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I used to use a breadboard, and it would hold the components put into it. A wire wrap board is different. The components are don't seem to be secured to the board. How are they supposed to be secured to the board?

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    \$\begingroup\$ There are these little carrier plugs that fit in 14 pin or 16 pin sockets, that will accommodate 7 or 8 small components, like 1/8W resistors or disc ceramic caps or 1n400x, etc. For example with the 16 pin kind, you'd have a resistor (or cap, etc) between pins 1 and 16, another between pins 2 and 15, etc. I believe this is what Leon Heller's referring to. \$\endgroup\$
    – JustJeff
    Commented Feb 16, 2011 at 2:37

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I'm not sure if this is what you're asking, but you are supposed to use sockets specific to wire-wrapping. The pins in these sockets are square and have very sharp edges. The mere act of wrapping the wire will hold the socket in place. Then you press your components into the socket.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So for each component that I want to put on the board, I have to use a socket for it? \$\endgroup\$ Commented Feb 16, 2011 at 1:18
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    \$\begingroup\$ That's how I did everything in school, but I totally understand that that seems like overkill. They even sell plastic holders with pins that stick into IC wirewrap sockets, and then you solder your resistors and diodes to it. I looked at Jameco's website but couldn't think of the right search keyword. I had bought them there, but back in the day I was ordering from the catalog. :) \$\endgroup\$
    – Dave
    Commented Feb 16, 2011 at 4:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ try 'header plug' \$\endgroup\$
    – JustJeff
    Commented Feb 16, 2011 at 11:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JustJeff thanks! That's exactly what I was referring to. \$\endgroup\$
    – Dave
    Commented Feb 16, 2011 at 14:31
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You can also buy dedicated pins that allow you to solder on one side (usually bifurcated) and wire wrap on the other. The pins have a shoulder that you can jam into the PCB through hole to secure it.

Basically, if you want to attach a component to a wire wrap board that component has to be connected to a wire wrap pin. Whether that's a dedicated terminal, a single piece of a strip socket, a repurposed DIP socket, or a component carrier plugged into a DIP socket - that's your choice.

As an aside, unless you're dealing with exotic components or have a stash of wire wrap stuff, wire wrap components seem pretty expensive. Digikey wants $3 to $7 for a 16 pin DIP socket. You might be better served by doing point-to-point wiring on a Veroboard.

Edit to add:

OK, given the specific example of a voltage regulator, how would you add that? Let's assume this is a TO-220 or similar package. There are three leads that need to be connected, so you need to connect them to three wire wrap pins. Exactly how you do this depends on what kind of wire wrap pins you have:

  • Terminal pins (bifurcated or not): I'd solder the pins to the component, then plug the whole thing into the perfboard, then wire-wrap to the pins.

  • DIP socket: plug the three leads into 3 adjacent socket pins (bending if necessary), then wire-wrap to those pins.

  • SIP or discrete sockets: same as DIP sockets.

If this were a TO-92 with an off-pitch triangular lead layout, you might have to "normalize" the leads to fit the 100 mil pitch of the perfboard. Just use good pliers to make it fit (or cheat and get the 3 leads started into 3 holes, and use the perfboard to leadform it - this is what I'd do).

Other tips:

Don't forget that you can cut skeletonized wire wrap sockets apart to make discrete socket pins/SIP socket strips.

You might have to glue the wire wrap sockets in place, especially when using single-pin connections.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What if I'm just putting in something like a voltage regulator? \$\endgroup\$ Commented Feb 16, 2011 at 3:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ @awakeFromNib - use the single pins he mentions. They're just a wire-wrap post, but at one end there's a wider bit that press-fits into the hole, and then the very end is a little fork that you cram the component lead into. A touch of solder will bond the component into the pin. Biggest advantage - you can set the pins anywhere, and accommodate any sort of discrete you want. \$\endgroup\$
    – JustJeff
    Commented Feb 16, 2011 at 11:57
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I used to solder them to carriers plugged into wire-wrap sockets.

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