5 typo it's
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Your gap is too wide. Make it very, very very narrow. And rolled into a cylinder. Like a real capacitor.

Yes, +q could be less than -q, but only if the attraction/repulsion effects of electrons in the connecting wires were nearly as large as the attraction/repulsion down between the capacitor plates. (In that case the plates wouldn't be a near-perfect electrical shield for the fields produced by the wires.) But with real-world capacitors, this doesn't happen, and instead the field between the plate is totally enormous compared to the tiny fields produced by electrons in the wires. If +q only differs from -q by a millionth of a percent, we ignore it. See Engineer's capacitor vs. Physicist's capacitor, a split metal ball, versus two separate balls.

For capacitors used in circuitry, if we dump some charge on one capacitor terminal, exactly half of it will seemingly migrate to the other terminal. Weird. But for "physicist-style capacitors" with small, wide-spaced plates are different, and an extra electron on the wire will make +q not equal to -q.

In detail: if the capacitance across the plates is 10,000pF, and the capacitance to Earth of each wire and plate is 0.01 pF, then the opposite plateplate's charges will ignore any small +q and/or -q on the connecting wires. The attraction/repulsion of electrons in the wires doesn't significantly alter the enormous +q and -q on the inner side of the capacitor plates.

Engineers use real-world components: wide capacitor plates with very narrow gaps; gaps the thickness of insulating film. But if you were a physicist, your capacitors might be metal spheres with large gaps between, or metal disks where the space between the plates was large when compared to their diameter. (Or you'd draw a capacitor symbol where the gap between plates was enormous and easy to see.) In this case the attraction/repulsion of electrons on the connecting wires would have an effect on the balance of +q -q between capacitor plates.

PS

WeirdAnother weird concept: make a solid stack of thousands of disc capacitors: foil disk, dielectric disk, foil disk, etc. Use half-inch wide disks, and stack them up into a narrow foot-long rod. Now connect one end to 1,000 volts. The same kilovolt will appear on the other end! The rod is acting like a conductor. Yet it'sits DC resistance is just about infinite. Series capacitors! Each little capacitor induces charge on the next and the next, all the way to the end.

Your gap is too wide. Make it very, very very narrow. And rolled into a cylinder. Like a real capacitor.

Yes, +q could be less than -q, but only if the attraction/repulsion effects of electrons in the connecting wires were nearly as large as the attraction/repulsion down between the capacitor plates. (In that case the plates wouldn't be a near-perfect electrical shield for the fields produced by the wires.) But with real-world capacitors, this doesn't happen, and instead the field between the plate is totally enormous compared to the tiny fields produced by electrons in the wires. If +q only differs from -q by a millionth of a percent, we ignore it. See Engineer's capacitor vs. Physicist's capacitor, a split metal ball, versus two separate balls.

For capacitors used in circuitry, if we dump some charge on one capacitor terminal, exactly half of it will seemingly migrate to the other terminal. Weird. But for "physicist-style capacitors" with small, wide-spaced plates, an extra electron on the wire will make +q not equal -q.

In detail: if the capacitance across the plates is 10,000pF, and the capacitance to Earth of each wire and plate is 0.01 pF, then the opposite plate charges will ignore any small +q and/or -q on the wires. The attraction/repulsion of electrons in the wires doesn't significantly alter the enormous +q and -q on the inner side of the capacitor plates.

Engineers use real-world components: wide capacitor plates with narrow gaps; gaps the thickness of insulating film. But if you were a physicist, your capacitors might be metal spheres with large gaps between, or metal disks where the space between the plates was large when compared to their diameter. (Or you'd draw a capacitor symbol where the gap between plates was enormous and easy to see.) In this case the attraction/repulsion of electrons on the connecting wires would have an effect on the balance of +q -q between capacitor plates.

PS

Weird concept: make a solid stack of thousands of disc capacitors: foil disk, dielectric disk, foil disk, etc. Use half-inch wide disks, and stack them up into a narrow foot-long rod. Now connect one end to 1,000 volts. The same kilovolt will appear on the other end! The rod is acting like a conductor. Yet it's DC resistance is just about infinite. Each little capacitor induces charge on the next and the next, all the way to the end.

