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The best way to clean it is replace it. That encoder has a de facto-standard design, and replacements are cheap and readily available (I've got a box with dozens of them, from multiple manufacturers). While it is possible to disassemble and clean one, doing that without first desoldering it from the board would be tricky and could easily result in accidental damage to the board. (Basically, you'd use needle-nose pliers to squeeze the two split-and-flared flanges shown in the photo, as well as the ones on the other side, then lift off the top half from the blue housing.)

If you're reasonably adept with a soldering iron and with a desoldering braid and/or solder sucker, you should be able to doreplace it yourself without too much difficulty, though an iron under 40 watts or so may have trouble desoldering the anchors on the side. Otherwise, any electronic repair shop can do it for you easily.

The best way to clean it is replace it. That encoder has a de facto-standard design, and replacements are cheap and readily available (I've got a box with dozens of them, from multiple manufacturers). While it is possible to disassemble and clean one, doing that without first desoldering it from the board would be tricky and could easily result in accidental damage to the board. (Basically, you'd use needle-nose pliers to squeeze the two split-and-flared flanges shown in the photo, as well as the ones on the other side, then lift off the top half from the blue housing.)

If you're reasonably adept with a soldering iron and with a desoldering braid and/or solder sucker, you should be able to do it yourself without too much difficulty, though an iron under 40 watts or so may have trouble desoldering the anchors on the side. Otherwise, any electronic repair shop can do it for you easily.

The best way to clean it is replace it. That encoder has a de facto-standard design, and replacements are cheap and readily available (I've got a box with dozens of them, from multiple manufacturers). While it is possible to disassemble and clean one, doing that without first desoldering it from the board would be tricky and could easily result in accidental damage to the board. (Basically, you'd use needle-nose pliers to squeeze the two split-and-flared flanges shown in the photo, as well as the ones on the other side, then lift off the top half from the blue housing.)

If you're reasonably adept with a soldering iron and with a desoldering braid and/or solder sucker, you should be able to replace it yourself without too much difficulty, though an iron under 40 watts or so may have trouble desoldering the anchors on the side. Otherwise, any electronic repair shop can do it for you easily.

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The best way to clean it is replace it. That encoder has a de facto-standard design, and replacements are cheap and readily available (I've got a box with dozens of them, from multiple manufacturers). While it is possible to disassemble and clean one, doing that without first desoldering it from the board would be tricky and could easily result in accidental damage to the board. (Basically, you'd use needle-nose pliers to squeeze the two split-and-flared anchorsflanges shown in the photo, as well as the ones on the other side, then lift off the top half from the blue housing.)

If you're reasonably adept with a soldering iron and with a desoldering braid and/or solder sucker, you should be able to do it yourself without too much difficulty, though an iron under 40 watts or so may have trouble desoldering the anchors on the side. Otherwise, any electronic repair shop can do it for you easily.

The best way to clean it is replace it. That encoder has a de facto-standard design, and replacements are cheap and readily available (I've got a box with dozens of them, from multiple manufacturers). While it is possible to disassemble and clean one, doing that without first desoldering it from the board would be tricky and could easily result in accidental damage to the board. (Basically, you'd use needle-nose pliers to squeeze the two split-and-flared anchors shown in the photo, as well as the ones on the other side, then lift off the top half from the blue housing.)

If you're reasonably adept with a soldering iron and with a desoldering braid and/or solder sucker, you should be able to do it yourself without too much difficulty, though an iron under 40 watts or so may have trouble desoldering the anchors on the side. Otherwise, any electronic repair shop can do it for you easily.

The best way to clean it is replace it. That encoder has a de facto-standard design, and replacements are cheap and readily available (I've got a box with dozens of them, from multiple manufacturers). While it is possible to disassemble and clean one, doing that without first desoldering it from the board would be tricky and could easily result in accidental damage to the board. (Basically, you'd use needle-nose pliers to squeeze the two split-and-flared flanges shown in the photo, as well as the ones on the other side, then lift off the top half from the blue housing.)

If you're reasonably adept with a soldering iron and with a desoldering braid and/or solder sucker, you should be able to do it yourself without too much difficulty, though an iron under 40 watts or so may have trouble desoldering the anchors on the side. Otherwise, any electronic repair shop can do it for you easily.

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The best way to clean it is replace it. That encoder has a de facto-standard design, and replacements are cheap and readily available (I've got a box with dozens of them, from multiple manufacturers). While it is possible to disassemble and clean one, doing that without first desoldering it from the board would be tricky and could easily result in accidental damage to the board. (Basically, you'd use needle-nose pliers to squeeze the two split-and-flared anchors shown in the photo, as well as the ones on the other side, then lift off the top half from the blue housing.)

If you're reasonably adept with a soldering iron and with a desoldering braid and/or solder sucker, you should be able to do it yourself without too much difficulty, though an iron under 40 watts or so may have trouble desoldering the anchors on the side. Otherwise, any electronic repair shop can do it for you easily.