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I am looking to have a program which would alert me whenever a certain RFID tag would no longer be read, however I don't want to use NFC since I need the distance to be of at least 50cm+. Is there anyway to transmit an RFID tag over that distance which would be more cost, space and power effective then just doing it over bluetooth?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ NFC - what does that mean? \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Feb 28 '14 at 22:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ near field communication \$\endgroup\$ – user37992 Feb 28 '14 at 22:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ You need to specify a couple of important details before this question can even begin to get an effective answer. First off it is important to know if this is for a one-off or two-off play around project. Second, I think you really need to specify your acceptable power budget at the end where the RFID tag is located. \$\endgroup\$ – Michael Karas Mar 1 '14 at 1:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ thanks for the feedback, by one-off or two-off I assume you mean if data needs to go back and forth (if not, please explain some more or as I thought now, if asking if I've done this before,no I've only handled raspberry pi and arduino microcontrollers via usb and ssh before) to which I say no, I would only have this tag located somewhere and a phone lets say which would alert me if it is no longer reading the tag. The power would be handled by a battery like this? tinyurl.com/nrz6pub \$\endgroup\$ – user37992 Mar 1 '14 at 10:14
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If you really want to use RFID, you will have the following possibilities to reach distances greater than 50 cm:

  • HF RFID at 13.56 MHz, particularly the tags based on the ISO 15693 standard (not NFC and ISO 14443 which operate on the same frequency), which do not have any security features and the reader has no need to feed the crypto chips within the tags. However, if you use inductive based RFID technologies, keep in mind that the reader antennas diameter has to be in the range of the distance to be bypassed. Some NFC controllers support also the ISO 15693 standard. If you get a reader, checkout for higher energy supply.
  • UHF RFID around 900 MHz (frequency depends where you use it): Distances up to 10 meters in free space are possible. The disadvantage is the high price due to the more sophisticated hardware.
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Ok thanks, all I needed was something to get my search really started on \$\endgroup\$ – user37992 Mar 1 '14 at 22:37

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