Your gap is too wide. Make it very, very very narrow. And rolled into a cylinder. Like a real capacitor.

Yes, +q could be less than -q, but only if the attraction/repulsion effects of electrons in the connecting wires were nearly as large as the attraction/repulsion down between the capacitor plates. (In that case the plates wouldn't be a near-perfect electrical shield for the fields produced by the wires.) But with real-world capacitors, this doesn't happen, and instead the field between the plate is totally enormous compared to the tiny fields produced by electrons in the wires. If +q only differs from -q by a millionth of a percent, we ignore it. See Engineer's capacitor vs. Physicist's capacitor, a split metal ball, versus two separate balls.

For capacitors used in circuitry, if we dump some charge on one capacitor terminal, exactly half of it will seemingly migrate to the other terminal. Weird. But "physicist-style capacitors" with small, wide-spaced plates are different, and an extra electron on the wire will make +q not equal to -q.

In detail: if the capacitance across the plates is 10,000pF, and the capacitance to Earth of each wire and plate is 0.01 pF, then the opposite plate's charges will ignore any small +q and/or -q on the connecting wires. The attraction/repulsion of electrons in the wires doesn't significantly alter the enormous +q and -q on the inner side of the capacitor plates.

Engineers use real-world components: wide capacitor plates with very narrow gaps; gaps the thickness of insulating film. But if you were a physicist, your capacitors might be metal spheres with large gaps between, or metal disks where the space between the plates was large when compared to their diameter. (Or you'd draw a capacitor symbol where the gap between plates was enormous and easy to see.) In this case the attraction/repulsion of electrons on the connecting wires would have an effect on the balance of +q -q between capacitor plates.

PS

Another weird concept: make a solid stack of thousands of disc capacitors: foil disk, dielectric disk, foil disk, etc. Use half-inch wide disks, and stack them up into a narrow foot-long rod. Now connect one end to 1,000 volts. The same kilovolt will appear on the other end! The rod is acting like a conductor. Yet its DC resistance is just about infinite. Series capacitors! Each little capacitor induces charge on the next and the next, all the way to the end.

    Bounty Ended with 50 reputation awarded by dfg
4 PS capacitor-stack as conductor
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Your gap is too wide. Make it very, very very narrow. And rolled into a cylinder. Like a real capacitor.

Yes, it+q could be less than q-q, but only if the attraction/repulsion effects of electrons in the connecting wires were nearly as large as the effectsattraction/repulsion down between the capacitor plates. (ThenIn that case the plates wouldn't be a near-perfect electrical shield for the fields produced by the wires.) But inwith real-world capacitors, this doesn't happen, and instead the field between the plate is totally enormous compared to the tiny fields atproduced by electrons in the wires. If +q only differs from -q by a millionth of a percent, we ignore it. See Engineer's capacitor vs. Physicist's capacitor, a split metal ball, versus two separate balls.

For capacitors used in circuitry, if we dump some charge on one capacitor terminal, exactly half of it will seemingly migrate to the other terminal. Weird. But for capacitors"physicist-style capacitors" with small, wide-spaced plates, an extra electron on the wire will make +q not equal -q.

In detail: if the capacitance across the plates is 10,000pF, and the capacitance to Earth of each wire and plate is 0.01 pF, then the opposite plate charges will ignore any small +q and/or -q on the wires. The attraction/repulsion of electrons in the wires doesn't significantly alter the enormous +q and -q on the inner side of the capacitor plates.

Engineers use real-world components: wide capacitor plates with narrow gaps; gaps the thickness of insulating film. But if you were a physicist, your capacitors might be metal spheres with large gaps between, or metal disks where the space between the plates was large when compared to their diameter. (Or you'd draw a capacitor symbol where the gap between plates was enormous and easy to see.) In this case the attraction/repulsion of electrons on the connecting wires would have an effect on the balance of +q -q between capacitor plates.

