it's
Source Link
Neil_UK
  • 134.2k
  • 3
  • 152
  • 330

If I look at a signal in it'sits frequency domain, are there some guidelines by which I can tell how that signal looks in the time domain?

I was studying the Laplace transform and the Fourier transform, and I can't figure out if there is some intuitive way of finding out how a signal looks in the time domain if we know it'sits frequency domain. For example, are there some rules like:

If there is a frequency whose amplitude is approaching infinity then.... (like when there are poles on the imaginary axis in the s plane, like this: enter image description here

If the frequency graph is decaying towards 0 then....

Because from what I'm reading about the Laplace transform, the position of poles and zeros gives me a better understanding of how the frequency response looks like, but what do I care what it looks like if I don't know what the time domain will look like?

If I look at a signal in it's frequency domain, are there some guidelines by which I can tell how that signal looks in the time domain?

I was studying the Laplace transform and the Fourier transform, and I can't figure out if there is some intuitive way of finding out how a signal looks in the time domain if we know it's frequency domain. For example, are there some rules like:

If there is a frequency whose amplitude is approaching infinity then.... (like when there are poles on the imaginary axis in the s plane, like this: enter image description here

If the frequency graph is decaying towards 0 then....

Because from what I'm reading about the Laplace transform, the position of poles and zeros gives me a better understanding of how the frequency response looks like, but what do I care what it looks like if I don't know what the time domain will look like?

If I look at a signal in its frequency domain, are there some guidelines by which I can tell how that signal looks in the time domain?

I was studying the Laplace transform and the Fourier transform, and I can't figure out if there is some intuitive way of finding out how a signal looks in the time domain if we know its frequency domain. For example, are there some rules like:

If there is a frequency whose amplitude is approaching infinity then.... (like when there are poles on the imaginary axis in the s plane, like this: enter image description here

If the frequency graph is decaying towards 0 then....

Because from what I'm reading about the Laplace transform, the position of poles and zeros gives me a better understanding of how the frequency response looks like, but what do I care what it looks like if I don't know what the time domain will look like?

Source Link

If I look at a signal in it's frequency domain, are there some guidelines by which I can tell how that signal looks in the time domain?

I was studying the Laplace transform and the Fourier transform, and I can't figure out if there is some intuitive way of finding out how a signal looks in the time domain if we know it's frequency domain. For example, are there some rules like:

If there is a frequency whose amplitude is approaching infinity then.... (like when there are poles on the imaginary axis in the s plane, like this: enter image description here

If the frequency graph is decaying towards 0 then....

Because from what I'm reading about the Laplace transform, the position of poles and zeros gives me a better understanding of how the frequency response looks like, but what do I care what it looks like if I don't know what the time domain will look like?