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I plan to create a magnetic vibrator to shake a small container. What I plan is to buy

  1. Two "Magnet Wire 14 AWG Gauge Enameled Copper 1.5lb 118ft 200C Magnetic Coil Winding"
  2. a custom made container with two strong magnets on each side, the container will be held by two bearing, so the container can "swing"
  3. a power resistor (Any suggestion of where I could buy a variable power resistor)

I plan to put the container in middle in two magnetic coils where those two coils and the power resistor are in series. I plan to use power from wall outlet 120V60Hz to create the magnetic field

Any suggestion?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Any idea what current you'll need thru the coils to do what you want? \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Apr 11 '14 at 20:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ Taking the geometry of the spool as it is in the picture, the AWG number and the absence of iron core, the maximum current will not exceed 3.6A for each coil, for continuous operation. \$\endgroup\$ – GR Tech Apr 12 '14 at 4:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ @GRTech You are right. The current is max 3.6A. The reason I decide that because I can make around 115 coils (at 1" radius) with a reasonable cost. Since the magnetic field is proportional to current and number of coils, but the wire cost is much higher if the current increase. I will limit the current, but increase the number of loops. \$\endgroup\$ – Superhero Apr 12 '14 at 7:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ Nothing wrong with wanting to make your own motor. You might want to consider a Variac (variable output transformer) rather than a resistor. Variac is widely available \$\endgroup\$ – Marla May 12 '14 at 1:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ You don't actually say what the variable resistor is for. But if it's for power adjustment, a variac, as Marla suggests, is probably the easiest. High power rheostats used to be common for stage lighting, but are more likely to be solid state these days. \$\endgroup\$ – Simon B Dec 15 '17 at 23:08
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Does it have to be magnetic? The simplest way to make a "shaker" is a motor with an offset weight. It can be as simple as strapping a small motor to the container with a little weight on the shaft that is not centered. The imbalance will create a lot of vibration. This is how the vibrators in phones work.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes! Has to be magnetic. \$\endgroup\$ – Superhero Apr 12 '14 at 7:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ motors are magnetic \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Apr 12 '14 at 16:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, of course motors are magnetic! But there is a huge difference between using a a device already optimized for turning magnetic fields into motion (a motor) and trying to directly use magnetic fields to move something (his shaker). In the absence of clarifying information, I am unconvinced that his method is more efficient. \$\endgroup\$ – lyndon Apr 13 '14 at 14:25

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