3 edited body
source | link

When dealing with unknown connectors, please follow these steps to aid your search:

  1. Measure the "pitch" or distance between connector pins
  2. Count the number of connector pins
  3. Count the number or rows of pins
  4. Measure the pin length/depth
  5. Determine the gender of the connector (male/female... should be obvious ;-) )
  6. Measure the overall dimensions (that's the dimension of the smallest box that can contain the entire thing)
  7. Determine what type of connector it is by function (see next list)
  8. Finally, look for clues for the manufacturer (brand, logo, letter/part number marks, etc.)

Here are the usual types of connectors by functions (lifted from TE's Connector Picture Search which is highly recommended):

  • PCB connectors
  • I/O connectors
  • Power connectors
  • Terminal blocks/strips
  • Terminals/splices
  • RF or Coax connectors
  • Ribbon or Flat Flex Wire
  • Fiber optics
  • Sockets (chip, processor, memory)

Now based on the eighth steps, here's what I can figure out from the information you had provided so far:

  1. -- no guess --
  2. 40 pins
  3. 2 rows (2 x 20 pins)
  4. -- no guess --
  5. you have both the male and female samples
  6. -- no guess --
  7. board-to-board stacked
  8. related to the ThinkPad series of docking stations

Your laptop's datasheet, aka service manual, was released in 2005 so that makes the probable manufacturing year(s) to be around a year or two before that. The connector therefore must have existed in the market during those times +/- 3 years prior or after; somewhere between 2000-2008. Some hints I found (Google) pointed me to this connector datasheet by Japan Aviation Electronics (JAE) which was released (or updated) in 2007 and matches currently known specs of your connector. Please verify further if it indeed is the connector you are seeking by measuring the missing dimensions and comparing it against the datasheet.


EDIT:

From the new dimension data you have provided, the connectors you're looking for is still manufactured by JAE with part numbers AA01AA01A-AS040VA1S040VA1 for the female/socket and AA01AA01A-AP040VA1P040VA1 for the male/plug. Check out the datasheet here.

When dealing with unknown connectors, please follow these steps to aid your search:

  1. Measure the "pitch" or distance between connector pins
  2. Count the number of connector pins
  3. Count the number or rows of pins
  4. Measure the pin length/depth
  5. Determine the gender of the connector (male/female... should be obvious ;-) )
  6. Measure the overall dimensions (that's the dimension of the smallest box that can contain the entire thing)
  7. Determine what type of connector it is by function (see next list)
  8. Finally, look for clues for the manufacturer (brand, logo, letter/part number marks, etc.)

Here are the usual types of connectors by functions (lifted from TE's Connector Picture Search which is highly recommended):

  • PCB connectors
  • I/O connectors
  • Power connectors
  • Terminal blocks/strips
  • Terminals/splices
  • RF or Coax connectors
  • Ribbon or Flat Flex Wire
  • Fiber optics
  • Sockets (chip, processor, memory)

Now based on the eighth steps, here's what I can figure out from the information you had provided so far:

  1. -- no guess --
  2. 40 pins
  3. 2 rows (2 x 20 pins)
  4. -- no guess --
  5. you have both the male and female samples
  6. -- no guess --
  7. board-to-board stacked
  8. related to the ThinkPad series of docking stations

Your laptop's datasheet, aka service manual, was released in 2005 so that makes the probable manufacturing year(s) to be around a year or two before that. The connector therefore must have existed in the market during those times +/- 3 years prior or after; somewhere between 2000-2008. Some hints I found (Google) pointed me to this connector datasheet by Japan Aviation Electronics (JAE) which was released (or updated) in 2007 and matches currently known specs of your connector. Please verify further if it indeed is the connector you are seeking by measuring the missing dimensions and comparing it against the datasheet.


EDIT:

From the new dimension data you have provided, the connectors you're looking for is still manufactured by JAE with part numbers AA01-AS040VA1 for the female/socket and AA01-AP040VA1 for the male/plug. Check out the datasheet here.

When dealing with unknown connectors, please follow these steps to aid your search:

  1. Measure the "pitch" or distance between connector pins
  2. Count the number of connector pins
  3. Count the number or rows of pins
  4. Measure the pin length/depth
  5. Determine the gender of the connector (male/female... should be obvious ;-) )
  6. Measure the overall dimensions (that's the dimension of the smallest box that can contain the entire thing)
  7. Determine what type of connector it is by function (see next list)
  8. Finally, look for clues for the manufacturer (brand, logo, letter/part number marks, etc.)

