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Is it practical to use Xbee for extending the wifi range of my home router? I thought of the following steps:

  • Providing the router output to an Xbee transmitting unit.
  • Transmit signals to the next Xbee.
  • Re-transmit the Wifi signals.

I would like to do it as my next academic project.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Is it possible? Probably yes. Is it practical? No. Just buy a second wireless access point. \$\endgroup\$ – David Apr 27 '14 at 14:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ask yourself what the maximum bandwidth is for Xbee, then ask yourself what bandwidth you need to make things workable for you. \$\endgroup\$ – jippie Apr 27 '14 at 16:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ There is a market for the kind of device you are talking about. There are repeaters, but most of them login to an existing wifi network and broadcast one with a different name and password. Either use an off the shelf solution, or build a cool stand alone repeater that bounces the same network farther with adequate latency, but I doubt Xbee has what you want. \$\endgroup\$ – Sean Boddy Apr 28 '14 at 7:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ At the above comments, it's an academic project. What's the harm in recreating an existing product? I've done it before as a hobby, and it can be very educational. However, bandwidth may be a concern, yes. Additionally, how would you handle passing yourself from one Xbee to another? To avoid interference, the two would likely need to be at different frequencies, which means you can't just repeat the signal without further processing. If you keep them on the same frequency, you need to keep the two antennas far enough apart to avoid interference. Worst case, you could reduce wifi range. \$\endgroup\$ – Jason_L_Bens May 16 '14 at 2:16

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