PS

Weird concept: make a solid stack of thousands of disc capacitors: foil disk, dielectric disk, foil disk, etc. Use half-inch wide disks, and stack them up into a narrow foot-long rod. Now connect one end to 1,000 volts. The same kilovolt will appear on the other end! The rod is acting like a conductor. Yet it's DC resistance is just about infinite. Each little capacitor induces charge on the next and the next, all the way to the end.

Your gap is too wide.

Yes, it could be less than q, but only if the attraction/repulsion effects of the connecting wires were nearly as large as the effects between the capacitor plates. (Then the plates wouldn't be a near-perfect electrical shield for the fields produced by the wires.) But in real-world capacitors this doesn't happen, and instead the field between the plate is enormous compared to the fields at the wires. See Engineer's capacitor vs. Physicist's capacitor, a split metal ball, versus two separate balls.

For capacitors used in circuitry, if we dump some charge on one capacitor terminal, exactly half of it will seemingly migrate to the other terminal. Weird. But for capacitors with small, wide-spaced plates, an extra electron on the wire will make +q not equal -q.

In detail: if the capacitance across the plates is 10,000pF, and the capacitance to Earth of each wire and plate is 0.01 pF, then the opposite plate charges will ignore any small +q and/or -q on the wires. The attraction/repulsion of electrons in the wires doesn't significantly alter the enormous +q and -q on the inner side of the capacitor plates.

Engineers use real-world components: wide capacitor plates with narrow gaps; gaps the thickness of insulating film. But if you were a physicist, your capacitors might be metal spheres with large gaps between, or metal disks where the space between the plates was large when compared to their diameter. (Or you'd draw a capacitor symbol where the gap between plates was enormous and easy to see.) In this case the attraction/repulsion of electrons on the connecting wires would have an effect on the balance of +q -q between capacitor plates.

Your gap is too wide. Make it very, very very narrow. And rolled into a cylinder. Like a real capacitor.

Yes, +q could be less than -q, but only if the attraction/repulsion effects of electrons in the connecting wires were nearly as large as the attraction/repulsion down between the capacitor plates. (In that case the plates wouldn't be a near-perfect electrical shield for the fields produced by the wires.) But with real-world capacitors, this doesn't happen, and instead the field between the plate is totally enormous compared to the tiny fields produced by electrons in the wires. If +q only differs from -q by a millionth of a percent, we ignore it. See Engineer's capacitor vs. Physicist's capacitor, a split metal ball, versus two separate balls.

For capacitors used in circuitry, if we dump some charge on one capacitor terminal, exactly half of it will seemingly migrate to the other terminal. Weird. But for "physicist-style capacitors" with small, wide-spaced plates, an extra electron on the wire will make +q not equal -q.

In detail: if the capacitance across the plates is 10,000pF, and the capacitance to Earth of each wire and plate is 0.01 pF, then the opposite plate charges will ignore any small +q and/or -q on the wires. The attraction/repulsion of electrons in the wires doesn't significantly alter the enormous +q and -q on the inner side of the capacitor plates.

Engineers use real-world components: wide capacitor plates with narrow gaps; gaps the thickness of insulating film. But if you were a physicist, your capacitors might be metal spheres with large gaps between, or metal disks where the space between the plates was large when compared to their diameter. (Or you'd draw a capacitor symbol where the gap between plates was enormous and easy to see.) In this case the attraction/repulsion of electrons on the connecting wires would have an effect on the balance of +q -q between capacitor plates.

PS

Weird concept: make a solid stack of thousands of disc capacitors: foil disk, dielectric disk, foil disk, etc. Use half-inch wide disks, and stack them up into a narrow foot-long rod. Now connect one end to 1,000 volts. The same kilovolt will appear on the other end! The rod is acting like a conductor. Yet it's DC resistance is just about infinite. Each little capacitor induces charge on the next and the next, all the way to the end.

3 fix sentence structure
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Your gap is too wide.