Here are the usual types of connectors by functions (lifted from TE's Connector Picture Search which is highly recommended):

  • PCB connectors
  • I/O connectors
  • Power connectors
  • Terminal blocks/strips
  • Terminals/splices
  • RF or Coax connectors
  • Ribbon or Flat Flex Wire
  • Fiber optics
  • Sockets (chip, processor, memory)

Now based on the eighth steps, here's what I can figure out from the information you had provided so far:

  1. -- no guess --
  2. 40 pins
  3. 2 rows (2 x 20 pins)
  4. -- no guess --
  5. you have both the male and female samples
  6. -- no guess --
  7. board-to-board stacked
  8. related to the ThinkPad series of docking stations

Your laptop's datasheet, aka service manual, was released in 2005 so that makes the probable manufacturing year(s) to be around a year or two before that. The connector therefore must have existed in the market during those times +/- 3 years prior or after; somewhere between 2000-2008. Some hints I found (Google) pointed me to this connector datasheet by Japan Aviation Electronics (JAE) which was released (or updated) in 2007 and matches currently known specs of your connector. Please verify further if it indeed is the connector you are seeking by measuring the missing dimensions and comparing it against the datasheet.


EDIT:

From the new dimension data you have provided, the connectors you're looking for is still manufactured by JAE with part numbers AA01A-S040VA1 for the female/socket and AA01A-P040VA1 for the male/plug. Check out the datasheet here.

2 added 268 characters in body
source | link

When dealing with unknown connectors, please follow these steps to aid your search:

  1. Measure the "pitch" or distance between connector pins
  2. Count the number of connector pins
  3. Count the number or rows of pins
  4. Measure the pin length/depth
  5. Determine the gender of the connector (male/female... should be obvious ;-) )
  6. Measure the overall dimensions (that's the dimension of the smallest box that can contain the entire thing)
  7. Determine what type of connector it is by function (see next list)
  8. Finally, look for clues for the manufacturer (brand, logo, letter/part number marks, etc.)

Here are the usual types of connectors by functions (lifted from TE's Connector Picture Search which is highly recommended):

  • PCB connectors
  • I/O connectors
  • Power connectors
  • Terminal blocks/strips
  • Terminals/splices
  • RF or Coax connectors
  • Ribbon or Flat Flex Wire
  • Fiber optics
  • Sockets (chip, processor, memory)

Now based on the eighth steps, here's what I can figure out from the information you had provided so far:

  1. -- no guess --
  2. 40 pins
  3. 2 rows (2 x 20 pins)
  4. -- no guess --
  5. you have both the male and female samples
  6. -- no guess --
  7. board-to-board stacked
  8. related to the ThinkPad series of docking stations

Your laptop's datasheet, aka service manual, was released in 2005 so that makes the probable manufacturing year(s) to be around a year or two before that. The connector therefore must have existed in the market during those times +/- 3 years prior or after; somewhere between 2000-2008. Some hints I found (Google) pointed me to this connector datasheet by Japan Aviation Electronics (JAE) which was released (or updated) in 2007 and matches currently known specs of your connector. Please verify further if it indeed is the connector you are seeking by measuring the missing dimensions and comparing it against the datasheet.


EDIT:

From the new dimension data you have provided, the connectors you're looking for is still manufactured by JAE with part numbers AA01-AS040VA1 for the female/socket and AA01-AP040VA1 for the male/plug. Check out the datasheet here.

When dealing with unknown connectors, please follow these steps to aid your search:

  1. Measure the "pitch" or distance between connector pins
  2. Count the number of connector pins
  3. Count the number or rows of pins
  4. Measure the pin length/depth
  5. Determine the gender of the connector (male/female... should be obvious ;-) )
  6. Measure the overall dimensions (that's the dimension of the smallest box that can contain the entire thing)
  7. Determine what type of connector it is by function (see next list)
  8. Finally, look for clues for the manufacturer (brand, logo, letter/part number marks, etc.)

