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I have two DC motors with no-load current draw of 200mA. The datasheet goes on include a stall-current draw of 2.2A.

The torque is given for both extremes. Considering you know the torque that is being exerted (and presumably that is the force required to be exerted to stop the motor from turning) is this relationship linear?

I am concerned because I will obviously load the motors when using them but am not sure how to calculate the estimated current draw under arbitrary load. Do you simply throw the contraption together and measure the current being drawn by the motors and when you see that value approaching the stall current then its obvious you are overloading your motor?


Actually, it is linear. I found this online just now. But I am still concerned with the second part of my question regarding calculating loaded current draw. From the graph below its obvious you can determine current by a given torque load - but how do you calculate that? Or what other methods are known?

enter image description here

I have two DC motors with no-load current draw of 200mA. The datasheet goes on include a stall-current draw of 2.2A.

The torque is given for both extremes. Considering you know the torque that is being exerted (and presumably that is the force required to be exerted to stop the motor from turning) is this relationship linear?

I am concerned because I will obviously load the motors when using them but am not sure how to calculate the estimated current draw under arbitrary load. Do you simply throw the contraption together and measure the current being drawn by the motors and when you see that value approaching the stall current then its obvious you are overloading your motor?

I have two DC motors with no-load current draw of 200mA. The datasheet goes on include a stall-current draw of 2.2A.

The torque is given for both extremes. Considering you know the torque that is being exerted (and presumably that is the force required to be exerted to stop the motor from turning) is this relationship linear?

I am concerned because I will obviously load the motors when using them but am not sure how to calculate the estimated current draw under arbitrary load. Do you simply throw the contraption together and measure the current being drawn by the motors and when you see that value approaching the stall current then its obvious you are overloading your motor?


Actually, it is linear. I found this online just now. But I am still concerned with the second part of my question regarding calculating loaded current draw. From the graph below its obvious you can determine current by a given torque load - but how do you calculate that? Or what other methods are known?

enter image description here

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Is no-load to stall amp draw linear with DC motors?

I have two DC motors with no-load current draw of 200mA. The datasheet goes on include a stall-current draw of 2.2A.

The torque is given for both extremes. Considering you know the torque that is being exerted (and presumably that is the force required to be exerted to stop the motor from turning) is this relationship linear?

I am concerned because I will obviously load the motors when using them but am not sure how to calculate the estimated current draw under arbitrary load. Do you simply throw the contraption together and measure the current being drawn by the motors and when you see that value approaching the stall current then its obvious you are overloading your motor?