Values reported from all of the sensors are used to create a picture of what is on the display
  6. The picture is analyzed using image processing techniques
  7. The output is sent to the PC. It includes the corrected sensor image and various contact types (fingers/blobs/tags)

Source: Microsoft Pixelsense

drawing

A step-by-step look at how PixelSense works:

  1. A contact (finger/blob/tag/object) is placed on the display
  2. IR back light unit provides light (though the optical sheets, LCD and protection glass) that hits the contact.
  3. Light reflected back from the contact is seen by the integrated sensors
  4. Sensors convert the light signal into an electrical signal/value
  5. Values reported from all of the sensors are used to create a picture of what is on the display
  6. The picture is analyzed using image processing techniques
  7. The output is sent to the PC. It includes the corrected sensor image and various contact types (fingers/blobs/tags)

Source: Microsoft Pixelsense

Also, take a look at Johnny Lee's similar conceptual implementation (i.e., IR-camera-based) in Tracking Fingers with the Wii Remote

1
source | link

drawing

A step-by-step look at how PixelSense works:

  1. A contact (finger/blob/tag/object) is placed on the display
  2. IR back light unit provides light (though the optical sheets, LCD and protection glass) that hits the contact.
  3. Light reflected back from the contact is seen by the integrated sensors
  4. Sensors convert the light signal into an electrical signal/value
  5. Values reported from all of the sensors are used to create a picture of what is on the display
  6. The picture is analyzed using image processing techniques
  7. The output is sent to the PC. It includes the corrected sensor image and various contact types (fingers/blobs/tags)

Source: Microsoft Pixelsense