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In general, NO. The current without a resistor (or other current limiting) is 'out of control', and some PWM-ed fraction of that'out of control' is still 'out of control'.

Side note: the peak current allowed for normal LEDs is often only a little above the rated current (for instance 30 mA versus 20 mA), so even when you do PWM with a controlled current do check the LED datasheet, both for the allowed average currrent and for the allowed maximum (peak) current.

And DO NOT use the absolute maxima section! The only section for normal operation is het 'normal operating conditions' section or something similarly named.

In general, NO. The current without a resistor (or other current limiting) is 'out of control', and some fraction of that is still 'out of control'.

Side note: the peak current allowed for normal LEDs is often only a little above the rated current (for instance 30 mA versus 20 mA), so even when you PWM with a controlled current do check the LED datasheet.

In general, NO. The current without a resistor (or other current limiting) is 'out of control', and some PWM-ed fraction of 'out of control' is still 'out of control'.

Side note: the peak current allowed for normal LEDs is often only a little above the rated current (for instance 30 mA versus 20 mA), so even when you do PWM with a controlled current do check the LED datasheet, both for the allowed average currrent and for the allowed maximum (peak) current.

And DO NOT use the absolute maxima section! The only section for normal operation is het 'normal operating conditions' section or something similarly named.

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In general, NO. The current without a resistor (or other current limiting) is 'out of control', and some fraction of that is still 'out of control'.

Side note: the peak current allowed for normal LEDs is often only a little above the rated current (for instance 30 mA versus 20 mA), so even when you PWM with a controlled current do check the LED datasheet.