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I have to design a generalised kit for online condition monitoring of induction motor (1Hp, 3hp and 5hp) and monitor voltage, current and temperature.

I was thinking to use a Hall effect sensor/clamp on Current Transformer (clamp on CT -I to V converter-rectifier-ADC-controller) for current measurement and PT (PT-rectifier-ADC-controller) for voltage measurement.

I am not sure what will be more economical for current measurement as the kit should be portable. I also dont know what will be the rating of clamp on CT.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Hello and welcome to Stack Exchange! Your question is potentially good but needs some rework to be clearer. I started by fixing some grammar issues and typos (pay attention to this if you want a better response), but you could expand the central paragraph about what you intend doing. \$\endgroup\$
    – clabacchio
    Mar 3, 2014 at 15:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't know either but you have the best chance of figuring it out because you'll know exactly what induction motor you are using and you know exactly what "economical" means. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Mar 3, 2014 at 15:01

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Generally speaking, a standard current transformer would be easier to engineer for high accuracy. Hall effect sensors have to be specially compensated to achieve very high accuracy, but they can be used to detect AC and DC component current. If you don't particularly care about DC current flows - and I'm betting you dont - then surely you can find an off the shelf clamp on CT that will suit the entire range. I don't know what voltage you're operating at, but just make sure that the CTs rating prevents it from being saturated in the highest expected input current. Also, you could probably find a fairly standard 4 to 20 mA interface for the CT that could significantly reduce your overall development time, depending on your controller platform.

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