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I am trying to measure the power consumption of IFC6410 . The below mentioned schematic describes what I have tried.

Block diagram.

(A) works, (B) does not show me any current reading and the board does not boot up, the power LED keeps on blinking. Multimeter is set at 10A. Let me know if you need any more info.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Where exactly is the "power LED" that keeps on blinking? Have you verified that you can measure any kind of current at all in any kind of circuit using the same meter in the same configuration? \$\endgroup\$ – Joe Hass Mar 13 '14 at 15:13
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    \$\begingroup\$ I know your diagram shows the 10A range as "unfused" but the most common reason for setup "B" not to work is that someone has blown the fuse or the current shunt in the multimeter by hooking it to a voltage source while it's set up for reading current. Not sure about the power LED, maybe the meter is damaged and has a lot of drop across it? Can you use another meter to measure the voltage at the input to the IFC6410? \$\endgroup\$ – John D Mar 13 '14 at 15:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JoeHass Power LED is on IFC6410. I haven't really tried that. Will try it tomorrow and let you know. \$\endgroup\$ – rajat Mar 13 '14 at 16:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JohnD I checked the fuse and it is fine. I don't have another meter, but will buy one to check. \$\endgroup\$ – rajat Mar 13 '14 at 16:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ You don't need another meter - you should be able to set the meter to "Ohms" and then measure the resistance from the current terminal to common. \$\endgroup\$ – W5VO Mar 13 '14 at 21:21
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If

  • The red lead is in the "10A" socket on the meter and
  • The range switch is set to "A"

then the multimeter or one of it's leads are broken (or incorrectly attached to the test circuit). You can check this using a second multimeter to test the resistance across the "10A" and "COM" sockets.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I know the leads are not broken, as the multimeter is measuring the correct voltage across various components. How much should the resistance be between 10A and COM ? \$\endgroup\$ – rajat Mar 13 '14 at 16:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ @rajat: near enough 0. \$\endgroup\$ – RedGrittyBrick Mar 13 '14 at 18:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ yes, it is 0.4ohm. \$\endgroup\$ – rajat Mar 14 '14 at 7:14

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