Yes, it could be less than q, but only if the attraction/repulsion effects of the connecting wires were nearly as large as the effects ofbetween the capacitor plates. (The close-spacedThen the plates wouldn't be a near-perfect electrical shield for the fields produced by the wires.) But in most real-world capacitors this doesn't happen, and instead the field between the plate is enormous compared to the fields at the wires. See Engineer's capacitor vs. Physicist's capacitor, a split metal ball, versus two separate balls. For

For capacitors used in circuitry, if we dump some charge on one capacitor terminal, exactly half of it will seemingly migrate to the other terminal. Weird. But for capacitors with small, wide-spaced plates, an extra electron on the wire will make +q not equal -q.

In detail: if the capacitance across the plates is 10,000pF, and the capacitance to Earth of the wires themselveseach wire and plate is 0.01 pF, then we can usually ignore the opposite plate charges will ignore any small +q and/or -q on the wires. The attraction/repulsion of electrons in the wires doesn't significantly alter the enormous +q and -q on the inner side of the capacitor plates.

Engineers use real-world components: wide capacitorscapacitor plates with narrow gaps; gaps the thickness of insulating film. But if you were a physicist, your capacitors might be metal spheres with large gaps between, or metal disks where the space between the plates was large when compared to the width of the diskstheir diameter. (Or you'd draw a capacitor symbol where the gap between plates wasn't invisibly smallwas enormous and easy to see.) In this case the attraction/repulsion of electrons on the connecting wires would have an effect on the balance of +q -q between capacitor plates.

Yes, it could be less than q, but only if the attraction/repulsion effects of the connecting wires were nearly as large as the effects of the capacitor plates. (The close-spaced plates wouldn't be a near-perfect electrical shield for the fields produced by the wires.) But in most real capacitors this doesn't happen. See Engineer's capacitor vs. Physicist's capacitor. For capacitors used in circuitry, if we dump some charge on one capacitor terminal, exactly half of it will seemingly migrate to the other terminal. Weird.

In detail: if the capacitance across the plates is 10,000pF, and the capacitance to Earth of the wires themselves is 0.01 pF, then we can usually ignore the small +q and -q on the wires. The attraction/repulsion of electrons in the wires doesn't significantly alter the enormous +q and -q on the inner side of the capacitor plates.

Engineers use wide capacitors with narrow gaps the thickness of insulating film. But if you were a physicist, your capacitors might be spheres with large gaps between, or metal disks where the space between the plates was large when compared to the width of the disks. (Or you'd draw a capacitor symbol where the gap between plates wasn't invisibly small.) In this case the attraction/repulsion of electrons on the connecting wires would have an effect on the balance of +q -q between capacitor plates.

Your gap is too wide.

Yes, it could be less than q, but only if the attraction/repulsion effects of the connecting wires were nearly as large as the effects between the capacitor plates. (Then the plates wouldn't be a near-perfect electrical shield for the fields produced by the wires.) But in real-world capacitors this doesn't happen, and instead the field between the plate is enormous compared to the fields at the wires. See Engineer's capacitor vs. Physicist's capacitor, a split metal ball, versus two separate balls.

For capacitors used in circuitry, if we dump some charge on one capacitor terminal, exactly half of it will seemingly migrate to the other terminal. Weird. But for capacitors with small, wide-spaced plates, an extra electron on the wire will make +q not equal -q.

In detail: if the capacitance across the plates is 10,000pF, and the capacitance to Earth of each wire and plate is 0.01 pF, then the opposite plate charges will ignore any small +q and/or -q on the wires. The attraction/repulsion of electrons in the wires doesn't significantly alter the enormous +q and -q on the inner side of the capacitor plates.

Engineers use real-world components: wide capacitor plates with narrow gaps; gaps the thickness of insulating film. But if you were a physicist, your capacitors might be metal spheres with large gaps between, or metal disks where the space between the plates was large when compared to their diameter. (Or you'd draw a capacitor symbol where the gap between plates was enormous and easy to see.) In this case the attraction/repulsion of electrons on the connecting wires would have an effect on the balance of +q -q between capacitor plates.

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