Here are the usual types of connectors by functions (lifted from TE's Connector Picture Search which is highly recommended):

  • PCB connectors
  • I/O connectors
  • Power connectors
  • Terminal blocks/strips
  • Terminals/splices
  • RF or Coax connectors
  • Ribbon or Flat Flex Wire
  • Fiber optics
  • Sockets (chip, processor, memory)

Now based on the eighth steps, here's what I can figure out from the information you had provided so far:

  1. -- no guess --
  2. 40 pins
  3. 2 rows (2 x 20 pins)
  4. -- no guess --
  5. you have both the male and female samples
  6. -- no guess --
  7. board-to-board stacked
  8. related to the ThinkPad series of docking stations

Your laptop's datasheet, aka service manual, was released in 2005 so that makes the probable manufacturing year(s) to be around a year or two before that. The connector therefore must have existed in the market during those times +/- 3 years prior or after; somewhere between 2000-2008. Some hints I found (Google) pointed me to this connector datasheet by Japan Aviation Electronics (JAE) which was released (or updated) in 2007 and matches currently known specs of your connector. Please verify further if it indeed is the connector you are seeking by measuring the missing dimensions and comparing it against the datasheet.

When dealing with unknown connectors, please follow these steps to aid your search:

  1. Measure the "pitch" or distance between connector pins
  2. Count the number of connector pins
  3. Count the number or rows of pins
  4. Measure the pin length/depth
  5. Determine the gender of the connector (male/female... should be obvious ;-) )
  6. Measure the overall dimensions (that's the dimension of the smallest box that can contain the entire thing)
  7. Determine what type of connector it is by function (see next list)
  8. Finally, look for clues for the manufacturer (brand, logo, letter/part number marks, etc.)

Here are the usual types of connectors by functions (lifted from TE's Connector Picture Search which is highly recommended):

  • PCB connectors
  • I/O connectors
  • Power connectors
  • Terminal blocks/strips
  • Terminals/splices
  • RF or Coax connectors
  • Ribbon or Flat Flex Wire
  • Fiber optics
  • Sockets (chip, processor, memory)

Now based on the eighth steps, here's what I can figure out from the information you had provided so far:

  1. -- no guess --
  2. 40 pins
  3. 2 rows (2 x 20 pins)
  4. -- no guess --
  5. you have both the male and female samples
  6. -- no guess --
  7. board-to-board stacked
  8. related to the ThinkPad series of docking stations

Your laptop's datasheet, aka service manual, was released in 2005 so that makes the probable manufacturing year(s) to be around a year or two before that. The connector therefore must have existed in the market during those times +/- 3 years prior or after; somewhere between 2000-2008. Some hints I found (Google) pointed me to this connector datasheet by Japan Aviation Electronics (JAE) which was released (or updated) in 2007 and matches currently known specs of your connector. Please verify further if it indeed is the connector you are seeking by measuring the missing dimensions and comparing it against the datasheet.


EDIT:

From the new dimension data you have provided, the connectors you're looking for is still manufactured by JAE with part numbers AA01-AS040VA1 for the female/socket and AA01-AP040VA1 for the male/plug. Check out the datasheet here.

1
source | link

When dealing with unknown connectors, please follow these steps to aid your search:

  1. Measure the "pitch" or distance between connector pins
  2. Count the number of connector pins
  3. Count the number or rows of pins
  4. Measure the pin length/depth
  5. Determine the gender of the connector (male/female... should be obvious ;-) )
  6. Measure the overall dimensions (that's the dimension of the smallest box that can contain the entire thing)
  7. Determine what type of connector it is by function (see next list)
  8. Finally, look for clues for the manufacturer (brand, logo, letter/part number marks, etc.)

Here are the usual types of connectors by functions (lifted from TE's Connector Picture Search which is highly recommended):

  • PCB connectors
  • I/O connectors
  • Power connectors
  • Terminal blocks/strips
  • Terminals/splices
  • RF or Coax connectors
  • Ribbon or Flat Flex Wire
  • Fiber optics
  • Sockets (chip, processor, memory)

Now based on the eighth steps, here's what I can figure out from the information you had provided so far:

  1. -- no guess --
  2. 40 pins
  3. 2 rows (2 x 20 pins)
  4. -- no guess --
  5. you have both the male and female samples
  6. -- no guess --
  7. board-to-board stacked
  8. related to the ThinkPad series of docking stations

Your laptop's datasheet, aka service manual, was released in 2005 so that makes the probable manufacturing year(s) to be around a year or two before that. The connector therefore must have existed in the market during those times +/- 3 years prior or after; somewhere between 2000-2008. Some hints I found (Google) pointed me to this connector datasheet by Japan Aviation Electronics (JAE) which was released (or updated) in 2007 and matches currently known specs of your connector. Please verify further if it indeed is the connector you are seeking by measuring the missing dimensions and comparing it against the datasheet.