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The method that I have used in the past is to use a reference microphone with a known frequency response, and also a calibrated sound source, e.g. 96dB SPL at 1 kHz.

First you calibrate the reference microphone, analogue electronics, environment, etc, using the calibrated sound source, then you can take absolute dB SPL measurements at any frequency using this one calibration datum and the frequency response curves for the reference microphone.

Note that this method assumes you want to measure absolute sensitivity across frequency, i.e. what voltage you get for a given SPL at a given frequency. If you just want the overall shape of the frequency response, i.e. relative to some arbitrary point (e.g. output level relative to output at 1 kHz) then you don't need the calibrated sound source - you can just use a reference microphone.

The method that I have used in the past is to use a reference microphone with a known frequency response, and also a calibrated sound source, e.g. 96dB SPL at 1 kHz.

The method that I have used in the past is to use a reference microphone with a known frequency response, and also a calibrated sound source, e.g. 96dB SPL at 1 kHz.

First you calibrate the reference microphone, analogue electronics, environment, etc, using the calibrated sound source, then you can take absolute dB SPL measurements at any frequency using this one calibration datum and the frequency response curves for the reference microphone.

Note that this method assumes you want to measure absolute sensitivity across frequency, i.e. what voltage you get for a given SPL at a given frequency. If you just want the overall shape of the frequency response, i.e. relative to some arbitrary point (e.g. output level relative to output at 1 kHz) then you don't need the calibrated sound source - you can just use a reference microphone.

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The method that I have used in the past is to use a reference microphone with a known frequency response, and also a calibrated sound source, e.g. 96dB SPL at 1 kHz.