1
\$\begingroup\$

I wonder , Why when we study communications systems , we just study the theoretical part(Math) , and we never touch the electrical circuits that used to implements this systems , I have asked my DR. that teaching me a communication course , and he told me "know theory , then you simply know the electronic circuits" , then i asked another DR. that given me another course and he told me that is a advanced topics , So Im confused about this , could any one give me a clear answer ?

\$\endgroup\$

closed as primarily opinion-based by Joe Hass, Daniel Grillo, Chetan Bhargava, Keelan, Matt Young Apr 10 '14 at 13:26

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Has your DR ever had a real job? \$\endgroup\$ – John U Apr 9 '14 at 18:11
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @JohnU Do you mean job in industry ? \$\endgroup\$ – hbak Apr 9 '14 at 18:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ Note that Math is a universal truth (if a theorem was correct yesterday it will be so tomorrow), but implementation details will evolve over time. So for other aspects equal, Math is more useful in the long run. \$\endgroup\$ – Wouter van Ooijen Apr 9 '14 at 19:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes. Designing anything from theory / texbooks alone would lead to a hell of a lot of problems on contact with reality. I'm simplifying massively (knowing the theory is good), but I and many others I know all have stories about people (often new grads) who know all the theory but are totally useless at actually making any practical thing work in real life, be it electronics, mechanical, or software, etc.. \$\endgroup\$ – John U Apr 9 '14 at 19:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ In my country we have two types of universities, a more practical and a more theoretical version. The theoretical is considered somewhat higher/more difficult, but not by much. If salaries show their usefulness: the initial salaries are equal (somtimes a little higher for the practical variant), the rise over time is equal to, but after some years the salaries for the practical variant flatten out, while the salaries for the more theoretical version keep rising. Tentative conclusion: you can learn practical aspects after school, theoretical aspects must be learned at school. \$\endgroup\$ – Wouter van Ooijen Apr 10 '14 at 9:56
1
\$\begingroup\$

I questioned the same thing in school. I think it's because many electrical engineers never have a job that uses this info at all. If you do go into it, then there's a lot of information to understand how each component works. Once you understand how all of the theoretical blocks work, you can view a circuit and "see" that a part of it is just a theoretical building block. If you were to view an entire circuit without understanding the theory, you'd get so confused that you'd just drown in info overload.

Once you understand the theory, you can look into how each block is made. For example, this is what a non-op amp analog multiplier looks like: http://www.freepatentsonline.com/7061300.html
If this was part of a full circuit, you wouldn't have a clue where to start.

Another thing to note is that there's multiple ways to realize each of these theoretical elements. Engineering is all about choice.

Note: I was going to put this as a comment, but it got too big.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ I agree. I think that you first need the theory to understand what the circuit you build is supposed to accomplish. In modern communications the non-ideal behavior of electrical components is a non-trivial factor so if one does not understand the theory it will be hard to assess the quality if the implementations. \$\endgroup\$ – SomeEE Apr 9 '14 at 18:46
1
\$\begingroup\$

A cut-down answer but I feel a reasonable one:

You can be good at something knowing only theory or having only practical experience, but to be really great you need both.

If you only have one, you WILL make a lot of mistakes / waste a lot of time learning the other by trial-and-error.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

To do basic design , you need to know either real examples or theory, but to explore new designs, a great designer needs to learn both. With the theory, it is easier to understand why and how any method works.

Real world design requires a lot of experience not readily available to Professors, so the theory is presented and with that you can explore examples. I find the education in Asia uses more modern examples with theory to make the learning experience more relevant.

But communication theory covers a vast number of concepts that are crucial to design evolution, such as work done by Nyquist, Hartley,Turing, Shannon, Werner, Chandler etc. that all assist in error-free efficient coding. These must be understood to appreciate all the tradeoffs in realization, which are more interesting, I think.

\$\endgroup\$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.